786 symbol is used as a substitute for Bismillah or “In the name of Allah” or “In the name of God”

 786 symbol is used as a substitute for Bismillah

“In the name of Allah” or “In the name of God”

The Arabic letters of the opening phrase of the Qur’an sum to the numerical value 786 in the system of Abjad numerals. Not all Muslims place emphasis on this numerological analysis; however, some — mostly in Pakistan, India, Myanmar and Bangladesh — use 786 as a substitute for Bismillah (“In the name of Allah” or “In the name of God”).

Numerology

The total value of the letters of “Bismillah al-Rahman al-Rahim” according to one Arabic system of numerology is 786.
 
There are two methods of arranging the letters of the Arabic alphabet. One method is the most common alphabetical order (used for most ordinary purposes), beginning with the letters Alif ا, ba ب, ta ت, tha ث etc.

The other method is known as the Abjad numerals’ method or ordinal method. In this method the letters are arranged in the following order: Abjad, Hawwaz, Hutti, Kalaman, Sa’fas, Qarshat, Sakhaz, Zazagh; and each letter has an arithmetic value assigned to it from one to one thousand.
(This arrangement was done, most probably in the 3rd century of Hijrah during the ‘Abbasid period, following the practices of speakers of other Semitic languages such as Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, Chaldean etc.)

If you take the numeric values of all the letters of the Basmala, according to the Abjad order, the total will be 786.

In the Indian subcontinent the Abjad numerals have become quite popular. Some people, mostly in India and Pakistan, use 786 as a substitute for Bismillah (“In the name of Allah” or “In the name of God”).

They write this number to avoid writing the name of God, or Qur’anic verses on ordinary papers, which can be subject to dirt or come in contact with ‘unclean’ materials. This practice does not date from the time of Muhammad and is not universally accepted by Muslims. 

Uses of the Abjad system

Before the introduction of the Hindu-Arabic numerals, the Abjad numbers were used for all mathematical purposes. In modern Arabic, they are primarily used for numbering outlines, items in lists, and points of information. In English, points of information are sometimes referred to as “A”, “B”, and “C”, and in Arabic, they are “أ‎”, then “ب‎”, then “ج‎”, not the first three letters of the modern hijāʼī order.

The Abjad numbers are also used to assign numerical values to Arabic words for purposes of numerology. The common Islamic phrase بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم bism illāh ir-ramān ir-raḥīm (“in the name of God, the merciful, the compassionate” – see Basmala) has a numeric value of 786 (from a letter-by-letter cumulative value of 2+60+40 + 1+30+30+5 + 1+30+200+8+40+50 + 1+30+200+8+10+40), and the word “Allah” (God) by itself has the value 66 (1+30+30+5).

ā/’ ا 1 y/ī ي 10 q ق 100
b ب 2 k ك 20 r ر 200
j ج 3 l ل 30 sh ش 300
d د 4 m م 40 t ت 400
h ه 5 n ن 50 th ث 500
w/ū و 6 s س 60 kh خ 600
z ز 7 ` ع 70 dh ذ 700
H ح 8 f ف 80 D ض 800
T ط 9 S ص 90 Z ظ 900
        gh غ 1000

A few of the numerical values are different in the alternative abjad order. 

Source Myanmar Muslim.net…………..by Myint Myat Thu     clear.ariya@gmail.com

 

 

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