Winter dreams of unfinished painting!

   Winter dreams of unfinished painting!

 Long march followed by our ethnic brothers to Shwe Bamar

Dear Nan,                

I hope you already know the source of this title, “Winter dreams of unfinished painting”. Burma’s one of the most famous song composer, Saya Myoma Nyein’s song “unfinished painting” was used as the theme song in Win Oo’s multiple academy award winning movie, “Winter dreams”.  

Our Ethnic brothers searching for the “Paradise on Earth” is now like chasing the “Mirage Paradise”. Myanmar Tatmadaw is smashing their hope and annihilating their destiny. Now our Ethnic brothers’ searching for the “Paradise on Earth” is like the “Mid Winter dreams” and our Union of Federal Democratic Burma is like the “unfinished painting.” That is true, literally or as a matter of fact, I am absolutely right. SPDC Junta will never finish their “Fake road map to Democracy”

Dear darling, all of us progress successively from Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Steel Age, Mechanical Revolution Age, Electrical Age, Atomic Age, Computer Age, Internet Age, ICT Age and K-economy Age (Knowledge based economy) because students not only learned but tried to be better than their teachers. I am not insulting the teachers dear Nan. Just because you are working as a lecturer, you are a little bit bias, angry and thought I am insulting all my teachers. Actually I always respect my teachers and also know their plight: the grinding stones became thinner helping to sharpen the knives.

Our Lord Buddha pointed out to us the virtues of the candle light (fire) sharing the fire (light) to light up another candle. You never lost any thing, but could help light up another candle. We need to think like that. Teachers are sharing or distributing their knowledge but the students must not stop or satisfied with what they are taught. Even Lord Buddha had taught us not just to accept any thing without thinking, including his teachings. So don’t angry with me dear Nan. You should instead happy with your student’s small progress. Although I am gloating, I had made a blunder again. Sorry Nan, I am drifting away a lot from my topic again.

Dear darling Nan, as I had already answered earlier, our people of Shwe Bama village are said to be descendants of three main Migrant Ancestor branches or families:

(1) Mon-Khmer,

(2) Tibeto-Burman and

(3) Tai Shan-Chinese.

Daw Daw Mon is a desendant of of this Mon-Khmer group family. Humans lived in the region that is now known as our Shwe Bama village as early as 11,000 years ago, but the first identifiable civilization is that of the Daw Daw Mon. See Nan, this fact is contrary to U Ka Yin’s claim.

But I think it is no use for us to quarrel who came first when the most important real practical fact is that we all are sailing together in the same boat. It is no use trying to fight over who is the original owner, who came later and who is just a freshman comming in and join last. Once we accepted any one as a fellow traveller or a citizen, we must be fair to all of them, should stop all discriminations and treat as an all-equal-partner. We need the combined undivided effort to reach our destination, Democratic Federal Union of Burma/Myanmar.

The weather out side is bad, SPDC thunderstorm is still strong, it cause Kyant Phut and Swan Arrshin waves which could pull and push our ship into danger. Instead of fighting among each other and wasting our energy, we must focus all our energy to fight our common enemy, SPDC and cohorts.

Daw Daw Mon actually began her long march of migration into our Shwe Bama village in about 3000 BC, and her first kingdom Suwarna Bhumi village, or “Golden Land” was founded around the port of Thaton in about 300 BC.

Daw Daw Mon’s tradition folk tales suggests that they had contact with Buddhism via seafaring as early as the 3rd century BC. But definitely by the 2nd century BC, they received an envoy of monks from Ashoka, Ko Kala’s village. Much of the Daw Daw Mon’s written records have been destroyed during the wars with Shwe Bamars.

By the mid-9th century, Daw Daw Mon became a dominant force in all of southern Shwe Bama. Even in Malay Chronicles called “Sejarah Melayu”, Pago/Bago men were recorded to arrive Malacca, the first Malay kingdom, and were even regarded as one of their founders, forefathers or ancestors of Malaysia!

Yes, whether you could easily believe it or not, whether present Malaysians could easily accept or not is not important. I have to officially records which I curiously found while I was searching in the old history books in the universities.

