Happy Merdeka, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, Please use your liberty to promote ours and freedom of Daw Suu

  

 Happy Merdeka, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad 

Please use your liberty to promote ours and freedom of Daw Suutugu_negara8_001

  

Merdeka means Independence but we Burmese and especially I have the pleasant memories once we heard the word Merdeka. We even had a “Pavlov” like reaction when we hear this word Merdeka.

ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE 

WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

 

ASEAN leaders are complaining about the convenient way to solve the Rohingya problem.

But for the Rohingyas or Burmese Muslims or Christian Chins/Karens/Kachins and Buddhist Mons/Shans/Burmese etc AND the NLDS  and political opponents and armed rebel groups_

Whether the SPDC would accept them back is not their main concern. What is the consequences after repatriation is their only problem.

Jailed? Tortured? Is the main concern for all but ‘Village arrest’ (for Rohingyas only) is the problem.

No democracy, no Human Rights, no political life, no respect for the Rights of religious minorities and Ethnic minorities is their main concern.

But the lack of development, economic problems back home are the most important fact for all of them.

There is no clear cut line to DEFINE OR CATEGORIZE THEM INTO POLITICAL OR ECONOMIC MIGRANTS. 

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M’sia offers to help minority Malays in other countries BUT IGNORED THE MUSLIMS OF OTHER RACES EVEN INSIDE THEIR COUNTRY

M’sia offers to help minority Malays in other countries

BUT IGNORED THE MUSLIMS OF OTHER RACES

EVEN INSIDE THEIR COUNTRY

COMMENT: Malaysian government used to ignore the Myanmar/Burmese Muslim migrants in their country.

Red tape and toll gates managed by ‘Little Napoleons’ everywhere

This is against the Islamic teaching and the UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS CONCEPT.

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Asean’s day dream or nightmare

Asean’s day dream or nightmare

Malaysiakini’s article by Josh Hong 

Extracts only

At an academic conference some years ago in Seoul, South Korea, Chua Beng Huat, a sociology professor at the National University of Singapore, remarked that Asean as a regional grouping had achieved nothing over the last few decades.

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Deafening silence from Malaysia regarding Myanmar Cyclone?

Deafening silence from Malaysia regarding Myanmar Cyclone?

 

First of all I wish to apologize if I am wrong.

 

If Malaysian Government had already sent the condolence note to Myanmar, I am sorry for writing this.

 

If Malaysian Government, GLCs (government Linked companies), NST, TV3, NTV7, RTM and NGOs (esp. government affiliated) had already started a campaign to help Myanmar, please accept my  apology for wrongly writing this posting.

 

If you all haven’t done anything, it is shame on you.

 

We don’t want a cent from you Kaisu Malaysia!

 

 

We know that we are not Orang Puteh (Whiteman) , no Arab blood and have no Malay-Indonesian blood. We are ALWAYS discriminated in your country.

 

Never mind if you do not wish to recognize the undocumented workers/migrants and asylum seekers.

 

During the great disaster in Myanmar, I hope if Malaysian government could do the followings to help us without spending a cent.

 

Please announce amnesty on all the Myanmar/Burmese undocumented workers/migrants and asylum seekers including those already in the detention camp. (At least if they could work and earn, they could help their families, relatives and friends.)

 

You could put a time limit for example six months to one year.

It is shameful that you are heartless to continue arresting and some of your agents are harassing them daily.

 

Dr San Oo Aung

 

17 Myanmar Illegal Immigrants Held In Kelantan

BERNAMA, RANTAU PANJANG, May 6 (Bernama) — The Anti- Smuggling Unit (UPP) Tuesday arrested 17 Myanmar nationals without valid travel documents in Kampung Kempas, Machang, as they were being smuggled into the country by a syndicate.

Kelantan UPP commander Mazlan Che Hamid said the Myanmar nationals, aged between 16 and 30 years, had been turned over to the Immigration authorities.

He said the van driver, a Malaysian, stopped the vehicle by the roadside and fled after realising that it was being tailed by UPP personnel at 4.30 am.

The UPP personnel had followed the van from Kampung Kedap here, some 40 km from Machang, he said.

— BERNAMA

Gambari diplomatically hiding his failure

 Gambari diplomatically hiding his failure

Note: The heading is my own idea. But the following newspaper’s facts and idea are not contrary to my heading. 

From what he has said and from what the military junta expressed to him during his third visit, United Nations Special Envoy Ibrahim Gambari is unlikely to have achieved anything toward national reconciliation and democracy in military run Burma.

The Nation, Published on March 13, 2008

Gambari finished his latest visit to the troubled country on Monday, making a brief stopover in Singapore – but without meeting any officials of the current Asean chair, or the media. The reaction after the visit was different from his usual routine following his previous trips. For Burma affairs, nothing is top secret for the UN representative, unless he has nothing to say or nothing has been achieved.

Gambari met many people during his stay in Burma from last Thursday to Monday, including opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, whom he met twice this time, on Sunday and Monday. However, the details of their discussion are not yet known. Previously, Gambari rushed to tell the media whenever he got a statement from Aung San Suu Kyi that she was ready to talk with the junta over political reconciliation. The UN envoy then shuttled around the globe to tell the same thing to world leaders whom he expected to help him bring about a dialogue between Burma and those in Bangkok, Beijing and New Delhi.

This time Gambari got a very tough assignment from his boss, UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon, to achieve a substantive dialogue between the junta and the opposition. Actually the authorities in the Burmese capital, Napyidaw were originally scheduled to welcome Gambari in April, but the secretary-general made a request to have his special envoy visit early.

Gambari was allowed in, with permission for an extended stay, but the visit lasted only five days, as many of his requests for meetings were rejected.

Prior to Gambari’s visit, UN chief Ban sent a letter in February to the paramount Burmese leader, Than Shwe requesting a five-point cooperation deal to help his special envoy achieve his mission. The junta later decided to dump all UN requests and even burnt them in public, allowing only the government mouthpiece, the New Light of Myanmar, to publicise the substance of the meeting between the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) spokesman Kyaw Hsan and Gambari over the weekend. Kyaw Hsan told Gambari that the Burmese government would arrange for UN visitors at any time as proposed, but the establishment of a special office in Rangoon for Gambari was unnecessary since the UN already had many representatives in the country through whom Gambari could work.

The second point, which Gambari championed before his visit, was to have inclusive participation in Burmese politics. But this was also dismissed by the junta. Kyaw Hsan said the new Burmese constitution had already been drafted and would not be amended any further. The draft bars those who are married to foreigners from participating in politics. More precisely, it prevents Aung San Suu Kyi from having any hope of being elected as the next Burmese leader.

“It was Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy who decided not to participate in the constitution drafting. There cannot be any more ‘all-inclusiveness’ in this process,” Kyaw Hsan told Gambari.

On the third point, Ban asked to have a credible, timeframe and all-inclusive discussion between the junta and Aung San Suu Kyi, including support by the UN.

Kyaw Hsan simply replied that the National Convention – the constitution drafting body – is the most credible and all-inclusive political discussion forum.

Now, discussions between the Minister for Information and Aung San Suu Kyi are under way in accordance with UN wishes. Than Shwe even could meet the opposition leader if Suu Kyi agrees to drop her demands for the continuance and extension of international sanctions against the junta. But as long as Aung San Suu Kyi maintains this stance, the dialogue cannot be productive, Kyaw Hsan said.

On the demands for the release of political prisoners, the junta simply said that it has no political prisoners, but that those who are serving jail terms or are under other restrictions, including Aung San Suu Kyi, have violated the laws.

The final UN point, a request to have an inclusive National Economic Forum for addressing economic and social affairs, and a cooperative mechanism for humanitarian assistance, was simply rejected as being “useless”, Kyaw San said.

“If Your Excellency helps to lift economic sanctions, allow aid into the country, and approve loans, it might be more effective than the Economic Forum you propose. Giving assistance for poverty reduction while imposing sanctions will never produce the right solution,” he said.

Kyaw Hsan also pointed out to Gambari that democracy developed in accordance with different contexts in different countries. He compared his constitution-making process with neighbouring Thailand.

“Now, the Thai people have approved and started to practice a new constitution for Thailand. But none of the candidates of the People Power Party and the opposition Democrat Party had the right to participate in the [drafting] process. To make it clearer, in Iraq, Shi’ite militants who oppose the US, and Sunni militants who have links with al-Qaeda had no right to participate in the process of drafting a constitution. Similarly, in Afghanistan, the Taleban had no right to draft the constitution. We haven’t heard any objection to these events by those persons and organisations who are objecting to us. But with the drafting of the constitution in our country, many are criticising us and pointing out that certain persons are not among the representatives in the process. It is not reasonable,” he said.

Gambari has no argument, as the UN has nothing to bargain with. He simply said he would convey the message to his boss, whom he would meet in Senegal this week.

Supalak Ganjanakhundee

The Nation

Read United Nations Special Envoy Ibrahim Gambari ‘s report here.

Persistence and patience

don’t pay in Burma

The Nation: Regional neighbours need to exert more pressure on the junta to achieve political reconciliation

When dealing with the Burmese junta, concerned parties, especially the UN and its special envoy, Ibrahim Gambari, must be prepared for long and often futile negotiations and continual setbacks. Since 1988, those who have engaged Burma have had their faces slapped by the generals. Indeed, Gambari was snubbed again by the junta just a week ago. This has increasingly become the typical pattern of engagement with Burma. If anything, there is also a realisation that the junta is calling the shots and nothing can progress without its agreement. This is the saddest development since last September, when violence broke out on the streets of Rangoon and other cities. The whole world witnessed more atrocities committed by Burmese troops, who gunned down monks and other peaceful protestors. The international community led by the Western countries suddenly became more vociferous. The UN Security Council managed to talk a lot but there was no solution to the situation. Since then, Gambari has visited Burma three times but without any substantial progress being made. The junta leaders know the game plan very well. They know how to manipulate both Gambari and the good offices of the UN.

Recently, the junta surprised the world with its announcement that there would be a national referendum on the new constitution in May, followed by a general election in 2010. But the electoral law bars any possible participation by opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. With such a “roadmap”, the junta’s supporters have extra ammunition to further bolster the regime. Already, China and Asean have expressed support for this roadmap. Thailand is the most enthusiastic. Prime Minister Samak Sundaravej went out of his way last week to accommodate the regime, without knowing the full implications for Thailand.

Without Thai support, the political reconciliation process in Burma will continue to stall – and thus work in favour of the junta. During the Surayud government, relations between the two countries were frozen. There were no new activities in the political or economic fields. However, with the formation of a new Thai government, the friendship has returned to normal. Severed economic links have been restored and Thailand is again willing to play second fiddle to Burma. With such an attitude, Thailand’s role in the Burmese crisis is turning into a travesty. Samak praised the regime after his visit to Rangoon. His comments revealed Thailand’s naivete and its leader’s foul mouth. Foreign Minister Noppadon Patama was no better. He said the situation in Burma is an internal matter and that Thailand does not support sanctions.

Apparently, the UN is the only hope. But the treatment of Gambari during his last visit was unwarranted. While the UN is still the best hope to help end the impasse, it lacks teeth. One of the problems is that UNSC members are not acting together. Both Russia and China support the Burmese junta. Their positive contributions to the six-party peace talks have yet to be seen. The UNSC must now bridge the gap and come together with a unified view that the Burmese situation is a threat to regional peace and security. 

It is interesting to note that all Thai leaders, including former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra and the current premier, are willing to make trade-offs with the Burmese generals. Given the current stalemate, there should be new initiatives to bolster the UN position. Within Asean, countries like Indonesia and Vietnam could do more. At one time, Indonesia under Suharto was considered an ideal model by the Burmese regime. But democratisation since 1998 has made Indonesia less attractive to the generals. Vietnam’s engagement with the West, and its successful economic development in the past two decades, has attracted the junta’s attention. Together with the UN, these countries could make a new impression on the junta. During the height of the Cambodian conflict in the 1980s, Indonesia helped break the deadlock, which subsequently led to the Paris peace talks. Maybe with a right combination of actors exerting pressure, things could move ahead in Burma.  

The Nation

My Dreams are not mere illusions

My dream interviews are not mere illusions

  • My Dreams come true.
  • Actions speak louder than words.
  • Indirectly confirmed by DSAI’s speech/lecture that I was not wrong in my dreams in reading his mind.
  • A written word is more effective than thousands of spoken words.
  • The Chinese proverb says it best: “the faintest ink lasts longer than the best memory.”
  • Harold Adams Innis : As the oral tradition of speech gave way to the dominance of writing_
  • The written record, signed, sealed and swiftly transmitted was essential to military power and the extension of government. Small communities were written into large states and states were consolidated into empire.
  • In Burmese, we have a saying, “Nhote Ta’ Yar_Sarr Ta’ Lone”, meaning: A hundred of spoken words are equivalent to just one written word.
  • bannerdsaibh1.png

    Keynote eynote address by Anwar Ibrahim at the Institute of Social Sciences conference on Democracy in India, December 6, 2007 in New Delhi 

    The following speech was delivered at the Institute of Social Sciences Conference on Democracy in India.
    Justice J.S. Verma, Former Chief Justice of India and Former Chairman, National Human Rights Commission of India, opened the conference.
    Other speakers are: Mr. Roel von Mijenfeldt, Director, Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy (www.nimd.org), Carl Gershman, Director of the National Endowment for Democracy (www.ned.org), and Dr. Farooq Abdallah, Former Chief Minister of Jammu & Kashmir, and etc.
    Your Excellencies and Distinguished Guests. Dr. George Matthew and Dr. Ash Roy, Carl Gershman. Ladies and Gentleman.
      Please read DSAI’s lecture because I hereby just presented some gist s only as notes.

    Please permit me to begin by _

    • Quoting the great Rabindranath Tagore,
    • from his book of poems known as A Flight of Swans – Poems from Balaka:
    • I hear the countless voices of the human heart
    • Flying unseen,
    • From the dim past to the dim unblossomed future
    • Hear, within my own breast,
    • The fluttering of the homeless bird which,
    • In company with countless others,
    • Flies day and night,
    • Through light and darkness,
    • From shore to shore unknown
    • Tagore was of course referring to the flying swans, or Hansa-balaakaa in Bengali.
    • I understand that this word is to pious Hindus a symbol of the human soul winging its way to its heavenly resting-place.
    • To my mind, the celebration of the human spirit may also be likened to Tagore’s metaphor of the eternal flight of the swans.
    •  
      1. a nation that is completely diverse,
      2. a world unto itself with respect to religious, linguistic, and cultural heterogeneity
      3. and yet in its sixty years of independence has remained
      4. peaceful
      5. and has never wavered from its democratic course.
      • I believe democracy is also about pluralism, 
        • without which (pluralism)
        • dissenting views will not find expression
        • and a healthy vibrant opposition will not materialize.
      • It has been said that our current understanding of constitutional democracy may be traced to the ideas of John Locke, (he influenced the framers of the American constitution & the European governments).
      • the number of countries that are classified as free has increased significantly
      • so that some areas in which democratically elected governments were scarcely present
      • now see democracy as the primary form of government. This clearly reflects the aspirations of the people.
        I recall as a student activist my first encounter with Nehru’s compelling words to the Constituent Assembly in 1947. One must appreciate the Indian experience bears testament to that fact – In the last two decades_Freedom_

      • has a demonstrative effect
      • and the appetite for it is whetted
      • when one sees others_
      • o       enjoying liberty,

        o       freedom of conscience

        o       and the right to property

        o       and the pursuit of a decent livelihood.

        But there remain_

      • pockets of resistance
      • and certain entrenched interests
      • which are resolved against the continued advance of freedom and democracy.
      • submissiveness to the state is a traditional value.
      • They say that before the supremacy of the State and the well-being of its citizens,
      • there is no place for individual liberty.
      • the control of the media,
      • restrictions on free assembly
      • and restraints on the freedom of expression
      •  
        • are further justified as necessary for the achievement of certain economic priorities.
      • who has thoroughly debunked the false discourse of Asian values
      • and proven the intrinsic value of democracy
      • as well as the intimate and inseparable relationship between democracy and development.
      • starvation
      • and freedom.
      • overcome poverty
      • and tyranny
      • without compromising in the struggle against either.
      • the one that garners the most attention and admiration today is that act of voting
      • which represents the empowerment of a people
      • over those who will govern and execute laws upon them.
      • elections feature so prominently in the democracy discourse,
      • is whether the mere phenomenon of elections means_
        • that democracy is alive and well,
        • or are there still fundamental issues to be resolved?
      • free,
      • fair
      • and transparent.
      • which includes equal access to a free media,
      • open debates
      • and a conduct of elections that can stand up to international scrutiny.
      • When the results of elections are called into question
        • an independent judiciary
        • free from political influence must be able to arbitrate
        • and rule on the matter without bias.
      • Speaking of an independent judiciary,
        • many an Asian country wherein judges have fallen prey to
          • the machinations of dictators
          • and autocrats alike regardless
            • whether they purport to act as_
              • army generals
              • or civilians!
      • What is an election_
        • if political parties in the opposition do not have_
          • access to the freedom of speech,
          • assembly,
          • and movement
            • necessary to voice their criticisms of the government openly_
              • and to bring alternative policies
              • and candidates to the voters?
      • the opposition is_
        • barred from the airwaves,
        • rallies are not allowed,
        • and opposition newspapers operate underground.
      •  
        • then the existence of a vibrant opposition is essential
          • as the bulwark against the tyranny of absolute power.
        • as indeed it should be,
        • we will find that many countries today are dismal failures.
        • And this is not just confined to_
          • fledgling democracies
        • but we also see it manifest in constitutional democracies-
          • that have enjoyed independence for more than half a century.
    • In this regard, we may say that

      democracy is about_

      The same principles of freedom and justice have been expressed elsewhere and in different contexts with the same goal in mind.

       The great freedom fighters of our time_

      We must contend with leaders who are of the view that_

      The subversive tactics of the state such as_

      On this we owe a debt of gratitude to Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen

      Democracy is not about the choice between_

      It is about the freedom to_

      Of the many symbolic acts and institutions which democracy tends to create_

      Elections are an essential component of any democracy.

      Elections of course must be_

      But beyond that there must be a “level playing field” –

      Where I come from,

      I am sure mine is not a unique experience.

      If democracy is participatory government in its fullest sense_ 

     

    •  
        • the practice of democracy
        • and the work that is being done to support it around the world.
      • Similarly, if pluralism is the final test of democracy,

        We must therefore take a deeper and more profound look at_

        Decisions_

      • which undermine freedom and democracy
      • that are made in places where the rule of law is considered sacrosanct
      • have global implications_
        • and we must recognise that:
          • they quickly become the pretext
            • which tyrants
            • and dictators
          • use to justify their intransigence.
      • Here we can lay some of the blame for this alarming trend on the mantle of the War on Terror,

        which is the rubric under which_

      • various illegal actions are
        • justified
        • and sanctioned,
      • be they_
        • encroachment on the sovereignty of other nations
        • or a curtailment of the civil liberties of one’s own citizens.
      • This vaguely conceived war_

      • with all its bluster and bravado,
      • has paved the way in many U.S.-allied countries for_
        • brutal
        • and unchecked repression,
      • which in some places threatens to nullify the reform efforts of an entire generation.
        • as inherently anti-democratic
        • and tending towards extremism
        • and violence.
      • In ascribing the mantra of_

      • radical Islam indiscriminately:
        • organisations,
        • and the millions of people they represent,
      •   to any group that professes
        • to be founded on Islamic precepts the advocates of the War on Terror have pigeonholed
      • This reflects a profound misunderstanding of

      • the nature of these groups
      • and the underlying causes of
        • radicalism
        • and terrorism.
      • It is also emblematic of the discourse that tends to place democracy and Islam as inherently incompatible.

        I for one disagree. There is certainly nothing in the religion itself which is opposed to freedom – the higher objectives of the sacred law are in fact committed to the preservation of those basic inalienable rights of freedom of conscience and the pursuit of wealth.

        The Muslim world faces a deficit of democracy because of_

      • the proliferation of autocrats who rule in the name of religion
      • but are often openly hostile and opposed to
      • those who express its teachings,
      • and are hell-bent on preserving their rule
        • in contravention of conventions of governance
        • and the Rule of Law.
      • By expanding our conception of the Muslim world beyond the confines of the Arab-Middle East,

        we find the forces of democracy advancing with much greater fortitude and conviction.

        The democratic success of Turkey and Indonesia are shining examples that the world would benefit by paying closer attention to. Indonesia,

      • while still grappling with the vexing problems of corruption and poverty,
      • represents a success story of immense significance
      • if one considers that the largest Muslim country in the world emerged from_
        • three decades of authoritarian rule,
        • practically overnight,
        • and without a single foreign troop stepping foot on her soil,
        • nor the shedding of a single drop of blood.
        • The AKP of Turkey represents the logical progression of democracy in Turkey –
        • a government that is at ease with the nation’s cultural and religious heritage as it is with the secular underpinnings of the government.
        • India,
        • Indonesia,
        • Turkey,
        • Japan,
        • and South Korea
        • which emphasises issues of governance
        • and accountability,
        • greater economic potential
        • as well as the unleashing of the creative energies of the human spirit. 
      • Asia’s rise to prominence in the latter part of the 20th century was monopolised by the fascination with the economic prowess of some of its stronger nations. That lens continues to influence engagement with the region

        India and China being the leaders

        but other countries proving their mettle in an increasingly competitive and globalised marketplace.

        While economic strength will continue to be a key indicator of the region’s overall development, I am quite confident that with leadership of burgeoning democracies like_

      • 3 Responses to “Keynote address by Anwar Ibrahim at the Institute of Social Sciences conference on Democracy in India, December 6, 2007 in New Delhi ”

      • I agree with your comments regarding Turkey, Dato Seri. There should be a clear separation of religion and government.
        Your continuing to “fight the good fight” is inspiring.

        • Religion is one’s personal communication with one’s God. Politics cannot be intertwined with one’s religious beliefs. Where politics is concerned it should practice the universal law of justice, equality and freedom within a discipline outlined by a just and fair govt. Though a group may fall within a religious philosophy, in practice each individual will definitely differ. So how can we have a govt. that uses a religious philosophy to outline public behaviour? So how come there are countries that favour certain religious and ethnic groups? There is much to think about for future politicians if they want to be respected and remain in office

      •    

    •   1 Implosion Dec 8th, 2007 at 9:12 pm