Let’s curse the Cyber criminals and their IT Masters

UPDATE:

Let’s curse the Cyber criminals and their IT Masters

 

7th. May 2008

 Tonight to my horror, Myanmar Military Cyber troopers started back their cyber-crime. I detected the reinvasion of virus in my computer.

Are you not ashamed?

Nearly one million Burmese people are missing and died including your Tatmadaw families.

Few Miollions of Myanmars are in trouble, no place to stay, no water, no food and no medical care.

And YOU CROOKS, CRIMINALS have a heart to go on giving trouble to others.

Shame on you, SPDC’s lapdog criminals.

 As the international governments, International IT companies and even UN have no gut or no mood to expose the SPDC’s cyber crimes, we have no choice but to CURSE them to hell!

As we have no choice we all should pray to God/Allah to punish those people who send viruses to infect our computers with various human-infective viruses including HIV virus.

This is not a simple prayer. This is actually a curse for the Cyber criminals and also a curse for their IT Masters from Russia, China, Singapore, US etc.

SPDC Cyber-crime stopped temporarily by Nargis

 Sorry to write this posting.

My deepest CONDOLENCE for the 22,000 death and possible few dozen thousand more death, (NLD’s unofficial figures stated that it may be up to 100, 000 deaths and few million lost of homes.)

 My computers, many Burmese expatriates’ computers and many opposition web pages/webmasters/editors’ computers are constantly bombarded with the Myanmar Military Cyber-criminals.

But since Saturday, I am surprised by the lack of VIRUS and malicious soft-wares; cookies, Trojan horse viruses were stopped.

This is the indirect proof that SPDC criminals are shamelessly committing the cyber crimes on its citizens.

 Although the International community, UN, NLD, opposition and most of the Burmese never recognized the coming referendum, if the got by crook or hook, this is one field SPDC generals could not get the amnesty in International Court.

  Ironically, SPDC Generals looked down on Indians and mixed blooded Indians was revenged by an Indian lady, Nargis. And the  SPDC Cyber-crime is stopped temporarily by Nargis.

 

 

 

 

Myanmar cyclone death toll soars past 22,000: state radio

Myanmar cyclone death toll soars past 22,000: state radio

The damaged No. 3 State High School, in Hlaing Tharyar

This handout photo made on May 4, 2008, and released Monday, ...

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar state radio says the cyclone death toll has risen above 22,000.

A news broadcast on government-run radio said Tuesday that 22,464 people have now been confirmed dead and thousands more are missing.

Cyclone Nargis tore through the country’s heartland and largest city, Yangon, early Saturday.

Relief efforts have been difficult, in large part because the storm destroyed roads and communications outlets.

The death toll from the devastating cyclone in Myanmar over the weekend escalated to nearly 4,000 people on Monday, with thousands of others still missing and at least one entire village wiped out, state television and radio reported. This NASA photo shows Cyclone Nargis in the Bay of Bengal as it approached the Western coast of Myanmar on Friday.

Photo: Associated Press

The first assistance from overseas arrived Tuesday from neighboring Thailand.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar officials said on Tuesday the death toll could continue to climb higher than the 14,000 already feared dead from the Southeast Asian nation’s devastating cyclone as the international community prepared to rush in aid.

An aerial view of devastation caused by Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar on Tuesday. (The Associated Press)

In the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis, state radio reported that the government was delaying a constitutional referendum in areas hit hardest.

Myanmar’s Information Minister Maj. Gen. Kyaw Hsan confirmed at a news conference that some 4,000 people had died in Yangon and the low-lying Irrawaddy delta region. He added that another 10,000 people could be dead in the delta.

A resident of Yangon raced for cover as the cyclone hit on Saturday. If the reports are accurate, the death toll would be the biggest from a natural disaster in Asia since the tsunami of December 2004, which devastated parts of Indonesia, Thailand and other parts of south Asia.

Photo: Barry Broman/Associated Press

Kyaw said tidal waves killed most of the victims in that region.

Earlier, Foreign Minister Nyan Win was quoted by state-run television as saying that more than 10,000 people had perished in Irrawaddy while a smaller number died in and around Yangon, the country’s largest city.

“News and data are still being collected, so there may be many more casualties,” he said.

It was not known why the two ministers presented different death tolls.

Residents walked through flooded streets in Yangon on Saturday. The cyclone smashed urban buildings and obliterated villages early Saturday. With roads blocked and power and telephone lines down, the authorities were assessing the damage and foreign aid groups were mobilizing for a disaster the full extent of which was still not yet fully clear.

Photo: Khin Maung Win/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The World Food Program, which was preparing to fly in food, added its own grim assessment of the destruction: Up to 1 million people may be homeless, some villages have been almost totally eradicated and vast rice-growing areas are wiped out.

A state television report gave two different numbers — 59 and 130 — for the dead in what is known as Yangon division. It did not explain the differing tolls.

Fishing boats crushed by a tropical cyclone in the port of Yangon on Sunday. Winds reached 120 miles per hour. Earlier, the government had reported that 351 people had been killed, but foreign aid officials had warned that this number was sure to rise as reports came in from remote areas.

Photo: Khin Maung Win/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The country’s ruling junta, which has spurned the international community for decades, urgently appealed for foreign aid at a meeting Nyan Win held with diplomats Monday in Yangon.

The U.N.’s emergency relief coordinator said Tuesday the government had indicated it was ready to start accepting international aid. The U.N., Red Cross and other aid organizations have been organizing supplies in preparation for shipping them to the country.

Monks helped clear debris. Witnesses said the government was slow to address the disaster, and exile groups said some residents had told them they were angry about the weak response of the military, which just nine months ago carried out a violent crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrations led by monks.

Photo: Zhang Yunfei/Xinhua, via Associated Press

Some aid agencies reported their assessment teams had reached some areas of the largely isolated region but said getting in supplies and large numbers of aid workers would be difficult.

A military transport plane flew from Bangkok to Yangon Tuesday with emergency aid from Thailand while a number of other countries and organizations said they were prepared to follow.

Residents tried to rebuild their homes on the outskirts of Yangon on Sunday. “What is clear is that we are dealing with a major emergency situation and the priority needs now are shelter and clean drinking water, ” said Richard Horsey, a spokesman for the United Nations disaster response office in Bangkok.

Photo: Khin Maung Win/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Richard Horsey, Bangkok-based spokesman for the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Aid, said Yangon’s airport is the closest to the region hardest hit.

“For those places accessible by land, there will be cars and trucks from those areas to meet at the halfway point with vehicles from Yangon,” he said. “For remote areas, assessment teams and assistance teams will need to go by helicopters and boats.”

The immediate problem now in affected areas was survival, with water and electricity cut off, roads blocked by fallen trees, roofs torn off homes and prices for transportation and food rising fast.

Photo: Reuters

The delta is riddled with waterways but Horsey said they are not easily accessible, even during normal times.

Based on a satellite map made available by the United Nations, the storm’s damage was concentrated over about a 11,600-square-mile (30,000-square-kilometer) area along the Andaman Sea and Gulf of Martaban coastlines — less than 5 percent of the country.

In an e-mail message from the main city, Yangon, one resident reported: “Stories get worse by the hour. No drinking water in many areas, still no power. Houses completely disappeared. Refugees scavenging for food in poorer areas. Roofing, building supplies, tools – all are scarce and prices sky-rocketing on everything.”

Photo: Zhang Yunfei/Xinhua, via Reuters

But the affected region is home to nearly a quarter of Myanmar’s 57 million people.

Images from state television showed large trees and electricity poles sprawled across roads and roofless houses ringed by large sheets of water in the delta region, which is regarded as Myanmar’s rice bowl.

A line for drinking water in Yangon on Monday.

Photo: Will Baxter/World Picture Network

“More or less all the landlines are down and it’s extremely difficult to get information from cyclone-affected areas. But from the reports we are getting, entire villages have been flattened and the final death toll may be huge,” said Mac Pieczowski, who heads the International Organization for Migration office in Yangon, in a statement.

People are starving,” an unidentified resident was quoted as saying by the Democratic Voice of Burma, a dissident radio station based in Norway. “Fuel is becoming scarce,” the resident was quoted as saying. “People are likely to die of starvation. If international help doesn’t come within a week, it will be impossible to survive. There will be nothing left to eat.”

Photo: Khin Maung Win/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

State radio reported Saturday’s vote on a draft constitution would be delayed until May 24 in 40 townships around Yangon and seven in the Irrawaddy delta, which bore the brunt of the killer storm.

It indicated that in other areas the balloting would proceed as scheduled.

The appeal for assistance was unusual for Myanmar’s ruling generals, who have long been suspicious of the international organizations and have closely controlled their activities.

Foreign governments were poised Tuesday to rush aid to the devastated nation.

This handout photo made on May 4, 2008, and released Monday, ...

Labor Residential Area in Shan Kyaung Ward on the outskirts of Rangoon following the cyclone, in Hlaing Township

The United States, which has slapped economic sanctions on the country, said it likewise stood ready. The U.S. Embassy is providing $250,000 in immediate aid from existing emergency fund. But first lady Laura Bush said Monday the U.S. would provide further aid only if one of its own disaster teams is allowed into the country.

The European Commission was providing $3 million in humanitarian aid while the president of neighboring China, Hu Jintao, promised $1 million in cash and supplies.

Residents collect water in Yangon on May 05. Myanmar's military ...

Residents collect water in Yangon

The government had apparently taken few efforts to prepare for the storm, which came bearing down on the country from the Bay of Bengal late Friday. Weather warnings broadcast on television would have been largely useless for the worst-hit rural areas where electricity supply is spotty and television a rarity.

“The government misled people,” said Thin Thin, a grocery story owner in Yangon. “They could have warned us about the severity of the coming cyclone so we could be better prepared.”

Buddhist monks move branches from an uprooted tree blocking ...

Buddhist monks move branches from an uprooted tree blocking a street in Yangon

Yangon was without electricity except where gas-fed generators were available and residents lined up to buy candles, which have doubled in price since the storm hit. Most homes were without water, forcing families to stand in long lines for drinking water and bathe in the city’s lakes.

Most telephone landlines appeared to be restored by late Monday, but mobile phones and Internet connections were down.

Residents are seen near uprooted trees and downed power lines ...

Residents are seen near uprooted trees

Some in Yangon complained that the 400,000-strong military was only clearing streets where the ruling elite resided but leaving residents, including Buddhist monks, to cope on their own in most other areas.

Myanmar has been under military rule since 1962. Its government has been widely criticized for suppression of pro-democracy parties such as the one led by Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been under house arrest for almost 12 of the past 18 years.

At least 31 people were killed and thousands more were detained when the military cracked down on peaceful protests in September led by Buddhist monks and democracy advocates.

 Radio Netherlands

Myanmar death toll rises to 22,000

Published: Tuesday 06 May 2008 12:10 UTC
Last updated: Tuesday 06 May 2008 12:17 UTC

Map of Myanmar showing path of Cyclone Nargis and worst-hit ...Yangon – The authorities in Myanmar now put the death toll in the wake of Cyclone Nargis at over 22,000, amid fears that it will rise further. In the town of Bogalay alone, an estimated 10,000 people lost their lives as a result of the storm.

The authorities previously reported between 10,000 and 15,000 deaths. The number of people reported missing has risen to 41,000. Millions of people are still without water and electricity. The full scale of the disaster will only become clear as news emerges of the situation in remote areas.

The military regime has decided to postpone a referendum on the country’s new constitution for two weeks in the worst affected areas. In the rest of the country, the vote is due to go ahead as planned on Saturday. The opposition National League for Democracy wants the referendum to be postponed altogether.

Myanmar’s military regime is now allowing emergency aid from the United Nations into the country, although it is not clear whether aid workers will also be admitted. Many countries and international organisations have pledged aid, including the United States, Australia and the European Union.  

The first cyclone of the 2008 season in the northern Indian ...

Report: 10,000 Dead In Single Myanmar Town

(CBS/AP) Myanmar’s official media said Tuesday that 10,000 people were killed by a cyclone in just one town, confirming fears of a spiraling death toll from the storm’s 12-foot tidal surges and high winds that swept away bamboo homes in low-lying coastal regions.

The ruling junta, an authoritarian regime which cut the nation off from the international community for decades, appealed for foreign aid to help in the recovery from Saturday’s disaster, the country’s deadliest storm on record.

In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, residents ...

Residents queue to get water after the cyclone in Yongon

The casualty count has been rising quickly as authorities reach hard-hit islands and villages in the Irrawaddy delta, the country’s major rice-producing region, which bore the brunt of Cyclone Nargis’s 120-mile-per hour winds.

Myanmar Foreign Minister told diplomats in Yangon Monday that, overall, more than 10,000 people may have died when Cyclone Nargis struck Saturday.

Children sit on the branch of an uprooted tree outside a house ...

Children sit on the branch of an uprooted tree outside a house in Yangon May 5, 2008

But on Tuesday, state television confirmed fears of a rapidly rising toll, reporting that 10,000 perished in the town of Bogalay in the country’s Irrawaddy delta.

The cyclone came just a week before a crucial referendum on a military-backed constitution that the ruling junta hoped would go smoothly in its favor, despite opposition from the country’s feisty pro-democracy movement.

The disaster could stir the already tense political situation ahead of a referendum on a draft charter, several analysts said.

Uprooted trees are seen in Yangon. The United States said Monday ...

Uprooted trees are seen in Yangon.

No one knows how many are now homeless, reports CBS News correspondent Barry Petersen. Estimates range from 90,000 and up.

Hundreds of thousands of people are without clean drinking water, said Richard Horsey, a spokesman in Bangkok, Thailand for the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

The disaster puts the government’s credibility on the line, as general anger could build if relief efforts are not accelerated.

Residents queue to get drinking water in Yangon. The United ...

Residents queue to get drinking water in Yangon

There was little sign of official efforts to repair the damage in Yangon, but the worst-hit areas were in the countryside, now inaccessible by road because of storm damage.

“The combination of the cyclone and the referendum within a few days of each other makes an angry population angrier and vulnerable and makes the political situation more volatile” than it has been since last year’s massive pro-democracy demonstrations, said Monique Skidmore, a Myanmar expert at Australian National University.

Last September, at least 31 people were killed and thousands more were detained when the military cracked down on peaceful protests led by Buddhist monks and democracy advocates.

Monks clear fallen trees from a road in Yangon after Cyclone ...

Monks clear fallen trees from a road in Yangon

“This is not likely to change anything, but this might just add to the discontent that is so evident in the society,” said David Steinberg, a Myanmar expert at Georgetown University.

Relief Minister Maj. Gen. Maung Maung Swe said at the meeting with diplomats that the referendum could be postponed by “a few days” in the worst-affected areas, but state media indicated Monday that the May 10 date was still set.

The diplomats said they were told Myanmar welcomed international humanitarian aid including urgently needed roofing materials, medicine, water purifying tablets and mosquito nets. The first shipment of 9 tons was scheduled to arrive from Thailand on Tuesday.

Map showing the areas worst affected by cyclone Nargis. Myanmar ...

 

The appeal for assistance was unusual for Myanmar’s ruling generals, who have long been suspicious of the international organizations and have closely controlled their activities. Several agencies, including the International Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders, have limited their presence as a consequence.

Allowing any major influx of foreigners could carry risks for the military, injecting unwanted outside influence and giving the aid givers rather than the junta credit for a recovery. However, keeping out international aid would focus blame squarely on the military should it fail to restore peoples’ livelihoods.

A resident of Yangon races for cover during as cyclone Nargis ...

A resident of Yangon races for cover during as cyclone Nargis slams into the former capital of Myanmar Saturday, May 3, 2008

The cyclone was the greatest recorded natural disaster in Myanmar, also known as Burma, since a storm killed 2,700 people in 1926.

The government had apparently taken few efforts to prepare for the storm, which came bearing down on the country from the Bay of Bengal late Friday. Weather warnings were broadcast on television saying that winds could reach 120-150 mph and tides could rise as much as 12 feet above normal levels.

The bulletins did not urge citizens to take shelter.

A Myanmar Buddhist Monk makes his way past a fallen tree following ...

A Myanmar Buddhist Monk makes his way past a fallen tree

Attempts to alert the public via the television would have been largely fruitless anyway because the electricity supply is so spotty in Myanmar that few households, especially in poor rural areas, would have seen the warning.

No firsthand reports have emerged from the worst hit areas of the delta, which are barely above sea level. The government has not given information on the cause of most of the deaths, but bamboo shanties with thatch or zinc roofs are standard housing in the area, and would have been swept way with their inhabitants by the onrushing tidal surge.

“Once the storm subsided, people were walking out to assess the damage and were shocked at everything around them,” said Pamela Sitko, communication relief manager for the Asia-Pacific region for the private aid agency World Vision. “One 11-year-old boy said he had to run backwards to take shelter in a school during the storm because the wind was so strong.”

Residents make their way through fallen trees Sunday, May 4, ...

Residents make their way through fallen trees

World Vision said Myanmar’s government had invited it “to provide assistance in the form of zinc sheets, tents, tarpaulins and medicine.”

“The agency is coordinating with authorities to explore an airlift of emergency supplies into the country from one of its global warehouses,” the group said in a statement.

“The biggest concern is communication because the electricity is down, running water has stopped, phone lines are down and it is difficult to assess the real needs because we can’t reach the outer-lying regions,” said Sitko.

A bicycle taxi driver moves along through a damaged area of ...

A bicycle taxi driver moves along through a damaged area of Yangon

Shari Villarosa, U.S. Charge D’Affairs in Rangoon, told CBS Radio News that once the storm cleared out, people were overwhelmed by the extent of the devastation.

“Everybody came out and was just stunned,” Villarosa said. “People on my compound, who have been here 15 years, told me they have never seen anything like this here ever.”

Residents of Yangon, a city of some 6.5 million, said they were angry that the government failed to properly warn them of the approaching storm and has so far done little to alleviate their plight.

ADDS detail map showing hardest-hit region with path of Cyclone ...

“The government misled people. They could have warned us about the severity of the coming cyclone so we could be better prepared,” said Thin Thin, a grocery store owner.

Yangon, where officials said 59 people died, was without electricity except where gas-fed generators were available and residents lined up to buy candles at double last week’s prices.

Downed power lines are strewn along a street of Yangon on May ...

Downed power lines are strewn along a street of Yangon on May 4

With pumps not working, most homes were without water, forcing families to stand in long lines for drinking water and bathe in the city’s lakes.

Most telephone land lines appeared to be restored by late Monday, but mobile phones and Internet connections were down.

With the city plunged into almost total darkness overnight, security concerns mounted, and many shops sold their goods through partially opened doors or iron grills. Looting was reported at several fresh food markets, where thieves took vegetables and other items.

In this photo released by Democratic Voice of Burma, a fallen ...

Some in Yangon complained that the 400,000-strong military was only clearing streets where the ruling elite resided but leaving residents, including Buddhist monks, to cope on their own in most other areas.

“There are some army trucks out to clear the roads, but most of the work was done with a dah (knife) by the people. But some of these tree trunks are 4 feet thick,” said Barry Broman, a retired U.S. State Department officer who was visiting Yangon when the cyclone struck. “Thousands of trees were uprooted. All the roads were blocked by the trees.”

Destroyed fishing boats at the port of Yangon after cylone Nargis ...

At Yangon’s notorious Insein prison, 36 prisoners were killed and about 70 others wounded when guards opened fire during a moment of chaos when the storm hit Saturday, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, an activist exile group based in Thailand.

Diplomats in Yangon gave a similar account, though a government official denied there were any deaths. Nearby residents said there had been a fire at the prison, but knew no other details.

This photo released by the Democratic Voice of Burma shows people ...

Although relief talks with the government were still ongoing, the U.N.’s Horsey said it appeared the United Nations had the green light to send in a team to assess the storm’s damage as early as Tuesday.

In Washington, the State Department said the U.S. Embassy in Yangon had declared the situation a “disaster” and authorized an emergency contribution of $250,000 to help with relief efforts. But it added that Myanmar’s government had initially refused to allow a U.S. Disaster Assistance Response Team into the country to assess damage.

A television grab from May 4, 2008 shows a tree fallen onto ...

Washington has long been one of the ruling junta’s sharpest critics for its poor human rights record and failure to hand over power to a democratically elected government.

Myanmar has been under military rule since 1962. Its government has been widely criticized for suppression of pro-democracy parties such as the one led by Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been under house arrest for almost 12 of the past 18 years.

Nearly 22,500 killed in violent cyclone in Myanmar

China Views 2008-05-06 19:50:46

Flooded villages are seen in this aerial view near an airport in Yangon, May 5, 2008, after Cyclone Nargis slammed into Myanmar’s main city on Saturday, ripping off roofs, felling trees and raising fears of major casualties.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
Photo Gallery>>>

 

YANGON, May 6 (Xinhua) — A total of 22,464 people have been killed in two divisions of Yangon and Ayeyawaddy in Cyclone Nargisthat swept Myanmar’s five divisions and states last Friday and Saturday, state radio reported Tuesday evening, quoting an updated figure released at noon.

Men assess damage caused by a cyclone in central Yangon on May ...

    Among the victims, 21,793 are in Ayeyawaddy division, while 671in Yangon division.

    A total of 41,054 are still missing — 40,695 in Ayeyawaddy division and 359 in Yangon division, the report said, adding that 670 were injured in the Yangon division alone.

In this photo released by Democratic Voice of Burma, showing ...

    The deadly cyclone, which occurred over the Bay of Bengal, hit five divisions and states — Yangon, Bago, Ayeyawaddy, Kayin and Mon, of which Ayeyawaddy and Yangon sustained the most casualties.

    Myanmar declared the five divisions and states as natural-disaster-hit regions a day after the cyclone hit the country.

In this photo released by Democratic Voice of Burma, showing ...

    However, Bago, Mon and Kayin as well as some five townships of Yangon division and 19 townships of Ayeyawaddy division were withdrawn from being the natural-disaster-hit areas on Tuesday with a claim that these areas have basically returned to normal, according to an earlier official announcement on Tuesday afternoon.

In this photo released by Democratic Voice of Burma, a fallen ...

    A total of 40 townships in Yangon division and seven townships in Ayeyawaddy division still remain as natural-disaster-hit areas.

In this photo released by Democratic Voice of Burma, giant billboard ...

 A look at Myanmar’s cyclone-devastated Irrawaddy delta

Overview of the Irrawaddy Delta, the region of Myanmar hardest hit by Cyclone Nargis:

THE DEATH TOLL: Of the 22,000 dead so far, as many as 21,793 were from the Irrawaddy delta. Another 40,695 of the 41,000 missing also came from the region.

THE GEOGRAPHY: Located on the tip of the country’s western coast, the Irrawaddy delta is a low-lying region where as many as 6 million people live. An additional 6.5 million people live in Yangon, the country’s former capital, located on the edge of the delta. The mighty Irrawaddy River branches out into numerous tributaries to form the delta, which is also criss-crossed by canals and wetlands.

THE ECONOMY: The fertile region of the Irrawaddy Delta is considered the country’s rice bowl, where mangrove forests long ago were converted into paddy fields. Once the world’s top rice producer, the country produced only about 40,000 tons for export last year.

Rice production plummeted after Myanmar’s military regime nationalized agriculture following the 1962 military takeover, forcing farmers to sell to the state at below-market prices. Production improved after rice growing and trading was liberalized in the 1990s, but never reached anywhere near earlier highs.