Political Prisoner, ‘Afraid of Nothing,’ Dies of TB

Political Prisoner,

‘Afraid of Nothing,’ Dies of TB

Copied from Irrawaddy By SAW YAN NAING

A political prisoner, Win Tin, also known as Annul, a youth member of the main opposition National League for Democracy, died on Thursday in Tharrawaddy Prison in Burma, while serving a 24-year sentence of hard labor, according to a human rights group.

Win Tin, 30, died of tuberculosis in the prison in Pegu Division, according to the Thailand-based Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma).

A Muslim, Win Tin was arrested in 1999 for his political activities.

Myat Hla, the chairman of the NLD office in Pegu, said, “He [Win Tin] had been suffering from tuberculosis for a long time. We heard often that his health condition was bad, and he didn’t receive medical treatment in prison. This morning, when his family members went to see him, he had already died.”

Win Tin is survived by his wife. He joined the NLD when he was teenager and was very active in the political movement, said Myat Hla.

“He was afraid nothing,” he said.

Bo Kyi, the joint secretary of the AAPP, said Win Tin had suffered from tuberculosis since 2002. He didn’t receive proper medical treatment in spite of specific requests from his family members to prison authorities, he said.

“Medical treatment in Burmese prisons is very poor,” said Bo Kyi. “If the authorities don’t provide sufficient medical treatment, more prisoners will die in the future.”

The military government charged Win Tin with activities destructive to the stability of the regime.

The AAPP estimates that there are 1,864 political prisoners in Burmese prisons.

Farewell friend, Sai Htee Sai

Farewell friend, Sai Htee Sai

saihteesaing.jpg

By

Sit Mone

This blogger was shocked to read the news of demise of Burmese talented singer Sai Htee Sai in Mizzima news.

Ko Htee…

We were brought up as a generation

Who loved to listen and play your songs

Yours were natural and simple

Easy to understand while leaving all of us with the message

That went straight into our heart

Your songs were like the work of a wizard

Together with perfect match of lyrics

You were a talented star

With a distinctive voice..

That we called the “power” of voice..

Which was special gift for you from heaven

That’s why

When we were happy, we have sung your songs

When we were sad, we have sung your songs

When we failed exams, we have sung your songs

When we passed exams, we have sung your songs

When our friends were left by girlfriends, we have sung your songs

When our friends get nods from their loved ones, we have sung your songs

Now we seldom sing songs as all of us are not in a mood to sing any songs

However….

Whenever we miss Burma, we are still singing your songs…

And from now on … people will continue singing your songs

As you have left your legacy..your songs are Modern Classics of Burma..

May Ko Htee’s soul rest in peace

Sit Mone

(This blogger does not forget to mention the wonderful work of great composer Dr Sai Kham Laik for creating most of Ko Htee’s songs from this insignificant blog)

OIC summit full of rhetorics

OIC summit full of rhetorics

Written by Kazi Mahmood   

The 11th summit of the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC) is being held at Dakar, Senegal amid tight security and the usual rhetoric that accompanies such meetings. The leaders of the Muslim nations which are member states of the organization are still struggling to offer solutions to the immediate problems that affect the Muslim world while the situation within the conference rooms does not augur well for the organization’s new charter.

Foreign Affairs Minister, Sheik Tidiane Gadio, urged the senior officials of the Organisation of Islamic Conference (OIC), gathered Saturday in Dakar, to draw up a consensual new OIC charter likely to be accepted by all the 57 member states of this organization.

His urgent call defines the underlining frustration that has clouded the organizing of this conference for the second time in Senegal in 17 years. On Tuesday, the foreign ministers of the OIC nations were still debating on the modalities to adopt the new charter but reports indicated that this will be delayed for yet another term.

It might be possible that the new charter will be debated in Egypt where the next OIC summit (the 12th Summit) will probably be held according to information grasped in the corridors of the conference.

The failure to finalize the new charter indicates the deep trouble that characterizes organizations such as the OIC, which does not have the structures to behave like the United Nations (UN) and is not as united as the Arab League (AL). The OIC, after Senegal, will remain a hybrid organization that is trying to adapt to the changes in the world, particularly the globalization issues and the centralization of the world trade under the western dominated World Trade Organization (WTO).

