ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE 

WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

 

ASEAN leaders are complaining about the convenient way to solve the Rohingya problem.

But for the Rohingyas or Burmese Muslims or Christian Chins/Karens/Kachins and Buddhist Mons/Shans/Burmese etc AND the NLDS  and political opponents and armed rebel groups_

Whether the SPDC would accept them back is not their main concern. What is the consequences after repatriation is their only problem.

Jailed? Tortured? Is the main concern for all but ‘Village arrest’ (for Rohingyas only) is the problem.

No democracy, no Human Rights, no political life, no respect for the Rights of religious minorities and Ethnic minorities is their main concern.

But the lack of development, economic problems back home are the most important fact for all of them.

There is no clear cut line to DEFINE OR CATEGORIZE THEM INTO POLITICAL OR ECONOMIC MIGRANTS. 

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Asean day dreaming II

Asean day dreaming II

There was much enthusiasm over the establishment of the Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines – East Asean Growth Area (Bimp-Eaga) – back in the early 1990s, which was touted as the most promising growth triangle in Southeast Asia. However, it has since come to nothing.

The 1997 Asian financial crisis practically took the wind out of its sails, and exposed mercilessly that the so-called East Asian economic miracle was made of clay.

In fact, I had not heard of Bimp-Eaga for years, until early this week when Augustin Teras Narang, the Central Kalimantan governor, mentioned it in passing during his visit to Sabah and Sarawak.

The governor has a vision for a regional economic community fashioned on the successful European Union, and hopes the entire Borneo island would serve as a springboard to achieving just that.

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STOP HATRED, STOP TRYING TO DIVIDE; FOR A LONG LASTING PEACE, PROGRESS, AND PROSPERITY

 

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Don’t cry for me grandpa, Minister Mentor

Don’t cry for me grandpa, Minister Mentor

  

There is a Burmese saying_

Kyaw poo dar_khan naing thee

Naar poo dar_ma khan naing”.

  • Most of the peaple could bear the heat on the back of the body (prefer to work hard even under the sun)
  • but could not stand the (heat/ pressure) in the ears (read: brain / stress / undue pressure from the boss).

Some of us could prefer to work hard but could not stand the mental torture, pressure, or stress.

Yes! Even our Prophet (PBUH) had taught us_

If you do not want to donate to a beggar, use polite words to apologize.

But never insult the beggar even after you donated a large some of money.

Getting / money or not is far less important than getting an insult.

Money goes into the pocket only but the insult goes deep into our hearts.

So feeding the human’s mental ego is sometimes more important than just feeding the mouths.

Successive Burmese Governments used to discriminate us as foreigners, migrants, mixed blooded persons, Kalas (Migrant Indians/Indians), Kala Dein (Indian descendent)  and “Mi Ma Sit_Pha Ma Sit”. (The words meaning Bastards used by the the Burmese Chinese General Ne Win on Burmese Muslims. I think he never look at his own BASTARD FACE in the mirror!)

Most of us emigrated (migrated out) and left Myanmar not because of economic reason. As the professionals we could earn enough to stay in upper-middle strata in Myanmar and could earn some respect not only from the non-Muslims but from the Monks and even from the Military authorities. We just hate the unfair general discrimination on our race and religion. (As all the Military leaders are corrupt, we could even do anything in Myanmar after paying bribes. If the payment is good enough we could even get their daughter’s hands.)

Once the governments could fulfill (actually all the government leaders wrongly thought like that! They think they had done favours on their on citizens but actually the people are the masters of the governments. Although the governments’ policy and guidance  are important, it is the people who really works hard to achieve every thing for the country. And the give the salaries, of cause from their tax money, to those political leaders.) the physical and psycological needs of its citizens_

Food, shelter, clothing, employment is important but should understand that they also should take care of their social, mental and psycological needs.

SINGAPORE GOVERNMENT FAILS BECAUSE OF THAT FAILURE>

Just read the following article.

Don’t cry for me grandpa Lee,

Goodbye and thank you

Excerpts from article by SEAH CHIANG NEE.  Singapore’s emigration rate, one of the highest in the world on a per capita basis, is a blow to the government.

YEARS of strong economic growth have failed to stem Singapore’s skilled youths from leaving for a better life abroad, with the number topping 1,000 a year. 

This works out to 4%-5%, or three in 10, of the highly educated population, a severe brain drain for a small, young nation, according to Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew. 

Such high-end emigration is usually associated with less better-off countries where living conditions are poor. Here the opposite is the case. 

The future doesn’t look better, either, despite Lee holding out promises of “a golden period” in the next five to 10 years. 

The emigration rate, one of the highest in the world on a per capita basis, is a blow to the government, particularly to Lee, who takes pride in building up this once poor squatter colony into a glittering global city. 

They are people who abandoned their citizenship for a foreign one, mostly in Australia, the United States and Canada. 

The emigrants, mostly professionals, don’t leave Singapore out of poverty but to seek a better, less pressurised life.  

Lee recently said the brain drain is touching close to this family. 

Lee’s grandson, the elder son of Prime Minister Hsien Loong, who is studying in the United States, has indicated that he may not return.  

Over the years, the children of several Cabinet ministers have also made Britain or the US their home.  

Lee, aged 84, has often spoken on the issue with emotions, once tearing when referring to the losses.  

However, he has offered no reasons for the exodus beyond economic opportunities, although the government more or less knows what they are.  

Singaporeans who have or are planning to emigrate are given a host of 10 questions and asked to tick the three most important ones. They include the following: –  

> High costs of living 

> Singapore is too regulated and stifling 

> Better career and prospects overseas 

> Prefer a more relaxed lifestyle 

> Uncertain future of Singapore. 

Some liberal Singaporeans believe Lee himself, with his authoritarian leadership and unpopular policies, is largely to blame.  

Singapore’s best-known writer Catherine Lim calls it a climate of fear that stops citizens from speaking out against the government.

Globalisation, which offers opportunities in many countries like never before, is a big reason for the outflow.  

Many countries, including populous China, are making a special effort to attract foreign talent. 

Others who leave were worried about the future of their children living in a small island, and look for security and comfort of a larger country. 

The exodus is more than made up – at least in numbers – by a larger intake of professionals from China and India. 

“The trouble is many of the Chinese then use us as a stepping stone to go to America, where the grass is greener, Lee said. 

Some feel the large presence of foreigners, and the perks they enjoy over locals in military exemption as well as in scholarships, are themselves strong push factors.  

They see the foreigners as a threat to jobs and space, undermining salaries and loosening the nation’s cohesion. 

“I just feel very sad to see the Singapore of today with so many talented, passionate Singaporeans moving out and being replaced by many foreigners,” said one blogger. “I feel sorry for the future.” (Me too, for Myanmar.)

Lee recently made a passionate appeal to youths to think hard about their country. He said they had received education and opportunities provided by Singaporeans who had worked hard for it. 

“Can you in good conscience say, ‘Goodbye! Thank you very much?’ Can you leave with a clear conscience? I cannot,” he said.  

But many Burmese just need to say this even although they could not get the same kind of welcome from their host countries. Some need to work illegally, some as refugees and many professionals have to do the manual works. So you Singaporeans are luckier than us. Just leave the old grandpa enjoy his own great authority on new comers, or new immigrants.

 

 

The Euro-Muslims Zone

The Euro-Muslims Zone

Muslim Role Models (Share)

Muslim Role Models (Share)

 

By  Euro-Muslims Editorial Desk

 
Image

Muslims in Europe have been remarking positively.

Starting as predominantly post-World War II immigrants who arrived as laborers, Muslims in Europe have been remarking positively on their European societies.

European Muslims continue to redefine themselves in their communities, discussing choices and decisions to help in forming a healthy environment for more understanding of Islam and integration of Muslims into their European countries. In Europe, a lot of Muslims of both European and non-European origins have proved gradually that they can overcome many cultural and socioeconomic obstacles to achieve remarkable success.
  


Some say that European Muslims are moving forward from a community that barely fulfills its essential requirements
, to a steady one that is going beyond many expectations.


European Muslims Zone is presenting the profiles of some European Muslim role models who have clearly drawn attention to their valuable success and uniquely state, observing their religious identity as Muslims and their European identity as active citizens.


Take a look at the profiles and if you have any suggestion for more European Muslim role models, kindly add their profiles below or e-mail them toEuro-Muslims Email and we will post them online.

Salma Yaqoob

Tariq Ramadan

Muhammad Ali

Yusuf Islam

 


Salma Yaqoob
Salma Yaqoob is a prominent anti-war activist and the UK’s party Respect’s cofounding member and vice-chair. With a total of 10,498 votes, she came second with 27 percent of the vote in Birmingham’s Sparkbrook and Small Heath constituency in the May 2005 general election. In May 2006, she was elected councilor for the Sparkbrook ward in Birmingham.

Born in Bradford but raised in Birmingham, Salma Yaqoob has proven to be a remarkable icon not only for Muslim women, but also for Muslims in general and activists throughout the UK. Being a mother of three boys never stood in the way of Ms. Yaqoob campaigning tirelessly for what she believed in and for positive change in her local community and way beyond.

Salma Yaqoob has addressed numerous demonstrations and meetings all protesting against the Iraq War and the Israeli occupation of Palestine. She has continued to fight for civil liberties in the UK and against all policies that target those freedoms and liberties, including the anti-terrorist law recently proposed. She is a strong advocate for the right of Muslim women to wear the hijab. Her campaigning for the rights of the elderly and those most in need, has already won her widespread support.

She has continued to fight for civil liberties in the UK and against all policies that target those freedoms and liberties, including the anti-terrorist law recently proposed. She is a strong advocate for the right of Muslim women to wear the hijab. Her campaigning for the rights of the elderly and those most in need has already won her widespread support.

Publications

Salma Yaqoob is the author of several books. Among her books are:

  • Global and Local Echoes of the Anti-war Movement: A British Muslim Perspective.” International Socialism Journal. Autumn 2003.
  • The “War on Terror” and Racism, Asylum and Immigration. Pluto Press, 2005.
  • British Muslim Radicalism Post 9/11 in Islamic Political Radicalism: A European Comparative. Edinburgh University Press, 2006.

Tariq Ramadan  

 

Tariq Ramadan was born in Switzerland in 1962. He is the grandchild of Imam Hassan Al-Banna, the founder of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.

Ramadan holds a master’s degree in philosophy and French literature and a doctorate in philosophy in Arabic and Islamic studies from the University of Geneva, Switzerland. In Cairo, Egypt, he received one-on-one intensive training in classic Islamic scholarship from Al-Azhar University scholars.

He is a professor of Islamic studies. He is currently a senior research fellow at Saint Antony’s College (Oxford, UK), Doshisha University (Kyoto, Japan), and at the Lokahi Foundation (London, UK.)

 

He is a visiting professor (in charge of the chair: Identity and Citizenship) at Erasmus University, the Netherlands.

Through his writings and lectures, he has contributed substantially to the debate on the issues of Muslims in the West and Islamic revival in the Muslim world. He is active both at the academic and grassroots levels lecturing extensively throughout the world on social justice and dialogue between civilizations.

 

Ramadan is currently president of the European Muslim Network (EMN) think tank in Brussels, Belgium.

 

To visit Ramadan’s website, click here.

 

Publications

 

Dr. Tariq Ramadan is the author of several books. Among his books are:

  • Muslims in Secular Societies, Responsibilities and Rights of Muslim People in Western Societies, Tawhid, Lyon, 1994 (3rd ed. 2000)
  • Islam, the Encounter of Civilizations, What Project for Which Modernity?, Les Deux Rives, Lyon, 1995 (4th ed. 2001), translated into English: Islam, The West and The Challenges of Modernity, Islamic Foundation, Leicester, UK, 1999.
  • To be a European Muslim, by C. Dabbak, Tawhid, Lyon, September 1999.
  • Muslims in France, Islamic Foundation, Leicester, UK, April 1999.
  • Muslims of the West, to Build and to Contribute, Tawhid pocket books, Lyon, 2002.
  • The Western World, Space of Testimony, Dar ash-shahada, Tawhid pocket books, Lyon 2002.
  • Muslims in the West and the Future of Islam, Actes Sud, Paris, January 2003.

 

Muhammad Ali  

 

Originally from Tunisia, Muhammad Ali was born into a conservative Muslim family born and bred on Islamic beliefs together with the freedom of following his own dream and visions.