I wish to repeat again, dear Nan, our Daw Daw Mon’s children were regarded as part of Malaysia’s ancestors. Daw Daw Mon’s descendants are also known as Talaings because of their origin partly from Talingana village (State) of Ko Kala’s village tract. But most of them think that Talaing is a derogatory name for them and wish only to be known as Daw Daw Mon’s desendants.

Daw Daw Mon blended U Kala and Mon culture (carried and inherited from U Tayoke’s place) together and emerged as a hybrid of the two great civilizations. I hereby wish to apologize my Mon friends because some of you may be obviously offended by the name Talaing. But let me continue talking about the truths but not gossips about the alleged secret afairs of Daw Daw Mon and U Talaing.

Dear darling, at the above mentioned seminar we attended in 2001 called, Ethnic Minorities Struggles along the Thai-Burmese Border“, Pisanh, a Mon representative, presented about his great grand Aunty Daw Daw Mon ancestors building kingdoms villages in Shwe Bama village tract and other parts of Asia.

According to Daw Daw Mon and Shwe Bama village records, before Buddha achieved Enlightenment, Alika and Tapusa, two Mon merchants, had presented khao tu [sweetened rice] to Buddha. Lord Buddha then gave his eight hairs to those two Daw Daw Mon’s merchants. They then brought the hairs to their Daw Daw Mon’s village head and he put the Buddha’s hairs in a pagoda. That pagoda is now known as Shwedagon, and has become a symbol of Shwe Bama village.

Daw Daw Mon’s village kingdom was destroyed by the Shwe Bama village heads. First Thaton village was conquered by King Anawrattha in eleventh century. He bitterly accused that in 1757 King Alongphaya of Burma attacked and burn the Mon capital of Hongsawadee village (Han Tha Wadee) about 3,000 Mon monks were killed.

The Mon religious leaders fled to U Thai’s village. Ten years later the U Thai’s kingdom of Ayutthaya village was also destroyed by the Shwe Bamas. But later U Thai Land village heads skilfully used Daw Daw Mon, U Ka Yin, Daw Daw Shan and other ethnic groups to play as buffer states between the Ko Thai and Shwe Bamas.

Daw Daw Mon’s Dvaravati kingdom ( Danya Waddy village) existed from the 6th. to the 11th. centuries AD, when it was conquered by the Ko Khmer’s Empire. And that Ko Ko Khmer’s Empire or village tract was centred on the Chao Phraya River valley in modern-day Ko Thai Land’s village, with Nakhon Pathom village as the capital and spread up to lower Shwe Bama village tract.

Dear Nan, I wish to give a just brief account of Ko Khmer’s village empire that was a powerful village kingdom based in what is now Daw Kam Bodia’s village. Ko Khmer’s village empire, which seceded from the kingdom of Chenla, at times ruled over parts of modern-day U Laos’ village, Ko Thai Land’s village and Daw Viet Nam’s village. Its greatest legacy is Ankhor, which was the capital during the empire’s zenith. Ko Khmer villageers are Hindu and Mahayana Buddhists but later changed into Theravada Buddhists after the new version of religion was introduction from U Sri Lanka’s village  in the 13th. centurt.

Dear Nan, Daw Daw Mon’s cousins, U Kaya, Daw Wa, Ko Palaung, Ma Padaung, Daw Pale, U Yao, Ma La, and others are originated from the Mon-Khmer group. Actually Mon-Khmers are sea-migrants of the east from Ko Kala or India’s  Talingana State mixed with the invader Mongols from the north. U U Mon-Khamars also stayed in U Thai Land village and Daw Kam Bodia villages.

Shwe Bama villagers got their cultures, written language , religion, arts and skills dubbed ten flowers: goldsmith (ba-dein) , silversmith, woodcarving (ba-bu) , painting ( ba-gyi) ,  Blacksmith (ba-bè), Stucco relief  (pan-daw), Masonary  ( pa-yan), Stone carving (pan-ta-maw) , Turnery  (pan but), Lacquerware (pan-yun) and Bronze casting from U U Mon-KhamarsDaw Daw Mon and her cousins from U Thai Land’s village!

Dear Nan, it is a little bit strange for me because we were taught in the history books that Shwe Bama village head Anawrattha conquered Daw Daw Mon village head Manuha and brought back the Buddhism and all the skilled persons but our Shwe Bama written language is more related to Daw Daw Shan’s cousins Ma Mon, from U Thai Land’s village rather than our own sister Daw Daw Mon.