Migration, which is a terrible headache among member countries of the OIC, will also be on the agenda of the 11th summit thanks to efforts made by former Senegalese Minister Mme Ndioro Ndiaye who is the assistant Director General of the OIM Organization Internationale pour les Migrations.

Migration is a growing issue in the world today and the former Minister is pressing for the OIC to set an agenda that will allow for the member countries to ease migration. She said that migration among OIC member states should be treated as an important matter and must be made easier.

Countries like Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and even Egypt has tough migratory rules that do not allow the smooth transition of migrant workers on their soil. It is probably in the spirit of Muslim brotherhood that such migratory rules could be downgraded in order to allow for the integration of foreign migrants in OIC member states.

The OIC meeting is being held under tight security, necessary at times for head of states but useless for foreign and local journalists covering the event. This summit has seen an upgrading of the security process since its beginning on the 8th of the month with various badges and passes required for journalists to access areas that are considered ‘secured’ for foreign dignitaries.

This defeats the purpose to have all heads of states under one roof and makes them unavailable to the local or international press on claims that their security is at stake. These leaders owe the people an explanation on why the OIC is still an organization that has not yet found its purpose and is still struggling to decide on a new charter.

From Pakistan to Senegal, the people of the OIC member states are asking why the organization has failed them in many ways and has reached its 11th summit without even considering the security of the people.

If the summit is about the security of the head of states alone then who will decide on the security of the people in countries? Certainly in places where the enemies of Islam are having a free hand at killing innocents, raping women and controlling Muslim lands such as in Iraq, Afghanistan and Palestine.

On the other hand, Souleymane Gano Senegalese journalist attached to the Agence de Presse Senegalaise (APS) told WFOL that it was a great pleasure that an African country organizes the OIC meeting; this allows us to develop our infrastructures. Part of Dakar is now changed with news infrastructures, new roads and certainly new hotels.

This offers temporary employment to the local people but also it allows the country to develop its friendship and cooperation with muslim nations.

This cooperation can help the country to develop further.

‘Yes there will be some benefits with temporary employments, contacts and new investments in the country. The international and muslim nations media are now zooming on Senegal and this helps and this portrays the good prospect for the country.’ he said, adding that it also shows that Senegal is living and alive and is trying to develop and this is good for Africa. There are not only wars or famine in Africa but there is hope and with people who are willing to work for development and the youth can believe in this hope.

Senegal looks beset by too many problems that have forced it to postpone the OIC summit from 2006 to 2008. The 10th summit was held in Malaysia in 2003 and the 11th summit was to take place in 2006 but delays due to the current economic situation in Senegal hampered the progress in the infrastructural development of the country for the summit.

Now that the summit is on, the country still seem to be struggling in the organization of the event though on the bright side it is the hospitality of the Senegalese people that has comforted the guests and foreign journalists visiting the country.

Foreign workers keeping inflation rate down

Foreign workers keeping inflation rate down

Yee | Malaysiakini Feb 23, 08 3:55pm

Expelling foreign workers, like what the government is planning to do, is not going to help the economy of Malaysia. In fact, it will drive the inflation rate (the real rate – not government figures) up significantly. The reason for this is because many menial jobs like restaurant waiters and construction workers will not be filled by locals who request a much higher pay for the same jobs.

So with foreign workers gone, employers will have to turn to the locals to fill up the positions. The wages for locals are between 30% to 40% higher than what the foreigners earn. So where would the extra money to meet this increased cost come from? Consumers and end-users will ultimately have to bear this added cost once again further driving up the inflation rate.

Instead of driving foreign workers away, Malaysia should seriously look into developing its skilled labour by providing more technical and skilled training. This can be achieved by setting up technical schools for the various professions like IT, engineering, agriculture and business.

These schools should be concentrated outside of the cities where our young dropouts or those who complete their Form 5 or Form 6 can enroll in. These polytechnic schools should be both affordable and of a high standard.

We should leave menial labor to the foreign workers as they help build infrastructure and the economy. We should concentrate on raising our level of knowledge and further educating our young Malaysians so that they can contribute to the wealth of the nation and are marketable both in Malaysia and abroad.

Resounding vote of NO could lead to the Second Independence

Resounding vote of NO

could lead to the

Second Independence

I have edited and adapted to the Myanmar context from the original column in Malaysiakini by KJ John. I hope that  Malaysiakini and KJ John could understand and forgive us for this. They should even be proud that they could contribute a very good article for the fellow Myanmar/Burmese citizens.

 

 

‘The Japan that Can Say No’ was a book co-written by Sony chairman Akio Morita and politician Shintaro Ishihara during Japan’s rise as an economic power-house in 1989.

As a sequel many years later he and Dr Mahathir Mohamed co-wrote a book called, ‘The Asia that Can Say No!’

  1. Of course, they were talking about saying ‘No’ to the US and its Western allies and their agenda in Asia.
  2. Burmese citizens should also say a clear and clean NO to the SPDC’s referendum.
  3. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO to permanent Military dominance in Myanmar politics.
  4. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO corruption.
  5. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO cronyism.
  6. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO to the lack of transparency.
  7. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO to the lack of accountability. 
  8. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO to the lack of humility.
  9. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO to the lack of justice for all.
  10. Burmese citizens should also say a loud and clear NO to the lack of righteousness.

What did the people really need to say?

Is it that we were against Myanmar Tatmadaw per se or its politics of anti-multi-ethnicity?

Was it that we could not agree with the lack of_

  • Individual Freedom?
  • Religious freedom?
  • Human Rights?
  • Political freedom?
  • Freedom of speech?
  • Freedom of association?

We must vote NO to show clearly that we could not accept the fake democracy so called ‘disciplined democracy’.

Tatmadaw leaders should instead discipline themselves from their_

  • uncontrolled greediness,
  • uncontrollably high megalomania,
  • sky-high pride,
  • anger,
  • rudeness,
  • stubboness,
  • injustices
  • and barbarism e.t.c.

We need to send the real message in black and white with the on paper official verdict of resounding NO at referendum.

The real meaning of the message of NO in referendum should mean: ‘We the Burmese/Myanmar citizens have the right to decide on our government; not the SPDC, mainstream media, not the Kyant Phut and Swan Arrshin cronies.’  

I believe that it should be a vote against_

  • the arrogance of the SPDC,
  • the false promises,
  • the many lies told
  • and the lack of true, honest and sincere accountability to the people;
  • for that is what democracy is all about.

And worst of all was the SPDC government’s false assumption that ‘we the people’ could not see through the smokescreen!

Burma/Myanmar will never be the same again. We could even call this another struggle or a revolution for a new second Independence – Yes; maybe it should be called the real Independence!

Resounding NO would be a great victory for the people.

  • It should be a vote against the SPDC’s inability to listen to the voice of the people.
  • We should work together against corruption in any form and cronyism in all forms.
  • We should work together to revert to the rule of law – you cannot go wrong and the law will always be on your side.
  • The Truely Democratic Constitution should be supreme and the rule of law should be our guide.

We need to oppose the Rule by Law concept of the Tatmadaw. They believe that the arbitrary Law or power come out from the barrel of the gun.

The biblical story of David and Goliath could be repeated if we dare to confront the Myanmar Military at the referendum.

The ‘small’ ones, NLD and Daw Suu led oppositions campaigned on our true democratic principles, while the SPDC, Kyant Phuts and Swan Arrshin ‘big’ ones fought with the power of incumbency, with abuse of authority, and without willingness to listen.

The problem of the SPDC Generals is:

  • they have become so arrogant.
  • They suppress any opinion that they do not like
  • and they begin to believe in their own reports, which are not actually consistent with what is happening in the country.”

Moreover, the Tatmadaw leadership was drunk with power and believed many of its own lies. 

While at George Washington University, I had a full professor of two fields of knowledge: political science and psychology. He once gave a talk on “the socio-psychological profile of disabled leaders”, having studied political leaders of a 100-year period.  

He concluded that all political leaders achieve “their disabilities” when they stop listening to the contrarian’s views and start believing false information given by their aids, who often concoct the stories to build up their own hypothesis.

Let us take the example of SPDC advertisements all over Burma. They were so simplistic and naïve while full of lies, that almost all the citizens ignored them.