Mae Sot Commemorates 8.8.88 Anniversary

By VIOLET CHO

Friday, August 8, 2008

US first lady Laura Bush, left, is escorted by founder of the Mae Tao clinic Dr. Cynthia Maung, 2nd left, during her visit on August 7 to the clinic which provide free treatment for the sick and wounded Burmese migrant workers in Mae Sot town near the Thai-Burmese border.(Photo: AP)

MAE SOT — The Burmese community here commemorated the 20th anniversary of the 8.8.88 uprising on Friday, honoring average Burmese citizens, students and monks who scarified their lives for political change in Burma.

U Pyinya Zawta, a leader of the All Burma Monks Alliance, challenged his audience when he raised a question, asking why the goals of democracy and peace have not been achieved even though there are many more Burmese organizations working toward the goal.

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Why do SPDC Generals never resign?

Why do SPDC Generals never resign?

Adapted and Burmanized from Star Online article by HUZIR SULAIMAN

 

By global standards of ministerial responsibility, SPDC General’s performance leaves much to be desired.

THE Westminster Parliamentary system, for better or for worse, is our former colonial masters’ gift to us, and to many Commonwealth countries.

According to its conventions, Cabinet ministers are bound by both collective and individual responsibility.

  • Collective ministerial responsibility means that the Cabinet must speak with one voice.
  • Whatever disagreements may take place behind closed doors, there must be a united front on policy matters in public.

 

The Westminster principle of individual ministerial responsibility, however, is probably of greater concern to us. It is explained by Rodney Brazier in his 1997 book, Ministers of the Crown:

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Big bully Russia cowardly invaded a small nation, Georgia

Big bully Russia cowardly invaded a small nation, Georgia

The Star Online news by By Nikolai Pavlov 

 

GORI, Georgia (Reuters) – Russian forces battled Georgian troops in a breakaway part of Georgia in intensified fighting that sparked alarm in the West and heated exchanges at the United Nations reminiscent of the Cold War.

An armoured vehicle on fire in the separatist capital of South Ossetia Tskhinvali is seen in this image from television footage by RTR Russian Television Channel, August 8, 2008. (REUTERS/Reuters Television)

After more than a day of fighting in South Ossetia, Russian media reported overnight shelling of the regional capital, Tskhinvali. They said Georgian forces were responsible.

Each side blamed the other for the fighting in the pro-Moscow enclave, which broke from Georgia as the Soviet Union neared collapse in the early 1990s, but has no international recognition.

The president of the separatist region, nestled in the Caucasus mountains, said 1,400 people had been killed. Moscow said its troops were responding to a Georgian assault to take back the region.

The United States, a big backer of ex-Soviet Georgia which has swung onto a pro-Western course under President Mikheil Saakashvili, called for an immediate Russian pullout.

“We deplore the Russian military action in Georgia, which is a violation of Georgian sovereignty and territorial integrity,” U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad told reporters on the sidelines of a heated Security Council debate.

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No man is an island

No man is an island

Self-sufficiency is just day-dreaming/chasing the rainbow only

Malaysia Insider article by John Lee

 

UG 9 — Every so often, a prominent politician or social activist will take the stage and bemoan our dependence on some other party — whether they be another country, another ethnic group — for food, clothes, or any other necessity of life you can name. The rallying call for self-sufficiency is a resounding, clarion call; it is also an unfortunately deeply mistaken one.

In theory self-sufficiency sounds like a good, harmless idea: why shouldn’t we rely on ourselves, rather than having to go to someone else for the things we need? Prime Ministers have decried the necessity for Malays to buy clothes from Chinese textile manufacturers; social activists have opposed the privatisation of water companies lest they fall into foreign hands; politicians far and wide have suggested we should aim for self-sufficiency in rice. What’s wrong with self-sufficiency?

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Arrests on 8-8-88 anniversary in Burma

48 activists were arrested for a protest march marking 20 years since the army crushed an “8-8-88” democracy uprising with the loss of an estimated 3,000 lives

The group of mainly young men in t-shirts bearing the numbers 8-8-88 a reference to the Aug. 8, 1988 nationwide revolt staged a silent walk through the northwest town of Taunggok before being stopped by a police barricade.

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