Dear Nan, in the chronicles of U Thai Land, it stated that Daw Daw Mon’s relatives were one of the earliest distinct groups to occupy Shwe Bama, moving into the area as early as 1500 BCE, or possibly earlier. Daw Daw Mon’s relatives had established the historical kingdoms of Dvaravati (Danya Waddy) and Haripunchai.

Until the 14th century AD, Daw Daw Mon’s culture continued to spread very far east, including modern U Thai’s village and Issan plateau cities such as Lampang and Khon Kaen. As late as the 14th and 15th centuries, it is believed that the Daw Daw Mon’s relatives were the ethnic majority in this vast region, but intermarried freely with U Kam Bodia and U Tai-Kadai (your Daw Daw Shan’s relatives) populations. Archaeological remains of Daw Daw Mon’s settlements have been found south of Vientiane village, and may also have extended further to the north-west in the Haripunchai village era.

Dear Nan, according to the chronicles of U Thai Land, Daw Daw Mon’s cousins converted to Theravada Buddhism at a very early point in their history; unlike other ethnic groups in the region, they seem to have adopted Theravada orthodoxy before coming into contact with Mahayana tendencies. And it is believed that the Daw Daw Mon had converted U Thai and U Kam Bodia from Hindu/Mahayanism to Theravada Buddhism (15th century). So this is another version of the event how you got Buddhism.

Dear Nan, it is interesting that like us, U Thai and some present day Ma Mon has tried to identify her ethnicity with the semi-historical kingdom of Suwarnabhumi. Historical scholars pointed out that the early usage of the term (as found in the edicts of Ashoka during the U Kala’s Village tract’s haydays of Buddhism) indicated a location in Southern India, and not in South-East Asia. However, from the time of the first translations of the Ashokan inscriptions in the 19th century, both the Shwe Bama and U Thai have tried to identify place-names found in the edicts with their own territory or culture; sometimes these claims have also relied upon the creative interpretation of place-names found in Chinese historical sources. (This is taken from U Thai’s records.)

Dear Nan, I am excited to know that, Suwannaphum (also Suwarnabhumi) remains one of the most mythified in the his ory of Asia and in U Thai Land’s village, their head of village and village museums insist that it was somewhere along their southern coast. And so they had named the new Bangkok village airport after the mythic kingdom of Suwarnabhumi, or “Suwannaphum” or Thu Wanna Bumi meant Golden Land in Burmese.

Dear Nan, when I wrote about your Daw Daw Shan, I forgot to mention about her ancestor origin that she was a descendant of the Tai Shan-Chinese group. Daw Daw Shan, U Pha Hti or U Ka Yin and Daw Taungthu, etc., all have their roots in the Tai-Chinese community and descended from present U Ta Yoke’s village tract and had made a long march through Ko Yu Nans village.

We already knew the relation of Daw Daw Shan and her twin sister Daw Daw Siam, now known as Daw Thai. Their languages are also similar and both of them feel that they are twin sisters, just separated by the border. Some of the Daw Shan’s descendants prefer to be called Tai. “Shan” is a Burmese corruption of “Syam” or “Siam”, or Thai or Tai. Shwe Bama Shans are much more in common ethnically and culturally with their cousins in U Thai village than the Shwe Bama villagers.

“In the past, there were 33 provincial towns in Muang Tai and each town was governed by chao fah or Saw Bwa,” said Chaiya Khongchuen of the Tai Union. “Burma was directly colonized by Great Britain, but Muang Tai [the Shan State] was just a Protectorate State. Ne Win killed many chao fahs (Saw Bwas) during 1962 coup.

On May 21, 1958, Tai leader Saw Yanda announced that he was waging war against the Burmese government,” Chaiya said at the above mentioned seminar.

But excuse me Nan, I even dosed off on the computer key-board. I am too tired yesterday. I need a rest. I will continue tomorrow.

 Good-bye darling

Yours with love

(Ko Tin Nwe)

BO AUNG DIN  

 

One Response

  1. […]    Winter dreams of unfinished painting! […]

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: