Calling for an immediate international intervention in Burma

National Campaign for Food and Freedom

Statement of global Burmese democratic forces and supporters

Calling for an immediate international intervention

by creating a coalition of willing

for food and freedoms in Burma

 

 

 

 

May 28, 2008

 

We, Burmese democratic organizations, along with Burma campaign groups  around the world are_

  • calling for an immediate international intervention in Burma,
  • reminding the international community that this is the time to bring a change in the military-ruled country.

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Junta says that foreign aid is not needed; Nargis survivors can live on frogs

Junta says that foreign aid is not needed;

Nargis survivors can live on frogs

From Moe Thee Zun

Myanmar state media resumes its attack on western nations:

they are without humanitarian spirit if they continue to link economic aid to relief workers access to the worst hit areas. (Because SPDC could not get 99% as commission for aid delivery. The Myanmar Tatmadaw had already decided generously to hand ove 1%of donated aids to victims.)

The government censures all information relating to Nargis.

Yangon (AsiaNews) – Myanmar’s survivors of cyclone Nargis “do not need foreign food aid; they can feed themselves on frogs and fish that abound in the worst hit areas”.  

The New Light of Myanmar newspaper, a government mouthpiece, has re-launched its attack on foreign relief workers and condemned donors for “linking aid money to full access to the hardest-hit regions in the Irrawaddy Delta”.

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UN: Myanmar junta forcing storm victims from camps

UN: Myanmar junta forcing storm victims from camps

The Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar’s military government is removing cyclone victims from refugee camps and dumping them near their devastated villages with virtually no aid supplies, the United Nations said Friday.

In an aid agency meeting, the U.N. Children’s Fund said eight camps earlier set up by the government to receive homeless victims in the Irrawaddy delta town of Bogalay had emptied as the mass clear-out of victims was stepped up.

People line up outside an aid tent in Yangon, Myanmar, Thursday, May 29, 2008 awaiting medical treatment. Aid and relief has been slow getting to affected areas and people after a cyclone hit southern Myanmar causing mass destruction and death. (AP Photo)

“The government is moving people unannounced,” said Teh Tai Ring, a UNICEF official, adding that authorities were “dumping people in the approximate location of the villages, basically with nothing.”

Camps were also being closed in Labutta, another town in the delta, a low-lying area which took the brunt of Cyclone Nargis nearly a month ago.

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Rule of law

Rule of law

From Wikipedia

The rule of law, in its most basic form, is the principle that no one is above the law. Thomas Paine stated in his pamphlet Common Sense (1776): “For as in absolute governments the king is law, so in free countries the law ought to be king; and there ought to be no other.”

In England, the issuing of the Magna Carta was a prime example of the “rule of law.” The Great Charter forced King John to submit to the law and succeeded in putting limits on feudal fees and duties.

Perhaps the most important application of the rule of law is the principle that_

governmental authority is legitimately exercised only in accordance with written, publicly disclosed laws adopted and enforced in accordance with established procedural steps that are referred to as due process.

The principle is intended to be a safeguard against arbitrary governance, whether by a totalitarian leader or by mob rule.

Thus, the rule of law is hostile both to dictatorship and to anarchy. Samuel Rutherford was one of the first modern authors to give the principle theoretical foundations, in Lex, Rex (1644), and later Montesquieu in The Spirit of the Laws (1748).

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My comments posted on Tun Dr M’s, “THE RULE OF LAW”

Dr Mahathir Mohamad

Read my comments posted on Tun’s following article_

Assalamualaikum Tun,

 

TQ Tun again for the interview about Burma Politics granted to us. Tun’s wise third party vision and guidance are invaluable for us. But sadly Junta and opposition are not in a position for give-and-take policy for the benefit of the people. And both are keener to lord over the minority races and religious groups.

 

I am glad after reading Tun’s Rule of Law. I hope the present and future Malaysian governments would emphasize on amending or upgrading all the Laws, Rules and Regulations to be fair and give justice to all the citizens including all the foreigners here.

 

As a foreigner, when looking from our side, I feel that we are treated unfairly with xenophobic short sightedness here. It is even worse for the Burmese/Myanmars here because even Burmese Muslims are treated as 10th grade foreigners here. There is discrimination every where. We are not asking the privileges of the citizens but requesting to be treated equally as all other foreigners.

 

I hope Tun could push for the amendments of all the laws/rules/regulations/government circulars and orders to be written clearly so all the foreigners are treated equally.

 

We are pleased with Tun’s comments about ASEAN Charter’s Integration policy.

 

Thanking Your Honour

Yours Humbly

Wasalaam

 

Dr San Oo Aung

THE RULE OF LAW

Malaysia is a country which practices the rule of law. Our laws must cover every aspect of our societal life, so we will know exactly what we can do and what we cannot do. Prime Ministers in particular must have everything spelt out for them in this respect. This will enable them to be charged if they had breached the rule of law long after they had retired.
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Myanmar criticized for still hindering foreign aid

People line up outside an aid tent in Yangon, Myanmar, Thursday, May 29, 2008 awaiting medical treatment. Aid and relief has been slow getting to affected areas and people after a cyclone hit southern Myanmar causing mass destruction and death. (AP Photo)

People line up outside an aid tent in Yangon, Myanmar, Thursday, May 29, 2008 awaiting medical treatment. Aid and relief has been slow getting to affected areas and people after a cyclone hit southern Myanmar causing mass destruction and death. (AP Photo)

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Human rights and aid groups complained Friday that Myanmar’s military government was still hindering the free flow of international help for victims of Cyclone Nargis.

Some foreign aid staff were still waiting for permission to enter the hardest-hit Irrawaddy delta while the regime continues to review entry requests for 48 hours, the groups said.

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Burma: It Can’t Wait – Sylvester Stallone – Day 21

source:USCAMPAIGNFORBURMA.ORG

Cyclone survivors victimised by Myanmar soldiers

 Cyclone survivors victimised by
Myanmar soldiers

 May 29, 2008 PYAPON (Myanmar) –

PYAPON, Myanmar (AP) — It’s not much, but the flimsy bamboo lean-to on the side of the road is all Aye Shwe has to keep his family dry. They lost their home to the cyclone and may soon be uprooted again — this time by soldiers ordering them to leave.

A 93-year-old cyclone survivor, is seen, in Pyapon town, Delta region of Myanmar, Monday, May 26, 2008   (photo:AP)

Three weeks after the storm, survivors say they are being victimized again, by a military regime that has forced some to return to flooded, collapsed homes and others to labor on reconstruction projects. Continue reading

Myanmar officially adopts new military-backed constitution

YANGON, Myanmar: Military-ruled Myanmar has adopted a new constitution through a referendum that critics note was held in the aftermath of a severe cyclone while hundreds of thousands of victims were receiving little or no aid from the government.

State media reported Thursday that the constitution, which gives the military widespread powers, was overwhelmingly approved in the national referendum. The vote was held May 10, about a week after the May 2-3 cyclone. Continue reading

Care Latte with the Home Minister of Malaysia:

Care Latte with the Home Minister:

Homing in on Home issues

www.wongchunwai.com

 

 

Extracts only. Sunday, 20 April 2008  

Datuk Seri Syed Hamid Albar is responsible for one of the most important, if not powerful, ministries in the Cabinet. Speaking to The Star’s Group Chief Editor, he talked about his tasks from heading law enforcement agencies to deciding on the role of the media, his upcoming plans for the ministry, Umno, and the country’s political outlook.

What are your plans for the Home Ministry?

Syed Hamid: The Home Ministry is the second biggest with a staff of 159,000.

  • Now we are more open to public scrutiny.
  • This is a challenging and interesting ministry and it’s close to the people’s hearts.

If you talk on matters of_

  • immigration, visas, passports,
  • the National Registration Department,
  • permanent residence
  • and citizenship status,

all are in the limelight. Continue reading