 

Muhammad Ali, through creating ingenious and practical television that complements the definition of good programming and transmission as well as delivering against viewers needs has marked a milestone for a Muslim voice in the media. He heads Islam Channel (a television channel presenting the Islamic perspective)

 

His academic background includes studying in both the East and West. Initially having studied engineering, his curious mind and inquisitive nature led him on to study philosophy and theology in Iran, politics and geography in the UK, followed by a master’s in both linguistics and diplomacy.

 

Aside from this, he has memorized a good portion of the holy Qu’ran and has attended circles of prominent Islamic scholars, going on to further studies in comparative Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh) in addition to comparative fundamentals of belief (`aqeedah) at traditional schools of knowledge in Tehran.

 

Currently he is studying for a doctorate in Islamic political thought. Muhammad Ali has vast experiences in many cultures and customs around the world, his travels have taken him to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Bosnia where he worked for da`wah (Arabic for: raising awareness for Islam) and charity projects.

 

As CEO of Islam Channel, Muhammad Ali has been able to put his experience and visions on screen by creating a platform for Muslims generally. Through this channel he has numerous achievements to date including bringing together many world-renown scholars and Islamic programs, as well as screening political debates, news, and current affairs into the homes of both Muslims and non-Muslims. Having conquered the UK, Muhammad Ali has taken Islam Channel to viewers across Europe, Africa, and Asia.

 

Muhammad Ali, through Islam Channel, has proven himself to be a highly ambitious and successful entrepreneur. This relatively new enterprise offers an invaluable

source of da`wah, making Islam Channel the leading light for millions of Muslims, guiding the Ummah (Arabic for: Islamic nation) toward the path of Allah.

 

What began as representation for Muslims within the UK has expanded out to both Muslims and non-Muslims around the globe. With the support of his wife and five young children, he has been able to achieve this through his hard work and perseverance, aiming at representing Muslims and Islam in its genuine sense of freedom, justice, and coexistence.

 

 

 

Yusuf Islam  

 

The son of a Greek Cypriot father and Swedish mother, Yusuf Islam (then Steven Demetre Georgiou) was born in 1947,  and (he) grew up above the family shop in London’s Theatre district, situated at the northernmost junction of Shaftesbury Avenue and New Oxford Street, near the heart of London’s West End.

 

Cat Stevens (is the former stage name of musician Yusuf Islam, born Steven Demetre Georgiou)  went on to become one of the biggest solo artists of the 1960s and 1970s, penning such songs as “Matthew and Son,” “Moonshadow,” “Wild World,” and “Father and Son” and selling over 50 million LPs ( Long-Player record).

 

Following a bout of TB early in his career, he undertook an ongoing search for peace and ultimate spiritual truth. After almost drowning in the Pacific Ocean at Malibu, he received a translation of the Qur’an as a gift from his elder brother, David. His spiritual quest for answers was fulfilled and he embraced Islam in December 1977. Six months later, he changed his name to Yusuf Islam, walked away from the music business to start a new life and raise a family. He auctioned his musical instruments and gold records and divided the proceeds between Help The Aged and Help a London Child, two UK charities. 

 

His Sarajevo concert in 1997, to celebrate Bosnian culture, was his first public appearance for 20 years. His most recent mainstream contribution was to War Child UK’s Hope album to raise money for children victimized by war in Iraq for

which he re-worked his 1971 classic, “Peace Train.”

 

His pioneering work in the field of education resulted in securing a landmark decision by the British government to certify and support Islamic education throughout the UK. The three schools he founded in London — Islamia Primary, Islamia Girls Secondary, and the Brondesbury College for Boys — constantly top the government’s examination league tables.

 

His founding and continued chairmanship of the International Board of Educational Research and Resources has resulted in the production of key textbooks and resources for Muslim schools around the world, including the development and encouragement of teachings practices rooted in the Qur’an and Sunnah.

 

Have Your Say (Note by Dr SOA: Please forgive me for changing the Europe Muslim role model to Muslim role model to widen the scope)

 

What do you think of these role models?

According to what do you call someone a Muslim role model?

Can you suggest any other Muslim role models?

Open letter to H.E. Professor Sergio Pinheiro

Open letter to H.E. Professor Sergio Pinheiro

To

Professor Sergio Pinheiro
(Brazilian law professor and
human rights investigator)
Special rapporteur of the
U.N. Secretary General on
human rights in Myanmar

 

Dear Mr Sergio Pinheiro,                                       

                                          Thank you for the great job you are going to do for the Burmese people. Instead of pressing SPDC generals to investigate the fatal crackdown on protesters in September, please may you kindly start an investigation yourself as the Myanmar SPDC top generals had all the knowledge of those and they had ordered the killing. 

We all Burmese people and some of the world observers already know that allowing you, Sergio Pinheiro, Special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar of the U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon and Mr Ibrahim Gambari are just the stage-shows to deflect the public and international outrage after SPDC Military had brutally suppressed, assaulted, arrested, tortured about six thousand and murdered few hundred of peaceful demonstrators and revered monks.  

SPDC and Than Shwe could be able to defuse the anger of the world and save the faces of their friends; China, Russia, India and ASEAN esp. Singapore and Malaysia, who would applause and go on supporting and exploiting Myanmar for another few decades. Procrastination and buying time is the ultimate goal of the SPDC Junta. At the same time, the SPDC media is repeatedly declaring that Myanmar Military Government   is steadfastly going to continue the cracking down on democratic forces until the opposition is totally eliminated or annihilated or totally uprooted. 

When Mr Ibrahim Gambari was asked by the reporters, why instead of looking around the killing field in Yangon, why did he went to Shan State and other irrelevant places, he replied that he had no  power nor mandate to go anywhere he like to investigate but just a guest of the SPDC and had to follow their arrangement.  

According to the unconfirmed reports, up to 8,000 people may have been rounded up around Yangon. This could not be independently confirmed but dissident groups have said that up to 6,000 people have been arrested since troops put down the uprising on Sept. 26 and 27 when they opened fire on crowds. The government says 10 people were killed but others say up to 200 people died in the crackdown on demonstrators who were largely led by Buddhist monks. Part of the proof is already in the photographs and videos came out from Burma and splashed in all the media worldwide.

But the SPDC Myanmar Military Junta had tried to destroy the evidences, repaired the monasteries, arrested, intimidated or killed the witnesses, confisticated all the films, audio and video evidences. So, to safe time and to make your job easy, instead of investigating all the cases of assaults, brutality and killings, please may you kindly just investigate one case which could represent all the atrocities of the SPDC on the unarmed peaceful civilians without provocation or threat of violence. 

Just investigate the murder of Japanese reporter for Tokyo-based APF News, Kenji Nagai’s case thoroughly from all the angles as if you are the investigation officer for a serious crime. If you could have the help of CIA, FBI or CSI team (Crime Scene Investigators) you could easily bring those Criminal SPDC Junta to the International Criminal Court for cold blooded killing of this Japanese photo-video Journalist.  

Footage capturing the last, terrible seconds of Kenji Nagai’s life has been aired on Japanese television and you could easily get to the root of the truth behind the 50-year old photo-journalist’s murder by Burmese troops.  

You should ask the detailed analysis of that video-clip and photos from the Japanese authorities. You could get the confirmation that the person in the pictures and video was the authentic pictures of Mr. Kenji Nagai.  

You should record the Japanese experts who had examined the footage and contradicted the official Burmese explanation of Nagai’s death – that he was killed by a “stray bullet”. 

You should record the Japanese investigators, who were seen in the news photographs at the crime scene. 

You should investigate how they get those pictures and video. And the person who shoot them. (You should plan and give the complete witness protection to the whole family of the Burmese photographer by taking the whole family back to USA immediately.) 

You must record the doctor at the Japanese embassy in Burma who confirmed that a bullet entered Nagai’s body from the lower right side of his chest, pierced his heart and exited from his back.  

You should insist to give a chance to record the interview with the “soldier” who shot Mr Nagai and if possible the squad or platoon involved.  

If you were not allowed to see the killer soldier and his troop, please kindly made sure, you get the black and white reply on paper. Who refused your request? 

You should try your best to get the most important fact, who had given the shoot to kill order? 

You need to make sure whether it is true that that even five generals including Yangon Division General were sacked because they refused to shoot the unarmed civilians and monks. If that was true, it is clear that the person who had given the order was higher than generals and Yangon Division Commander General and the five generals.

Only after the incriminating video-proof surfaced, the SPDC is trying to give excuses like a common criminal, they officially change the shooting to an accident.

What did SPDC mean by saying it was an accident? The SPDC soldiers were trigger happy and were ordered to freely shoot Myanmar citizens but they thought that the Japanese photo-journalist was a local Burmese Chinese and accidently or wrongly shoot and killed? Even if the victim in the shooting video was not a foreigner but local Myanmar citizen, it is still a crime to kill an unarmed civilian without provocation. SPDC Generals and especially Senior General Than Shwe is responsible to answer and clarify at the ICC. You should try to prove that there is Criminal Intent by SPDC.

The doctrine of transferred intent is another nuance of criminal intent. Transferred intent occurs where one intends the harm that is actually caused, but the injury occurs to a different victim or object. For example, SPDC soldier shoot the Japanese Photo-journalist “accidentally” because he thought that it was a local Burmese-Chinese.  The concept of transferred intent applies to homicide, battery, and arson. Felony murder statutes evince a special brand of transferred intent. Under a felony murder statute, any death caused in the commission of, or in an attempt to commit, a felony is murder. It is not necessary to prove that the defendant intended to kill the victim.

And the _

  1. arresting of the local journalists,

  2. cutting off the phone lines,

  3. vcutting off the internet internet

  4. Searching and

  5. confiscation of the cameras and hand phones capable of taking pictures

  6. are also clear case of trying to cover-up their crimes.

Above acts should be considered as the part of the cover-up scheme. This is the typical scenario of committing the Eighth Stage of Genocide, cover-up and denial.The whole SPDC from the Senior General Than Shwe to the soldiers who had done the shootings are all equally guilty of this killing

The “soldier” who shot Kenji Nagai was curiously wearing the slippers. I think this is the first time our world had witness a regular government soldier without boots. (Even there were reports that SPDC soldiers entered the monastries and pagodas without taking off their shoes.) May be there is some truth in the repeated rumors that SPDC officers trained the convicted criminals to shoot the rifles (or semi-automatic machine guns) and given the stimulants like Amphetamines or Ecstasy pills to commit the atrocities like killing the monks and civilians. There are also repetitive reports that the SPDC soldiers are given the same stimulants like Amphetamines or Ecstasy pills to commit raping of ethnic minorities.

If that is true, the one who ordered or give the command to shoot and kill would be more guilty then the actual perpetrators. This is a very important point for you as a prosecutor at ICC.  

Command responsibility, sometimes referred to as the Yamashita standard or the Medina standard, is the doctrine of hierarchical accountability in cases of war and serious crimes. The doctrine of “command responsibility” was established by the Hague Conventions IV (1907) and X (1907).  This The Hague Conventions IV (1907) was the first attempt at codifying the principle of command responsibility on a multinational level.

The “Yamashita standard” is based upon the precedent set by the United States Supreme Court in the case of Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita. He was prosecuted, in a still controversial trial, for atrocities committed by troops under his command in the Philippines. Yamashita was charged with “unlawfully disregarding and failing to discharge his duty as a commander to control the acts of members of his command by permitting them to commit war crimes.”

It was not until after WWI that the Allied Powers’ Commission on the Responsibility of the Authors of the War and on the Enforcement of Penalties recommended the establishment of an international tribunal, which would try individuals for_

  1. “order[ing], or,

  2. with knowledge thereof and

  3. with power to intervene,

  4. abstain[ing] from preventing or

  5. taking measures to prevent,

  6. putting an end to or repressing,

  7. violations of the laws or customs of war.”

Introducing responsibility for an omission; Command responsibility is an omission mode of individual criminal liability:

The superior is responsible for_

  1. crimes committed by his subordinates and

  2. for failing to prevent or

  3. punish (as opposed to crimes he ordered).

The Yamashita courts clearly accepted that a commander’s actual knowledge of unlawful actions is sufficient to impose individual criminal responsibility.

Additional Protocol I

The first international treaty to comprehensively codify the doctrine of command responsibility was the Additional Protocol I (“AP I”) of 1977 to the Geneva Conventions of 1949.

Article 86(2) states that:

The fact that a breach of the Conventions or of this Protocol was committed by a subordinate does not absolve his superiors from …responsibility …

  1. if they knew, or

  2. had information which should have enabled them to conclude in the circumstances at the time,

  3. that he was committing or

  4. about to commit such a breach and

  5. if they did not take all feasible measures within their power to prevent or repress the breach.

Article 87 obliges a commander to

“prevent and, where necessary, to suppress and report to competent authorities” any violation of the Conventions and of AP I.

In Article 86(2) for the first time a provision would “explicitly address the knowledge factor of command responsibility.”

The term “command” can be defined as_

A.  De jure (legal) command, which can be both military and civilian. The determining factor here is not rank but subordination.

Four structures are identified:

  1. Policy command: heads of state, high-ranking government officials, monarchs

  2. Strategic command: War Cabinet, Joint Chiefs of Staff

  3. Operational command: military leadership; in Yamashita it was established that operational command responsibility cannot be ceded for the purpose of the doctrine of command responsibility – operational commanders must exercise the full potential of their authority to prevent war crimes, failure to supervise subordinates or non-assertive orders don’t exonerate the commander.

  4. Tactical command: direct command over troops on the ground

B. De facto (factual) command, which specifies effective control, as opposed to formal rank.

This needs a superior-subordinate relationship. They are:

  1. Capacity to issue orders

  2. Power of influence: influence is recognized as a source of authority in the Ministries case before the
    US military Tribunal after World War II.

  3. Evidence stemming from distribution of tasks: the ICTY has established the Nikolic test – superior status is deduced from analysis of distribution of tasks within the unit, it applies both to operational and POW camp commanders.

Additional Protocol I and the Statutes of the ICTY, the ICTR, and the ICC makes prevention or prosecution of crimes mandatoryThe Nuremberg Charter determined the basis to prosecute people for:

  1. Crimes against humanity: murder, extermination, enslavement, deportation, and other inhuman acts committed against any civilian population, before or during the war, or persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds in execution of or in connection with any crime within the jurisdiction of the Tribunal, whether or not in violation of the domestic law of the country where perpetrated.

The jurisdiction ratione personae is considered to apply to “leaders, organisers, instigators and accomplices” involved in planning and committing those crimes.

You should also try to prove the Malice of the SPDC. It is a state of mind that compels a person to deliberately cause unjustifiable injury to another person. At common law, murder was the unlawful killing of one human being by another with malice aforethought, or a predetermination to kill without legal justification or excuse.

The whole world knows that you would be able to show the proof of the Motive of SPDC.  As Motive is the cause or reason that induces a person to form the intent to commit a crime. It is not the same as intent. Rather, it explains why the person acted to violate the law. The knowledge that SPDC will receive the permanent dominance of Myanmar Military upon the death of the demonstrators is clearly the motive for those murders or massacres. But anyway the proof of motive is not required for the conviction of a crime. The existence of motive is immaterial to the matter of guilt when that guilt is clearly established. However, when guilt is not clearly established, the presence of motive might help to establish it. If a prosecution is based entirely on circumstantial evidence, the presence of motive may be persuasive in establishing guilt; likewise, the absence of motive might support a finding of innocence.

Instead of proper apology, or an acknowledgment expressing regret or asking pardon for a fault or offense from the SPDC Generals we are getting the excuses, to explain (a fault or an offense) in the hope of being forgiven or understood. SPDC falsely hope to be freed from the crimes, as from an obligation or duty. But sadly those were even not the explanations offered to justify or obtain forgiveness, nor reason or grounds for excusing: Senior General Than Shwe and other top generals must know that Ignorance is no excuse for breaking any law, local or ICC.

An excuse is essentially a defense for an individual’s conduct that is intended to mitigate the individual’s blameworthiness for a particular act or to explain why the individual acted in a specific manner.

To be excused from liability means that although the defendant may have been a participant in the sequence of events leading to the prohibited outcome, no liability will attach to the particular defendant because he or she belongs to a class of person exempted from liability. In normal circumstances, this will be a policy of expediency. Hence, members of the armed forces, the police or other civil organizations may be granted a degree of immunity for causing prohibited outcomes while acting in the course of their official duties, e.g. for an assault or trespass to the person caused during a lawful arrest. But in the Cases of the Crimes against Humanity, Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing or the Massacre of peaceful demonstrators and the point-blank shoot to killing of the Japanese Photojournalist cases at the ICC the above excuses are not valid at all. 

As a Law Professor, I hope you should told SPDC on their face to understand that they could not claim for the Diplomatic Immunity as they are not diplomats. It is for the exemption from taxation and ordinary processes of law afforded to diplomatic personnel in a foreign country only.

You should warn SPDC Generals that they should also understand that they could not claim for the executive privilege, exemption of the executive branch of government, or its officers, from having to give evidence, specifically, the exemption of the head of the government from disclosing information to inquiries or the judiciary. Claims of executive privilege are usually invoked to protect confidential military or diplomatic operations or to protect the private discussions and debates of the president with close aides. Efforts by various the head of the governments to gain absolute and unqualified privilege have been rejected by the International Criminal Courts.

So, Mr Sergio Pinheiro, as you had made the remark while delivering his annual report on the human rights situation in the country, adding events that occurred since issuing your last written report in August. From Sept. 26-28 when authorities used what you, Pinheiro called “excessive force,” including firing on and beating protesters, to rein in the large crowds. But your good self, Mr Pinheiro, could not present exact figures for how many had been killed and arrested, you cited other reports that between 30-40 monks and 50-70 civilians had allegedly been killed and 200 beaten. “It is difficult at this stage to provide you with accurate numbers of persons killed and arrested as well as those who are still detained,” you had said, adding that you hope to travel to the country to make a more accurate assessment based on witness testimonies and meetings with authorities.In accordance with a resolution passed by the Human Rights Council earlier in the month, you will urge authorities to carry out a set of actions, including conducting “independent and thorough investigations into the killings and enforced disappearances” as well as taking “action against those responsible.”

You said you will also press officials

  1. to reveal the whereabouts of missing persons,

  2. take steps to unconditionally release all detainees,

  3. grant amnesty to those who have been sentenced,

  4. allow them access to humanitarian personnel, and ensure for their physical and psychological safety. 

You and others in the international community have repeatedly expressed concerns about the fate of thousands of protesters who have reportedly been detained.

Thank you for calling on officials to “immediately and unconditionally release the detainees and political prisoners” including General Secretary of the National League of Democracy Aung Sang Suu Kyi, who you had noted had been held for exactly 12 years under house arrest.

“The stability of Myanmar is not well served by the arrest and detention of political leaders or by the severe and sustained restriction of fundamental freedoms,” you had further stated. “There will be no progress in Myanmar’s political transition unless ordinary people have space to express their views and discontent peacefully and in public.”

“My task is to offer an honest, complex, objective picture of the crisis … the excessive use of force, what’s happening in terms of detainees, the number of deaths,”you had said.

You  said that you would then present a report with your recommendations to the Geneva-based Human Rights Council on December 11.

According to you, ”I have reports that the chase of bystanders or people involved in the manifestations continues. I think that the situation of fear prevails. I don’t think that the repression has finished,” you said.

You said that reports of deaths, torture and disappearances of those taken into custody continue to come in. “What annoys me is that the repression has not stopped a single moment — this is what annoys me — despite all the universal appeals,” you rightly  told reporters at the United Nations, during a press conference at UN Headquarters, you said: “I don’t think that the repression… has finished,” adding that a “situation of fear prevails” in the country.

“I will ask free access, the secretary general will ask free access,” Pinheiro said, adding that visiting prison cells to speak to detainees was “a requirement.”

We hope you would not forget the above noble quotes and remarks you had given infront of the international media.

We hope and pray that you would not be constrained by the military junta,by hook or by  crook, but be able to go where you want in Myanmar as you had vowed.

 

Thanking You

Yours Humbly

 

Dr San Oo Aung 

UN, US, EU and ASEAN must consider for the Restitution to Myanmar/Burmese Citizens

UN, US, EU and ASEAN

must consider

for the Restitution 

to Myanmar/Burmese Citizens

Dr San Oo Aung

During the dialogue for the democratization of our country, before forming a transitional interim government and drawing the new constitution, we definitely need a reconciliatory talks.

Now, if the SPDC Junta refuses the demands of UN, US, EU and Burmese opposition, they should be threatened with the ICC. But if they give in and start a reconciliatory process and allow Daw Aung San Suu Kyi led NLD and opposition, UN, US, EU and all the opposition should guarantee the safety of Myanmar Tatmadaw and SPDC Generals. Facts to offer as carrots to the military during reconciliatory talks_Burmese opposition esp. NLD must promise and guarantee the safety of all the SPDC Generals, soldiers, USDA, Swan Arrshin and their families.

1.      U Kyi Maung’s speech of sending Military Generals esp. General Khin Nyunt to Nuremberg had made the Generals scared to death and refused any negotiation.

2.      Daw Aung San Suu Kyi also failed to convinced the Generals. She said that she could forgive and forget but whether to take action on the perpetrators of atrocities, it is up to the victims and Burmese people. In stead of those words, she should give very strong guarantee by saying that if anyone wants to revenge the Myanmar Tatmadaw Generals and personals, she would personally defend. Even should use the words, over her dead body.

When I mentioned about the granting carpet amnesty and formation of Interim government together, some of my shortsighted comrades are angry and even accused me as SPDC admirer. They pointed about the sufferings of activists who sacrificed their lives, jailed, tortured, wounded, crippled, lost jobs etc. Instead of punishing the alleged criminals or alleged offenders we should look at the Restitution process.

1.      I just pointed out to them that if they are powerful enough and could overthrow SPDC by force, go ahead. Now we are powerless, weak and we are not in any position to impose our will on SPDC by force. If we want them to transfer the power peacefully, we must negotiate and guarantee their safety.

2.      And what is the use of hanging or punishing the dethroned dictators if we ignored the sacrificed activists. Just see Iraq. We must try to forget the incidence and give up the attempt to punish them even if we could not forgive the perpetrators.

3.      Like the no fault compensation in some insurance schemes, the State of Burma/Myanmar should compensate all the sufferers, with lump some rewards, monthly pensions, giving employment, projects, land, shop-lots, interest free loans etc.

4.      Then only it will be a win-win situation for all of us, including SPDC and Tatmadaw. After all we could not disband the 400,000 strong Myanmar Tatmadaw. Just look at what happens in Iraq. Not only the jobless ex-military could give trouble, our country’s security would be compromised. We need them to protect us from foreign aggressors and hard-line separatists to prevent the total disintegration of Burma/Myanmar.

Restitution process

In some of the developed countries’ criminal laws, there are new victim-oriented, or aims for the restitution of the victims. Its goal is to repair any hurt inflicted by the offender on the victim through state authority. It is commonly combined with other aims.

1.      Restitution process is the act of restoring to the rightful owner something that has been taken away, lost, or surrendered. You could call in any name: Reparation, compensation, damages, amends, reimbursement, recompense, indemnification, offset, quittance, redress, reparation, repayment, satisfaction, setoff, substitute, reward, repay, recompense, remunerate, repayment, refund or better call as rewards for the sacrifices for the country.

2.      The act of making good or compensating for loss, damage, or injury; indemnification.

3.      A return to or restoration of a previous state or position.

4.      Act of making good or of giving the equivalent for loss, damage, or injury.

We should avoid using any local or International (ICC) criminal law if SPDC agrees for a dialogue under auspices of UN combined with other countries, e.g. ASEAN, China and India etc. No need to formally abide by the body of law local and international, that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging, and trial of suspected offenders, and fixes punishment for convicted persons.

We all must be willing to waive the rights of indictment of any person in and affiliated to SPDC and Myanmar Military according to any Laws. (Indictment means, a written statement charging a party with the commission of a crime or other offense, drawn up by a prosecuting attorney and found and presented by a grand jury.)

But if SPDC refuses for a proper dialogue_We all have enough evidences to charge the accused, SPDC and affiliated parties and Myanmar Military. They all must be prepared to be the defendant or defendants in the criminal cases, Crimes against Humanity, Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing etc. at ICC.We could prove that there is Criminal Intent by SPDC.The doctrine of transferred intent is another nuance of criminal intent. Transferred intent occurs where one intends the harm that is actually caused, but the injury occurs to a different victim or object. For example, SPDC soldier shoot the Japanese Photojournalist “accidentally” because he thought that it was a local Burmese-Chinese.  The concept of transferred intent applies to homicide, battery, and arson. Felony murder statutes evince a special brand of transferred intent. Under a felony murder statute, any death caused in the commission of, or in an attempt to commit, a felony is murder. It is not necessary to prove that the defendant intended to kill the victim.

We all could prove the Malice of the SPDC. It is a state of mind that compels a person to deliberately cause unjustifiable injury to another person. At common law, murder was the unlawful killing of one human being by another with malice aforethought, or a predetermination to kill without legal justification or excuse.

The whole world knows and we all could show the proof of the Motive of SPDC.  As Motive is the cause or reason that induces a person to form the intent to commit a crime. It is not the same as intent. Rather, it explains why the person acted to violate the law. The knowledge that SPDC will receive the permanent dominance of Myanmar Military upon the death of the demonstrators is clearly the motive for those murders or massacres. But anyway the proof of motive is not required for the conviction of a crime. The existence of motive is immaterial to the matter of guilt when that guilt is clearly established. However, when guilt is not clearly established, the presence of motive might help to establish it. If a prosecution is based entirely on circumstantial evidence, the presence of motive may be persuasive in establishing guilt; likewise, the absence of motive might support a finding of innocence.Instead of proper apology, or an acknowledgment expressing regret or asking pardon for a fault or offense from the SPDC Generals we are getting the excuses, to explain (a fault or an offense) in the hope of being forgiven or understood. SPDC falsely hope to be freed from the crimes, as from an obligation or duty. But sadly those were even not the explanations offered to justify or obtain forgiveness, nor reason or grounds for excusing: Senior General Than Shwe and other top generals must know that Ignorance is no excuse for breaking any law, local or ICC.An excuse is essentially a defense for an individual’s conduct that is intended to mitigate the individual’s blameworthiness for a particular act or to explain why the individual acted in a specific manner.Don’t make excuses, make good.

Two wrongs don’t make a right, but they make a good excuse.” Thomas Szasz.

And oftentimes excusing of a fault doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.” William Shakespeare.  To be excused from liability means that although the defendant may have been a participant in the sequence of events leading to the prohibited outcome, no liability will attach to the particular defendant because he or she belongs to a class of person exempted from liability. In normal circumstances, this will be a policy of expediency. Hence, members of the armed forces, the police or other civil organizations may be granted a degree of immunity for causing prohibited outcomes while acting in the course of their official duties, e.g. for an assault or trespass to the person caused during a lawful arrest. But in the Cases of the Crimes against Humanity, Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing or the Massacre of peaceful demonstrators and the point-blank shoot to killing of the Japanese Photojournalist cases at the ICC the above excuses are not valid at all.But SPDC Generals are adamant, impervious to pleas, appeals, or reason; stubbornly unyielding. They stood firmly, often unreasonably immovable in purpose or will: They are inflexible, not easily bent; stiff or rigid. Incapable of being changed; unalterable nor unyielding in purpose, principle, or temper; immovable. They are not exorable or capable of being moved by entreaty; pitiful; tender. They are stubborn, unreasonably, often perversely unyielding; bullheaded. Or firmly resolved or determined; resolute, obstinate, characterized by unnecessary perseverance and persistent. They are difficult to treat or deal with; resistant to treatment or effort: stubborn soil; stubborn stains.

SPDC Generals should understand that they could not claim for the Diplomatic Immunity as they are not diplomats. It is for the exemption from taxation and ordinary processes of law afforded to diplomatic personnel in a foreign country only.

SPDC Generals should also understand that they could not claim for the executive privilege, exemption of the executive branch of government, or its officers, from having to give evidence, specifically, the exemption of the head of the government from disclosing information to inquiries or the judiciary. Claims of executive privilege are usually invoked to protect confidential military or diplomatic operations or to protect the private discussions and debates of the president with close aides. Efforts by various the head of the governments to gain absolute and unqualified privilege have been rejected by the International Criminal Courts, though the local remain inclined to support most claims of executive privilege. Where criminal charges are being brought against the head of the government, the claims of executive privilege are weakest.The International Court of Justice (ICJ) (also known as World Court) is the judiciary organ of the United Nations. It settles disputes submitted to it voluntarily by states (only), and gives advisory opinions on legal questions submitted to it by other organs of the UN, such as the General Assembly or Security Council. A recent development in international law is the International Criminal Court (ICC), the first ever permanent international criminal court, which was established to ensure that the gravest international crimes do not go unpunished. The ICC treaty was signed by 139 national governments, of which 100 ratified it into law by October 2005.Command responsibility, sometimes referred to as the Yamashita standard or the Medina standard, is the doctrine of hierarchical accountability in cases of war and serious crimes. The doctrine of “command responsibility” was established by the Hague Conventions IV (1907) and X (1907). The “Yamashita standard” is based upon the precedent set by the United States Supreme Court in the case of Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita. He was prosecuted, in a still controversial trial, for atrocities committed by troops under his command in the Philippines. Yamashita was charged with “unlawfully disregarding and failing to discharge his duty as a commander to control the acts of members of his command by permitting them to commit war crimes.” The “Medina standard” is based upon the prosecution of US Army Captain Ernest Medina in connection with the My Lai Massacre during the Vietnam War. It holds that a commanding officer, being aware of a human rights violation or a war crime, will be held criminally liable when he does not take action. In The Art of War, written during the 6th BC, Sun Tzu, argued that it was a commander’s duty to ensure that his subordinates conducted themselves in a civilized manner during an armed conflict.The Hague Conventions IV (1907) was the first attempt at codifying the principle of command responsibility on a multinational level. It was not until after WWI that the Allied Powers’ Commission on the Responsibility of the Authors of the War and on the Enforcement of Penalties recommended the establishment of an international tribunal, which would try individuals for “order[ing], or, with knowledge thereof and with power to intervene, abstain[ing] from preventing or taking measures to prevent, putting an end to or repressing, violations of the laws or customs of war.”Introducing responsibility for an omission(Tomoyuki Yamashita, 1945)Command responsibility is an omission mode of individual criminal liability: the superior is responsible for crimes committed by his subordinates and for failing to prevent or punish (as opposed to crimes he ordered). Following In re Yamashita courts clearly accepted that a commander’s actual knowledge of unlawful actions is sufficient to impose individual criminal responsibilityAdditional Protocol IThe first international treaty to comprehensively codify the doctrine of command responsibility was the Additional Protocol I (“AP I”) of 1977 to the Geneva Conventions of 1949. Article 86(2) states that:The fact that a breach of the Conventions or of this Protocol was committed by a subordinate does not absolve his superiors from …responsibility …

  1. if they knew, or

  2. had information which should have enabled them to conclude in the circumstances at the time,

  3. that he was committing or

  4. about to commit such a breach and

  5. if they did not take all feasible measures within their power to prevent or repress the breach.

Article 87 obliges a commander to “prevent and, where necessary, to suppress and report to competent authorities” any violation of the Conventions and of AP I.In Article 86(2) for the first time a provision would “explicitly address the knowledge factor of command responsibility.”The term “command” can be defined as_A.  De jure (legal) command, which can be both military and civilian. The determining factor here is not rank but subordination. Four structures are identified:1.      Policy command: heads of state, high-ranking government officials, monarchs

  1. Strategic command: War Cabinet, Joint Chiefs of Staff

  2. Operational command: military leadership; in Yamashita it was established that operational command responsibility cannot be ceded for the purpose of the doctrine of command responsibility – operational commanders must exercise the full potential of their authority to prevent war crimes, failure to supervise subordinates or non-assertive orders don’t exonerate the commander.

  3. Tactical command: direct command over troops on the ground

B. De facto (factual) command, which specifies effective control, as opposed to formal rank. This needs a superior-subordinate relationship. They are:

  1. Capacity to issue orders

  2. Power of influence: influence is recognized as a source of authority in the Ministries case before the US military Tribunal after World War II.

  3. Evidence stemming from distribution of tasks: the ICTY has established the Nikolic test – superior status is deduced from analysis of distribution of tasks within the unit, it applies both to operational and POW camp commanders.

Additional Protocol I and the Statutes of the ICTY, the ICTR, and the ICC makes prevention or prosecution of crimes mandatoryThe Nuremberg Charter determined the basis to prosecute people for:

  1. Crimes against humanity: murder, extermination, enslavement, deportation, and other inhuman acts committed against any civilian population, before or during the war, or persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds in execution of or in connection with any crime within the jurisdiction of the Tribunal, whether or not in violation of the domestic law of the country where perpetrated.

The jurisdiction ratione personae is considered to apply to “leaders, organisers, instigators and accomplices” involved in planning and committing those crimes.Restitution process to consider for all the Myanmar/Burmese citizens abroad.

Although there are some sympathetic considerations for the Burmese/Myanmar citizens by few countries, most of us unfairly discriminated even amongst foreigners in many countries.

Except for the US and EU countries, ASEAN, China and India etc. countries wish to continue their trade ties with the SPDC Junta. In their own local countries’ laws and international laws, those who try to cover up the crimes, protect the criminals or accepting the ill-gotten property or money is illegal criminal offence, many countries are willing to continue the relations with those SPDC Criminals. And they are the ones who are punishing the Burmese/Myanmar citizens because of the acts of the successive military leaders.

 

Because the military government refused to sign visa free status to their citizens, esp. ASEAN governments, they denied the ordinary Myanmar/ Burmese these rights of visa free status. But with the excuse of government to government dealing, they granted visa free for the military authorities of Myanmar.

Although they (esp. ASEAN governments) signed the double taxation agreement with the military government they refused (esp. ASEAN governments) denied the rights of the Burmese citizens after Myanmar Embassies illegally taxed their citizens abroad.

We are not asking for special favors or the facilities that are reserved for your citizens only. But please kindly treat all of us with the same privileges or chances or favors you all reserved to your most favored foreigners from your most favored countries.

Why US, EU, Australia, Canada, Singapore and other developed countries could give training jobs for the SPDC selected and sent specialists but not the individual, private Myanmar/Burmese doctors, engineers etc. Especially UK, US and Singapore not only refused to recognize the Myanmar Medical degrees but also refused the privately applied individuals for the training posts but always ready to grant to the SPDC doctors.

EU especially UK Medical Council, Immigration etc. are also giving special privileges to the fellow EU countries’ workers, professionals and doctors. EU and UK should give the same privileges to the Burmese/Myanmar citizens as a special arrangement as part of the restitution process.

UK professional governing bodies such as GMC stop Burmese Medical degree recognition because the military government ignored their supervision process. And the other professional bodies and other countries such as Singapore, Hong Kong, Brunei follow the UK trend and derecognize as. All the countries are punishing Burmese/Myanmar professionals because of Myanmar Military Juntas’ action. At least you all should allow all the Burmese professionals after supervision/temporary registrations as internships (House Surgeons, House Officers etc.) for few years. ASEAN scholarships and many other training and scholarships given out by e.g. other government, semi-government and private big companies’ (PETRONAS, IJN etc.) are usually given to SPDC selected candidates.

If ASEAN wish to keep Myanmar SPDC in ASEAN, do not wish to jeopardize their cozy relation relationships, they could continue given them as G to G arrangement but they all should offer the same amount of scholarships and training posts to the private individual Burmese/Myanmar citizens.

In some of the developed countries’ criminal laws, there are new victim-oriented, or aims for the restitution of the victims. Its goal is to repair any hurt inflicted by the offender on the victim through state authority.

Please kindly allow me to request world leaders, UN, US, EU, ASEAN, Japan, Korea etc to kindly consider to help made it easier for the various Myanmar/Burmese migrants to work, study, settle or take refuge in your countries.

Singapore should give Myanmar professionals and others as the same privileges for allowing to work and practice, as those from Hong Kong, Taiwan and other western countries.  Malaysia should accept the Myanmar professionals and citizens with the same fast tract that they had accorded to their brothers, Indonesians.

We could even see a lot of Indonesian sweepers, toilet cleaners holding the Malaysian Red and Blue ICs. Some of the MPs, Ministers, Chief Ministers are also Indonesian Malaysians. Some are just second generation migrants only, e.g. the present Selangore Chief Minister. His father was reported in the Malaysian English daily to be an Indonesian migrated into Malaysia as a lorry driver! But it is very difficult even for a Burmese professional to get a PR. It is almost impossible to get the citizenship because of red tapes and conditions and requirements imposed on all others except for Indonesians.  

We all know the very special status and support given by Malaysia on Bosnia and other refugees. Talking about refugees, the western democracies are also rumoured to have secretly instructed the UNHCR to accept ONE ETHNIC MINORITY professing ONE RELIGION only. It is difficult to prove but all of us could see very clearly.

If Singapore and Malaysia wish to continue to accept Myanmar SPDC, they should seriously consider compensating Myanmar/ Burmese citizens with the special privileges they used to extend other preferred foreigners. 

At first many leaders around the world could not believe or some of them closed their eyes or look away from our country and blatantly claimed that there is no war in Myanmar, no atrocities committed on various minority religious groups and ethnic minorities. Even those practising the same religion or descended from the same ethnic groups denied or brushed off that there was no ethnic cleansing, racial and religious in Myanmar, just to easily deny a helping hand to those who migrated and requested to easy resettlement or refuge in their countries.It is a blessing in disguised that the stupid or dumb SPDC military generals decided to use force on peacefully demonstrating revered monks and the Burmese civilians. Now the SPDC’s real natured is exposed and the whole world had witness with their eyes about the cruel Myanmar Military. And it is clear that they are defiant and never give a dam care to the UN, UNSC, world political and religious leaders’ appeals.

We, Burmese expartrites, wish to look forward and prepare for the future of our whole family and our relatives.  We don’t want to look back over our shoulders with fear nor maintain the umbilical cord with the Myanmar, we left. 

As it now stands, we cannot plan for our future because of the ASEAN governments’ very strict policy of citizenship rules.  Our wish to give undivided full loyalty to our adopted new home cannot be fulfilled.We could not sponsor even our closed relatives; parents, brothers, sisters etc.

ASEAN governments should kindly reconsider this present ruling. After all, if our parents and near relatives are here, out of Myanmar, no need to send our money back home to Myanmar but need to spend in your own country!

The Myanmar Embassies around the world are so happy to collect income taxes (obviously double taxation for all the Myanmar PP holders) and all the various exuberant fees to endorse, renew and for issuing of new Passports.           

When the Malaysian government announced that they are building 3000 (three thousand) schools for the INDONESIAN MIGRANTS’ children, they put out the order that other MIGRANTS’ are not allowed to attend the government schools. This includes the legal workers, professionals and doctors working even for the Malaysian government. Even the highest pay migrant professional doctors’ salary in Malaysia is less than the ambulance driver’s salary in the west, they could not afford to send to the very expensive private schools. I am worried about the emergence of illiterate Myanmar refugees in a dozen of year from now in Malaysia, giving social problems as they are denied schooling because their parents came from Myanmar but not from INDONESIA.

And UIA or IIU (International Islamic University) had accepted Burmese students in their Medical Faculty before. But now they totally refused to accept Burmese Students in Medical course.

 The funniest and shameful thing is that the Islamic College in Malaysia tried to refuse Myanmar students (even the Muslim students) because they don’t have the agreement with the SPDC atheist government. But they are willing to accept even the Hindu students from India because Indian government signed an agreement with them. They seems to be out of touch with foreign news, even failed to watch the Al Jazeera TV channel about SPDC atheist government soldiers beating and killing of monks. I hope that the college authorities are not glued to MTV and TVB all the time and are ignorant about the ethnic cleansing and Genocide of Muslims in Myanmar/Burma.

 

No wander all of their OIC leaders used to shamelessly ignore the plights of discriminated downtrodden minority Muslims from Myanmar/Burma, Kashmir, Chechnya, Xingan, Yunnan, and from all over the world but KEEP ON DENOUNCING ISRAEL and US. And KEEP ON SUPPORTING PALESTINES and IRAQ uselessly as parrots. 

Defiant Recalcitrant Myanmar Military Junta

Defiant Recalcitrant
Myanmar Military Junta

Dr San Oo Aung

The SPDC military regime was under tremendous international pressure for its bloody violent and inhumane crackdown on peaceful protesters led by revered Buddhist monks, peaceful demonstrators and activists. Thanks to the internet, ICT, mobile and satellite communication technology and the digital photo and movie equipments, now only the world understands and believes the news about Myanmar Tatmadaw’s atrocities keep on trickling out of the country regularly in about half of the century. Now only, the whole world could accept the truth that Myanmar Tatmadaw would dare to do anything on earth to the minority ethnic races and religious groups away from the public scrutiny in the small towns, in the jungles as they had witness with their own eyes and could draw a conclusion that if they could do these atrocities even on the unarmed, peaceful, revered monks in the centre of the biggest cities in front of all the people, the crimes against humanity, genocide, ethnic cleansing, rape, torture, forced relocation, murder, rape etc by the Myanmar Tatmadaw on its ethnic minorities, religious minorities, Depayin Messacre, 1988 Massacre, 1962 dynamiting of the Rangoon University Students Union building with the student leaders inside, NLD members and opposition politicians are credible and possible. There is no smoke without the fire!

The whole world witnessed that Senior General Than Shwe and SPDC Junta had clearly committed the crimes against the humanity during the latest incident.   But SPDC never shown any remorse, regret, sorrow, repentance, take the accountability, take responsibility, any shame, do not feel guilty or intimidated, and do not own up the blame. Furthermore they keep on continuing with their atrocities and are openly declaring that they are right, the victims are wrong and are going to round up those “guilty” people and monks who dare to demonstrate against the Junta.

They are in a ‘Defiant mode’, even blaming the unfortunate victims. They announced in their newspapers that if the monks never come out to protest, they would not be arrested nor killed. The official New Light of Myanmar newspaper, a government mouthpiece, said that if the monks had remained in their monasteries, “the government would not have used force to prevent protests.”

Deeds are more important than words. We could try to understand that the SPDC Generals are shy to admit their faults or crimes. Their acts and behaviors could be easily described in Burmese_

Ma Yae thay lae_Pyae Khae sae.

Kyauk_kan_Kan_thee.

Even if it is very difficult to say sorry, they should not act deaf and dumb to the cries of the Burmese Buddhist Monks and ordinary poor citizens. They should heed the advices of UNSC, the Western Democratic countries’ voices and of their cronies ASEAN and close supporters China and
India.

Now they are far from redemption or salvation. We all should not forgive nor forget their Crimes against Humanity committed on the unarmed civilians and peaceful revered monks. Just look at the stubborn Junta’s continuous committing of atrocities in their country called
Myanmar.

A Buddhist monk had been jailed for seven and a half years for taking part in protests against the junta. Eik Darea, 26, was the first monk known to have been sentenced for his part in protests led by monks in several cities around the former Burma. He was also defrocked and could end up in a labour camp. “He was arrested in Maungdaw, on the Bangladesh border. He was forced to leave holy orders and sent up for trial at a closed court in Sittwe, and was charged with inciting public unrest and illegal association.” There were other monks in Rakhine jails who were also expected to face trial. “Manhunts are still going on in Rakhine State. Some are still on the run. Some are missing.” There has been no word yet of closed trials in Yangon, where soldiers raided more than 20 monasteries, taking most of their monks into custody, in the early stages of the crackdown. Nighttime raids are still going on despite United Nations special envoy Ibrahim Gambari, now touring Asia in search of support for a united front to persuade the generals to talk to the opposition and urging an end to raids and arrest “at once”. The relatives said five members of detained democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy were jailed for up to seven and a half years on similar charges to Eik Darea, also in trials closed to the public.

Four members of Aung San Suu Kyi’s Opposition party have been sentenced to more than seven years in prison in secret trials in western Myanmar, a spokesman said. They were arrested near the western port city of Sittwe, one of several places around the country where Buddhist monks led marches against the military government in the biggest pro-democracy protest in nearly 20 years. “So far we have confirmation that four people were each sentenced to seven and a half years in prison. They were accused of taking a leading role in the monks’ protests” in Sittwe, said Han Thar Myin, spokesman for the National League for Democracy (NLD). Among those sentenced was 85-year old Kyaw Khine, the head of the NLD chapter in Taunggok township outside Sittwe, the spokesman said. The three others were identified as Than Pe, Tun Kyi and Sein Kyaw.

  1. They shamelessly lie to the Japanese government through their media and officially through their Myanmar Ambassador in Japan that the Japanese photojournalist was hit by a stray bullet.

  2. Later they shamelessly lie again as it was an accident.

  3. At last they tried to shift the blame on to the poor dead victim.

  4. He only has to blame as he entered Myanmar with a tourist visa instead of a proper Journalist visa.

  5. And the authorities had already warned about the dangerous situation but the Japanese Journalist was responsible for putting himself into a deadly danger by “staying on at the killing field.”

SPDC junta shrugged off US, EU, Japan cut aid and European nations widened sanctions and their friends’ efforts to punish them for the bloody crackdown on protesters. SPDC Generals vowed to resist. “We will march on. There is no reason to change the course,” through the official New Light of Myanmar newspaper. Defiant Myanmar junta says it won’t back down from its on pace of walking along the road map they invented to pull the wool over the eyes of the public and the international leaders.

Myanmar Military defiently announced another step on its “road map” to democracy by drafting a new charter by the formation of the charter committee followed the conclusion of 14 years of world record marathon sham talks just on drafting guidelines for a new constitution. SPDC has set no timetable for the drawing of this charter process. Under the regime’s “road map” to “democracy”, the new constitution is to be voted in a referendum, elections would follows on their military’s terms and conditions. They are doing what they like without considering the unacceptence of their road map by the Burmese Citizens and International Community. Their deeds could be described in Burmese, “Nga Myin Ngar Saing _Sagaing Yauk Yauk. Nga Hlae Ngar Htoe_Bago Yauk Yauk.”

SPDC had announced the world that they holding about 3000 people in detention centers nationwide. That is after the death of few hundred people, including a Japanese journalist according to the observers. There were reports that the military had cremated the severely wounded alive victims together with the death bodies at Ye way cemetery crematorium.

They ignored the last ritual rights of the dead persons. Not only the Buddhists, Christians, Muslims or Hindus but even the wild atheist’s have their own obligations and rituals as a last respect for the death. Even the executed bodies of the convicted criminals are regularly given back to their own families for the proper last rituals and prayers.

The junta also dares to criticize back the UN Security Council statement condemning violence used by the army to crush the biggest anti-government protests and calling for the release of political prisoners. “The situation in Myanmar does not constitute a threat to regional and international peace and security,” it shamelessly lied. “In reality, there is no one in Myanmar who is in prison for political reasons. There are only those against whom action has been taken in violation of the existing laws.”

Ban said the way demonstrators were treated was “abhorrent and unacceptable”. Ban again urged the military government to move more quickly towards democracy. “I would strongly urge the Myanmar authorities to implement fully the seven-point road map for democratization,” he said in New York. SPDC Junta newspapers openly said that they are continuing man-hunt to hunt down any one who involved in monk-lad demonstrations. Junta started giving long prison sentences to Monk and laymen activists. Junta confirms that they would press ahead with their own roadmap. Junta said Burmese people calling for UN intervention are all traitors and that such traitors will meet tragic ends. Junta is clearly showing defiance against UN and international pressures.

UN envoy Ibrahim Gambari denounced the SPDC in Bangkok that reports of further arrests of activists were “extremely disturbing.” And that continued searching, rounding up, arresting, torturing of democracy activists is mocking his agreement with the SPDC.   He is touring around Asia to strengthen the regional pressure on the junta. He suggested a carrot-and-stick approach, saying that in addition to tough action the regime should be offered incentives to reform.

Myanmar’s military junta acknowledged through their official statement on the front-page of The New Light of Myanmar, a government mouthpiece, said they were still hunting for demonstrators who took part in the recent uprising. “Those who led, got involved in and supported the unrest which broke out in September were called in and are being interrogated,” the junta said. “Some are still being called in for questioning and those who should be released will be.” The statement said that 2,927 people had been arrested since the crackdown started and nearly 500 were still in custody. Diplomats and dissidents say they believe up to 6,000 people were arrested in the crackdown, including thousands of monks who led the rallies. They also believe the toll is much higher than the official figure of 10 given by the military when troops fired into crowds on September 26 and 27.

The present incident or our uprising is just one of the Tribulations. It means a state of pain or anguish that tests one’s resiliency and character or something that is hard to bear physically or emotionally. Tribulation is a period of time where believers will experience worldwide persecution and be purified and strengthened by it.

Tribulation will not hurt you, unless it does – what alas! It too often does – unless it hardens you and makes you sour and narrow and skeptical. — Edwin Hubbel Chapin (1814-1880)

We understand and accept that a secure, nonviolent outlet policy for the generals and a peaceful transitional government should be aimed. This could prevent Burma avoid the fate of
Iraq and Yugoslav.

UN special envoy Ibrahim Gambari, who is currently touring Asia seeking to increase the pressure on the regime to change course, said the junta must be offered incentives along with the tough words. He said he backed a combination of “strong encouragement of the authorities of Myanmar to do the right thing along with some incentives to say that… the world is not just there to punish Myanmar.” Gambari said one approach could be “a combination of strong encouragement of the authorities in Myanmar to do the right thing along with some incentives to say that … the world is not there just to punish Myanmar.”

But the SPDC Generals must understand and accept the truth that although they think they could crush our uprising ruthlessly, it is the calmness physically like the calm of the deep sea. But they could not crush our spirit as we had shown our courage, sacrificing our lives and limbs repeatedly, although we are facing the well equipped SPDC full force of military with our bare hands.

Senior General Than Shwe should just look at General Soe Win. He could not carry away his wealth to the hereafter but had left all. Even if any Buddhists wishes to take along the cash, one could put a 25 cents coin only into the death’s mouth. If Senior General Than Shwe wish to made a special customized 25 cents coin with the gold studded with diamond, there is a danger of tomb readers trying to rob from his grave. Even if he think he would be able to arrange to protect the looting that precious coin it would remain in the rotting skull of his dead body but would never follow him to the his next reincarnating lives.

 SPDC should understand that we will never take down our fighting peacock flag even if we all need to sacrifice our lives and leave the democracy boat empty. We are just following the guidance of our beloved Bo Gyoke Aung San who wrote, “My head is bleeding but I will never surrender.”Dear SPDC Generals, please read the following articles and let us really start a meaningful dialogue for the National Reconciliation and start a new face of reconstructing our beloved country by work together democratically without excluding or endangering any party and without trying to monopolized by one party or one group.

  1. Hoping for a National Reconciliation  
  2. Update your concepts to WIN-WIN Solution  

  3. Generosity Makes us Great  

  4. Opening Heart on Equal Rights for All Ethnic Groups

UN, US and EU should investigate the discriminating ASEAN laws on Burmese citizens

 Be careful Dr Gambari, in dealing with Singapore led ASEAN

UN, US and EU should investigate the discriminating ASEAN laws, rules and regulations  of ASEAN imposed on Myanmar/Burmese citizens as modern Apartheid.

Be careful Dr Gambari, Singapore led ASEAN is selfish, greedy, cunning, have kaisu culture and are going to keep Myanmar SPDC Junta as an ASEAN member forever, under their protection, so that they would be able to exploit its remaining wealth. They all are hypocrites, just giving a lip service to made themselves look good infront of the international media.

At the same time, they will continue to discriminate the Myanmar citizens in their own countries.

Even amongst foreigners, we all are unfairly discriminated with ASEAN  Apartheid Laws.

Even amongsts foreigners, they give favour to the Europeans, Americans, Arabs, Australians, Japanese, Koreans, Taiwanese, Hongkoners, Indonesians, Commonwealth members and their other fellow ASEAN members other than Myanmars. 

All the rich ASEAN countries especially; Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand are shamelessly and unfairly practicing the discriminating extra rules and regulations as RED TAPES on all the Myanmar citizens. UN, US and EU should look at those practices, laws, red tapes as modern Apartheid.

Although all the ASEAN governments are willingly giving FULL ASEAN membership status to the illegitimate SPDC Junta, they are not granting the Myanmar/Burma citizens same rights and privileges that are usually extended to all other ASEAN citizens. The talk of ASEAN CHARTER and ASEAN INTEGRATION is EMPTY and RHETORIC.

BE careful ASEAN Governments, we, Burmese people WILL NEVER FORGIVE NOR FORGET your double standards in dealing with our citizens and at the same time keep on supporting the cruel SPDC Military Junta.

We all know and saw with our eyes how you had given special privileges to other FOREIGNERS and REFUGEES but blatantly denied to extend on all the Burmese Citizens in your countries.

We all know and saw with our eyes how you had given:

  1. visa free status,

  2. scholarships, (Almost all of your scholarships and training facilities are all taken up by the family members, relatives and cronies of Myanmar Military.)

  3. student visas,

  4. Employment Passes,

  5. Refugee status,

  6. Work Permits,

  7. Permanent Residence status,

  8. Granting of full citizenships,

  9. Business licenses,

  10. Medical Registrations,

  11. Practicing certificates for lawyers, engineers etc.

with fast tracts to other foreigners but denied or delayed or refused to extend the same privileges on Burmese citizens coming to your ASEAN countries for a visit, work, study, migrate or taking refuge.

Ethnic and religious links seem to play little or no part in the negotiations when considering the re-settlement of Burmese refugees.   Refugees like the Burma’s Shans in Thailand (who are known as Thai Yai, meaning Big T hai) are likewise cold-shouldered by the hosts.  Thais do not wish to keep their ethnically similar Buddhist brothers, Shans, Mons and Karens. (There are Buddhist and Christian Karens.)  Some historians have commented that Thais seem to have a hidden agenda in keeping their cousins, some of whom are rebels, as a buffer against their strong Burmese enemy.  This has been going on for few centuries. 

        Chins in India are related to the Mizorams and Rohingyas (who are closely related to Chittagonians) in Bangladesh, and Burmese Muslims in Malaysia also are facing the same problems with their ethnic and religious “brothers”. 

(g)   Because of all these problems, it was no wonder that at the meeting organized  among Altsean-Burma, Burma Border Consortium, Burma Issues, Forum Asia, Jesuit Refugee Service and Non-Violence International, which coincided with the visit to Pang Tractor refugee camp in Maehongson by Rev Jesse Jackson, the scathing remarks of Sunai Phasuk from The Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (better known as Forum Asia) were made: 

“UN High Commissioner on Refugees is doing little to protect its charges.”  

Dr Mark Tamthai of Thailand’s National Security Council (NSC) supported Sunai Phasuk’s attack. 

        Ms Kirsten Young from the UNHCR’s Bangkok regional office lamely replied that “refugee protection is mainly state responsibility.”  

Almost impossible to improve Burma/Myanmar’S POLITICAL SITUATION 

First of all, we have to accept that we cannot do anything to improve the political conditions in Burma.

  1. No country is willing to wage a war for a “REGIME CHANGE” in Burma/Myanmar.  If not for the 9-11 tragedy and the bad experience of expensive, bitter, and protracted rebellions in Iraq, there would be hope for more aggressive action by the US in Burma.

  1. China India and ASEAN countries, especially Thailand are not only on the J unta’s side but are also protecting them from the West’s economic sanctions and political attacks.

    • We still remember the days after the 1967 anti-Chinese riots and the killing of thousands of Chinese in Yangon.  Communist China gave full support to the Burmese Communist Party.  There were rumours, surely over-exaggerated, that 100,000 Red Army soldiers “deserte d” the Chinese Army, wore the new Wa rebel uniforms, and joined the Burma Communist compatriots. They failed to dislodge the Junta.

    • India’s few decades of support to the pro-democracy forces also failed.

    • It was reported in the Burmese newspapers that Burma’s last democratically elected Prime Minister U Nu had decided to return to Burma after abandoning his Government in exile in Thailand.  The Burmese newspapers alleged that the neighbour’s Deputy Defence Minister offered full financial and military support if U Nu agreed to allow Shan State to join their country after independence.  This may be also have been a lie to drum up the nationalist spirit of Burmans to support the unpopular Military government.

Important Note: we are not revealing or repeating the above rumours and unfounded allegations to accuse any country, nor do we even wish to know the truth.  (Some of us may even wish for this kind of external help nowadays.)  We only wish to prove that even under these adverse conditions, there was no successful regime change.  Further, with the present reversal of conditions of switching supports by all Burma’s neighbours, it is almost impossible to topple the Junta.

  1. Even if NLD got the chance to f orm a government and democracy prevails, the Ethnic Minority and minority Religions would continue to suffer the discriminations of their Big Brother, the Burman Buddhists.

  1. Even if all transferring of power could be smooth and rapid, it would take at least a generation to change the habits and mindsets of the government and private sector employees, and to rebuild the economic infrastructure to be on par with that of the developing neighbours’.

    7,   Myanmar’s crippling economy and stifled demands for political and economic reforms will fuel more racial violence in the near future.  The Military government may incite racial and religious hatred in order to take advantage and profit from the riots.  Both sides will promote this with their own agendas.  The Government will try to divert the attention of the people’s hatred and anger directed to them.  They need a scapegoat for their economic and political failures.  It will succeed as this divide-and-rule policy is a well-tested and effective policy. In addition, it will also show all the minorities that the government is their protector.  At the same time, the government can prove that they were needed to unite the country and for the maintenance of internal peace.  The bogeyman is needed to drum up support for them and all the people are coerced to unite behind the Military leaders. The anti-migrant policy, anti-foreigner policy, foreign threats, Communists and western countries’ imperialist plots, and danger of racial and religious riots, are used effectively and successfully by numerous dictators all over the world.

  1. Most of the governments around the world never try to understand the very reasons many Burmese Citizens of all races and religions wish to leave their country in the first instance.  To state a few:

·        Racial and religious discriminatory policies that suck the life out of minority ethnic and religious groups, sometimes amounting to ethnic cleansings.  

·        Cruel and lawless Military dictators’ oppressive and ever changing unjust laws, created according to their whims and fancies. 

·        The lopsided military-appointed eunuch judiciary who is always loyal and obedient to the Military rulers.

      Widespread corruption, abuse of power and absence of accountability at each and every level of the government machinery.

·        The police also ignore the rule of law but rule by the law, ordered by their army masters.

·        Dozens of local armed militia groups signed peace treaty with the army, and the still active Ethnic Minority rebels at the Burma borders are also crushing the people from other side.

·        There may be not an obvious war but there are internal conflicts or rebellions as well as a lot of internally displaced persons in Burma.

 

·        Numerous restrictions on the people’s daily life, travel, investments, trade, monetary policy, transport of goods, import/export, religion, education, etc. are pushing the people to their limits. 

 

9.            As long as there is no respect for the RIGHTS OF ETHNIC MINORITIES AND DISCRIMINATIONS against the minority religions, there is no hope of stopping people leaving Myanmar.  Mary Robinson, High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002) wrote: “… today’s human rights violations are the causes of tomorrow’s conflicts.”

On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples a nd all nations.

 On the 50th Anniversary of this Declaration, UN Security General Kofi Annan said:   

   “Human Rights are foreign to no culture and native to all Nations.  It is a mirror that at once flatters us and shames us, that bears witness to a record of progress for parts of humanity while revealing a history and reality of horrors for others.” 

“It was never the people who complained of the universality of human rights, nor did the people consider human rights as a Western or Northern imposition.  It was often their leaders who did so.”           

After looking at the above quotations, real conditions in Burma/Myanmar and the people’s plight, we do not need to give any further evidence to convince the reader that there are a lot of problems going on in Burma/Myanmar that are almost impossible to solve or change, and no one can prevent the people’s flight out of the country.

On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples a nd all nations.

 On the 50th Anniversary of this Declaration, UN Security General Kofi Annan said:   

   “Human Rights are foreign to no culture and native to all Nations.  It is a mirror that at once flatters us and shames us, that bears witness to a record of progress for parts of humanity while revealing a history and reality of horrors for others.” 

“It was never the people who complained of the universality of human rights, nor did the people consider human rights as a Western or Northern imposition.  It was often their leaders who did so.”           

After looking at the above quotations, real conditions in Burma/Myanmar and the people’s plight, we do not need to give any further evidence to convince the reader that there are a lot of problems going on in Burma/Myanmar that are almost impossible to solve or change, and no one can prevent the people’s flight out of the country.

Myanmar activists go into fighting mode

Myanmar activists go into fighting mode

By : Koh Lay Chin

NST journalist Koh Lay Chin is on a Master’s programme at the London School of Economics.laych@nstp.com.my

Activists demonstrating against the  junta have become common around the world following the military crackdown against the leaders behind pro-democracy rallies  in Myanmar.
Activists demonstrating against the junta have become common around the world following the military crackdown against the leaders behind pro-democracy rallies in Myanmar.

LAST Sunday, I watched four students eagerly crawl into a cage.

It has been an interesting two weeks in Britain so far. You just cannot get away from these Free Myanmar protesters.

The previous weekend at Trafalgar Square, I met a Myanmar protester named San at an Amnesty-organised march, where thousands of all colours were decked out in red. Bright-eyed and cheerful, he was with a group armed with caps, flyers, forms and an enthusiasm to reach out.

Read more

Wake up call for UNHCR

Wake up call for UNHCR

_ By Dr Zafar Shah

In the March 15 Malaysiakini, A Burmese refugee who served as an interpreter with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) office in Kuala Lumpur accused his former colleagues of discrimination. He claimed that the Rohingyas were sidelined and he requested to give an equal treatment. UNCHR denied the allegation because it cannot reveal the truth behind this episode. Before that, there were posters condemning UNHCR in downtown Kuala Lumpur and some refugees protested in front of UNHCR head office. Previously there were also protests against UNHCR in Thailand, India and Bangladesh by the Myanmar refugees. There were also strong exchanges of words between UNHCR and Malaysian authorities off and on.

Myanmar refugees accused UNHCR officers that they are sleeping on the job after taking five figure salaries. Actually, UNHCR’s hands were virtually tied because they have to search for the volunteer third party countries that would accept and allow settling of refugees.  Nowadays these countries told unofficially but firmly to the UNHCR that they are only willing to accept the non-Muslim refugees only. 

(Muslims could not blame them because that is the result of the acts of our fellow Muslim Refugees settled in Denmark, UK, French and Australia and because of the 9-11 incident in US.)

It is time to wake up and face the reality, UNHCR officers. You need to think out of the box to free the refugees out of this dilemma. Let’s see what is beyond UNHCR’s capacity and later search for what they could do. 

A.      UNHCR could not do the followings_

1.      UNHCR have to accept that they cannot do anything to improve the socio-political conditions back in the source country, Myanmar. (They cold not force the regime change of Myanmar nor even force the Myanmar to change the policy on its minorities. Even at the UNSC the western countries’ resolution on Myanmar was blocked.)

2.      UNHCR could not force the present third countries accepting refugees to accept more refugees or to take Muslim refugees.

3.      UNHCR’s present blaming and pressuring of Malaysian Home Ministry or other host countries could not generate any fruitful results.

4.      As the democratic countries, host countries have to consider the sensitivities of their voters and their countries’ politico-religious conditions. (The western countries would never reveal officially that they do not want the Muslim refugees and Malaysia would never tell that they prefer Malay-Indonesian blooded Refugees only.)

B.      UNHCR should  try to do the followings_

1.      Persuade OIC member Muslim countries with the help of Malaysian Government and UNSG’s office to start to accept Myanmar Refugees.

2.      Actually, refugees are like unpolished gemstones. Most of the countries do not know the true value of the refugees. UNHCR should shine them so that other countries would appreciate them.

(a)     UNHCR should polish the refugees of their basic skills to turn them into a good workforce. UNHCR should open vocational training and language training centres according to the demand.

(b)     UNHCR should form a work force training, management and supply company.

(c)      UNHCR should negotiate with multinational companies and countries around the world to accept them on contract basis.

(d)     UNHCR should issue Certificate of Identity in lieu of International Passports for all the refugees, political or economic migrants in Malaysia.

3.      Then only UNHCR could do away with the present prolonged period for the interviews and investigations. In Burma, there is a widespread socio-economic problem which is difficult to resolve. As almost the whole population of Burma is suffering under the autocratic Junta, we hope it is not necessary to differentiate between these two categories. If we do away with this differentiation, the resettlement process will be faster. 

4.      Once UNHCR issued the Certificate of Identity in lieu of International Passports (C of I or PP) to all the Burmese refugees, illegal immigrants, all of them can freely apply for visas and search for jobs around the world.

5.      UNHCR has to work with its parent United Nations, ILO, WTO, WHO, UNDP, UNICEF, international and local NGOs, World Bank, Interpol and the countries around the world so that they could successfully implement this project.

6.      With the GLOBLISATION, UNHCR and UN should initiate, persuade, negotiate, and press for the free manpower mobilization to balance the socio-economic imbalances around the world.

7.      To fund this project, UNHCR could start with its budget but could re quest funds from the donor countries that used to accept the refugees.  UNDP, UNICEF, WHO, World Bank, EU, ASEAN countries and host countries could also chip in.

8.      UNHCR could strike deals as a Manpower Management Company and charge the employers, request rebates from the income tax departments and other levies charged by the employer countries. 

9.      UNHCR could even charge some fees from the refugees who become high-income earners. 

10. UNHCR could arrange with some international insurance companies for the refugees’ social security, future health and financial needs, and the education needs of their children.  They should be made to pay a portion of their monthly salary as instalments via a monthly deduction from their salary.  Their employers and the related governments should arrange for rebates, contributions or income tax exemptions e.t.c. into this fund.

11. UNHCR could arrange for or coordinate with some multinational companies and some host countries or neighbours of Burma/Myanmar to form joint venture industrial towns.  The local government’s investment would be land and some infrastructure necessities, UNHCR could manage the work force, and multinational companies could provide the financing and technology.

12. UNHCR could use this manpower pool for the UN’s various development projects around the world and for its HQ.  UNHCR could even use some suitable persons as security personnel in UN related offices and projects worldwide, and could recruit some of the suitable persons to help the UN peacekeepers around the world.

C.      UNHCR should guarantee that_

1.        Those refugee workers who hold the UNHCR Certificate of Identity Card (PP) would be working only on normal temporary contract basis.

2.        If there are any problems, UNHCR must take the undertaking to repatriate the workers, to the UNCHR controlled camps near the Burmese border.

3.        Promise that there are no obligations on the host countries to accept these workers permanently as citizens.

4.        If a refugee finished his contract with an unblemished record, UNHCR could search a job for him in other countries or temporarily repatriate him to the UNHCR camps at the border.

5.        If a refugee committed any crime, or has a disciplinary problem, he should be blacklisted and may be permanently sent back to the UNHCR camps at the Burmese border. 

6.        If UNHCR could guarantee that kind of undertaking or repatriation only, many countries would dare to issue work visas to the refugees. 

7.        To repatriate the sailors, there are fixed airfares from anywhere back to the country of origin.  UNHCR could negotiate that kind of repatriation fares.

It is the time to reform and revamp UNHCR. Even if it is difficult to issue the Certificate of Identity in lieu of International Passports (C of I or PP) to all the Burmese refugees, UNHCR must persuade OIC member Muslim countries with the help of Malaysian Government and UNSG’s office to start to accept Myanmar Refugees.

.

Read this author’s other articles.

Comments:

Aung Zaw said _

Its is really nice and constructive for the sake of humanity. The UNHCR would do everything for the welfare of refugees, rather than doing for a single group.

Actually, Dr. Volker Turk is not only a professonalist but also a racist on refugee issues.

Dr. Volker Turk created a conflict among the refugee communities in Malaysia as he closed registration for all nationals on May 15, 2007 but hiddenly registered more than 3000 Chin Christians.

In my opinion, all the staff of the UNHCR in Kuala Lumpur would change as early as possible. Because they are directly or indirectly involved in corruption.

On behalf of all Burmese non-Chin appeal to the International community to form an immediate investigation team for UNHCR office in Kuala Lumpur, in order to find a permanent solution for every one, rather than marginalizing with temporary stay permit that is not fall under the UN Convention.

Maung Soe said _

Volker Turk is destroying our national solidarity among the Burmese refugee community. So, we call upon the International Community to form an international investigation team to find out the reality of corruption and discrimination that has been exercising in the UNHCR local office in Kuala Lumpur under the patronization of criminal Volker Turk. I also strongly support the writer and commenter in this regards for the sake of humanity.
I also want to say the contributors to write more about stateless Muslims from Burma to find a permanent solution.

Myanmar Refugee/Migrant pilot Project Proposal I


Proposal to set up

 Myanmar Refugee/Migrant pilot Project

as A test case to settle  I

 

 

 

 

Contents

 

  1. Summary

  2. Diaspora

  3. Traditional ineffective process

  4. Analysis of problems arising from present system

  5. Almost impossible to improve Burma/Myanmar’s political situation

  6. Our proposal

  7. Possible benefits to all parties

 

.

 

A.  Summary

 

 

To solve the Burmese/Myanmar refugee problem, and illegal or undocumented labour problem, as well as to solve similar refugee problems around the world, UNHCR, UN and Host Governments should look at this problem from an out-of-the-box, unorthodox angle.

 

  1. Request UNHCR to issue Certificate of Identity in lieu of International Passports for all refugees all over the world, and in particular, to start this pilot project with Burmese Refugees and Burmese illegal immigrants without much differentiation or discrimination whether they are political or economic migrants.

  2. UNHCR should open vocational training and language training centres according to the demand for manpower.

  3. UNHCR should form a manpower training, management and supply company and negotiate with multinational companies and countries around the world to which to ultimately export this trained manpower.

 

 

 

B.  Diaspora 

 

This is the recently popularised word describing the phenomenon of dispersal of people, to describe the basic process, pattern, cause and effects of migrations of people. 

 

The dispersed people may be categorised as follows: 

 

1.      Professional and investor migration

 

2.      Documented labour migration

 

3.      Refugees and asylum seekers

 

4.      Undocumented or illegal immigrants

 

5.      Various economic migrants 

 

According to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, “a refugee is a person, who owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality, and is unable to or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country”.  

 

However, none of Burma’s immediate neighbours are parties to the (1951 Refugee) Convention, nor have they ever officially recognized the refugees.  

 

In addition, this definition even fails to include the internally displaced persons. 

 

It is very difficult to clearly differentiate the real refugees from the so-called economic migrants.  There is a very thin and faint line between these two categories.  

 

With the present situation in Burma, we have to think whether we really can or need to clearly differentiate them.  We should consider and see this from a holistic viewpoint, not only in Burma but also in other countries where similar widespread socio-economic problems originated in political conditions which are difficult to resolve.  

 

 

C.  Traditional INEFFECTIVE process

 

1.      Asylum seekers are put into refugee camps that are managed by host governments and UNHCR.

 

2.     After a long wait for the interviews and some investigations, the refugees are issued with Refugee certificates.

3.    The authorities search for third countries in which to send and settle the refugees.  These countries are only willing to accept a limit ed number of refugees. 

 

4.      In cases where the present refugees entered illegally, request the host country to convert them into a legal work force.

 

5.      Repatriate or re-settle refugees back int o their country of origin, after prolonged negotiations or after the conflict has been controlled.  Continuously support and monitor their conditions there. 

 

(a) These measures help part of the problems but are very slow and time-consuming, which result in  frustration and anger from the refugees as well as from the host countries. 

 

        We should not forget that the Palestinians are still in the UNHCR camps after 50 long years and although UNHCR had to spend a lot of money, the condition of the refugees in those camps is deplorable.  Burmese refugee camps near the Thai-Burma and Bangladesh-Burma borders are in worse conditions and refugees are not happy with their status. 

(b)   UNHCR is slow to accept, register, interview and process applicants for settlement in third countries. 

 

(c)   Host countries are reluctant to allow the UNHCR protected persons to stay and work freely in their countries before resettlement in a third country, for the following reasons: 

 

i.                     They fear that those UNHCR card-holders would permanently stay in the host country.

 

ii.                   Thei r citizens, especially the Labour Unions, are against allowing the illegals or refugees to work in their country.  They would not be able to compete with the refugees who are willing to do 3D jobs with low salaries. 

 

(d)   In Malaysia, Thailand and Burma’s western neighbour countries, UNHCR has stopped new registrations at the present time.  

 

(e)   Without the UNHCR Card, Malaysian government enforcement agencies refuse to recognize the refugee status of the refugees and arrest them as illegal immigrants.  Presently, the Malaysian government accepts the UNHCR Cards but they could change their acceptance criteria later, once UNHCR freely issues them without follow-up programmes to quickly resettle the refugees in third countries.  The Dilemma now is that the Malaysian authorities are willing to accept UNHCR registration but UNHCR has stopped all new registrations.  UNHCR seems to have problems getting third countries that are willing to accept refugees and grant them full rights. 

 

(f)    There are about one million refugees, asylum seekers and illegal workers in

 

        Burma’s neighbouring countries and elsewhere:

 

·        In Malaysia, 15,000 Rohingyas, 5,000 Chins and 20,000 Burmese Muslims

 

·        In Thailand, 400,000 Shans, Mons, and Karens

 

·        In Bangladesh, 120,000 – 220,000 Rohingyas and other races

 

·        In India, 50,000 Chins and other races

 

·        There are a lot of illegal immigrants from Burma around the world, e.g. Japan, Korea, Taiwan, USA, Australia, Europe and also in the abovementioned neighbours. Host governments do not seem very eager to settle the refugee problems so that they could continue putting pressure on the origin or source country.  Arabs seem to keep the Palestinians as refugees to put pressure on Israel and to leverage world opinion.  (This is only my personal view and even if it is right, there  are many people who agree with that idea.)

 

 

        Ethnic and religious links seem to play little or no part in the negotiations when considering the re-settlement of Burmese refugees.   Refugees like the Burma’s Shans in Thailand (who are known as Thai Yai, meaning Big T hai) are likewise cold-shouldered by the hosts.  Thais do not wish to keep their ethnically similar Buddhist brothers, Shans, Mons and Karens. (There are Buddhist and Christian Karens.)  Some historians have commented that Thais seem to have a hidden agenda in keeping their cousins, some of whom are rebels, as a buffer against their strong Burmese enemy.  This has been going on for few centuries. 

 

        Chins in India are related to the Mizorams and Rohingyas (who are closely related to Chittagonians) in Bangladesh, and Burmese Muslims in Malaysia also are facing the same problems with their ethnic and religious “brothers”. 

 

(g)   Because of all these problems, it was no wonder that at the meeting organized  among Altsean-Burma, Burma Border Consortium, Burma Issues, Forum Asia, Jesuit Refugee Service and Non-Violence International, which coincided with the visit to Pang Tractor refugee camp in Maehongson by Rev Jesse Jackson, the scathing remarks of Sunai Phasuk from The Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (better known as Forum Asia) were made: 

 

“UN High Commissioner on Refugees is doing little to protect its charges.”  

 

Dr Mark Tamthai of Thailand’s National Security Council (NSC) supported Sunai Phasuk’s attack. 

 

        Ms Kirsten Young from the UNHCR’s Bangkok regional office lamely replied that “refugee protection is mainly state responsibility.”  

 

 

D.       analysis of Problems arising from the pr esent system 

 

1.     UNHCR has to take time for the interviews and to undertake investigations to certify that the person is a real refugee or a person of concern.  It is not easy to differentiate the real refugees from economic migrants.  As almost the whole population of Burma is suffering under the cruel, autocratic Junta, we hope it is not necessary to differentiate between these two categories because the line between them is very thin.  If we do away with this differentiation, the resettlement process will be faster.  We all know that it would open the floodgates and tremendously increase the exodus of the people from Burma.  I will give my views and answer later in this proposal. 

 

2.     UNHCR has to search for a third party/country which is willing to accept asylum seekers as full-fledged refugees with all the rights including their welfare and citizenship etc. 

 

3.     Host countries are not happy if UNHCR just issues a lot of certificates but fail to follow up with quick repatriation of all the refugees to a third country.  They are worried that those UNHCR recognized refugees would stay on indefinitely in their country and they would ultimately have to accept their offspring and descendents as their citizens.  Before that, there may also be a lot of social, political, economic problems arising from the refugees.  To highlight a few: competing in the labour market with locals, intermarriage with locals, burden on locals’ health, housing, and infrastructure, and some increase in criminal activities. 

 

4.    4.   Refugees are not happy with the almost endless delays for each and every step of the above process.  They are angry and frustrated with the constant “harassments” of raids, detention, deportation and terrible conditions in the various detention centres.  Not only are the living conditions bad, there is no proper planning for language and vocational training there.  There is not much hope for their children’s future education and development.  

5.     Refugees accepting re-settlement in third countries have limited fund allocations and face an almost strict quota of accepted persons. In democracies,  host countries have to consider the sensitivities of their voters. 

 

We all know that the above facts prove that we have to change the present status quo.  Then we have to think about ways to improve the socio-economic changes in Burma/Myanmar or consider a “Regime Change”.  This is also not practical and an almost impossible task in the near future.  We would like to explain this in the following section.

 

 

E.        Almost impossible to improve Burma/Myanmar’S POLITICAL SITUATION 

 

First of all, we have to accept that we cannot do anything to improve the political conditions in Burma.

 

  1. No country is willing to wage a war for a “REGIME CHANGE” in Burma/Myanmar.  If not for the 9-11 tragedy and the bad experience of expensive, bitter, and protracted rebellions in Iraq, there would be hope for more aggressive action by the US in Burma.

 

  1. China India and ASEAN countries, especially Thailand are not only on the J unta’s side but are also protecting them from the West’s economic sanctions and political attacks.

  1.  
    • We still remember the days after the 1967 anti-Chinese riots and the killing of thousands of Chinese in Yangon.  Communist China gave full support to the Burmese Communist Party.  There were rumours, surely over-exaggerated, that 100,000 Red Army soldiers “deserte d” the Chinese Army, wore the new Wa rebel uniforms, and joined the Burma Communist compatriots. They failed to dislodge the Junta.

 

  1.  
    • India’s few decades of support to the pro-democracy forces also failed.

 

  1.  
    • It was reported in the Burmese newspapers that Burma’s last democratically elected Prime Minister U Nu had decided to return to Burma after abandoning his Government in exile in Thailand.  The Burmese newspapers alleged that the neighbour’s Deputy Defence Minister offered full financial and military support if U Nu agreed to allow Shan State to join their country after independence.  This may be also have been a lie to drum up the nationalist spirit of Burmans to support the unpopular Military government.

 

Important Note: we are not revealing or repeating the above rumours and unfounded allegations to accuse any country, nor do we even wish to know the truth.  (Some of us may even wish for this kind of external help nowadays.)  We only wish to prove that even under these adverse conditions, there was no successful regime change.  Further, with the present reversal of conditions of switching supports by all Burma’s neighbours, it is almost impossible to topple the Junta.

 

  1. The Burmese people’s popular uprising on 8th. August 1988, famously dubbed the 8888 movement, and subsequent election victory of NLD also could not do more than dent the international image of the Junta.

 

  1. ASEAN’s constructive engagement, USA and EU led economic sanctions, and UN Secretary General Kofi Anan’s representative Tan Sri Razali Ismail’s attempts also failed badly.

 

  1. Even if NLD got the chance to f orm a government and democracy prevails, the Ethnic Minority and minority Religions would continue to suffer the discriminations of their Big Brother, the Burman Buddhists.

 

  1. Even if all transferring of power could be smooth and rapid, it would take at least a generation to change the habits and mindsets of the government and private sector employees, and to rebuild the economic infrastructure to be on par with that of the developing neighbours’.

    7,   Myanmar’s crippling economy and stifled demands for political and economic reforms will fuel more racial violence in the near future.  The Military government may incite racial and religious hatred in order to take advantage and profit from the riots.  Both sides will promote this with their own agendas.  The Government will try to divert the attention of the people’s hatred and anger directed to them.  They need a scapegoat for their economic and political failures.  It will succeed as this divide-and-rule policy is a well-tested and effective policy. In addition, it will also show all the minorities that the government is their protector.  At the same time, the government can prove that they were needed to unite the country and for the maintenance of internal peace.  The bogeyman is needed to drum up support for them and all the people are coerced to unite behind the Military leaders. The anti-migrant policy, anti-foreigner policy, foreign threats, Communists and western countries’ imperialist plots, and danger of racial and religious riots, are used effectively and successfully by numerous dictators all over the world.

 

  1. Most of the governments around the world never try to understand the very reasons many Burmese Citizens of all races and religions wish to leave their country in the first instance.  To state a few:

 

·        Racial and religious discriminatory policies that suck the life out of minority ethnic and religious groups, sometimes amounting to ethnic cleansings.  

 

·        Cruel and lawless Military dictators’ oppressive and ever changing unjust laws, created according to their whims and fancies. 

 

·        The lopsided military-appointed eunuch judiciary who is always loyal and obedient to the Military rulers.

 

      Widespread corruption, abuse of power and absence of accountability at each and every level of the government machinery.

 

 

·        The police also ignore the rule of law but rule by the law, ordered by their army masters.

 

 

·        Dozens of local armed militia groups signed peace treaty with the army, and the still active Ethnic Minority rebels at the Burma borders are also crushing the people from other side.

 

 

·        There may be not an obvious war but there are internal conflicts or rebellions as well as a lot of internally displaced persons in Burma.

 

 

·        Numerous restrictions on the people’s daily life, travel, investments, trade, monetary policy, transport of goods, import/export, religion, education, etc. are pushing the people to their limits. 

 

 

9.            As long as there is no respect for the RIGHTS OF ETHNIC MINORITIES AND DISCRIMINATIONS against the minority religions, there is no hope of stopping people leaving Myanmar.  Mary Robinson, High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002) wrote: “… today’s human rights violations are the causes of tomorrow’s conflicts.”

 


On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples a nd all nations.

 

 On the 50th Anniversary of this Declaration, UN Security General Kofi Annan said:   

 

   “Human Rights are foreign to no culture and native to all Nations.  It is a mirror that at once flatters us and shames us, that bears witness to a record of progress for parts of humanity while revealing a history and reality of horrors for others.” 

 

“It was never the people who complained of the universality of human rights, nor did the people consider human rights as a Western or Northern imposition.  It was often their leaders who did so.”           

 

After looking at the above quotations, real conditions in Burma/Myanmar and the people’s plight, we do not need to give any further evidence to convince the reader that there are a lot of problems going on in Burma/Myanmar that are almost impossible to solve or change, and no one can prevent the people’s flight out of the country.

 

         SHWE BA (To be continued next week)

Appeal letter to the US President and EU leaders

Appeal letter to the

US President and EU leaders

 

To the US President and EU leaders,                                 

Thank you all for supporting the democratization of Burma. Any UNSC resolution would be vetoed by the Russians and Chinese, by giving the excuse that they do not feel Burma, as a threat in the region and UNSC is not the proper forum or place to discuss Burma/Myanmar issue. As they are holding the veto power, there is no use to argue or reason with them any more.  So instead of initiating a renewed attack at UNSC, where there are these two stubborn governments, who are not going to think twice to perpetrate the same atrocities even on their own citizens, are always willing to shield Myanmar Junta.

Yes, we need to tell Russia and China that they were right in stating that the UNSC is not the proper stage to discuss Myanmar issue. Therefore, we all need to request them to support the new resolution of UNSC to submit or propose the (ICC) International Criminal Court to accept the complaints about the alleged accusations of attempted Genocide, Crimes against Humanity and Ethnic Cleansing cases to investigate, start a prosecution and prepare for trial proceedings.

Sir Winston Churchill once said, “We must fail forward to success. Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.” Yes we must use our falling heroes; Monks, Burmese and foreign citizens’ sacrifices effectively to bring down the unjust, cruel SPDC criminals at the ICC.

The former Superman actor Christopher Reeve also said, “I think a hero is an ordinary individual who finds strength to preserve and endure in spite of overwhelming obstactles.”

I strongly believe that there are more than enough evidences for the indictment of SPDC Generals with Genocide and Crimes against Humanity.

Depayin massacre alone could be enough for preliminary indictment. If combined with the atrocities in the ethnic minority areas and their religious persecutions, our indictments would strongly stand as the castle built on solid rock. SPDC Generals could not have any solid ground of defense and their defense would collapse like a hut built on quick sand.

If Russia and China are still opposing the above proposal, please kindly bring those Criminal SPDC Junta to the International Criminal Court for cold blooded killing of the Japanese photo-video Journalist.

The proof is already in the photographs and Video below. The whole SPDC from the Senior General Than Shwe to the soldier who had done the shooting are all equally guilty of this killing. The  two serial, composite, extraordinary still pictures and video, attached at the end of this letter, from Rangoon, the Burmese capital, appear to show the cold blooded killing of a Japanese photographer cum video journalist, during the regime’s crackdown against pro-democracy protesters.

The first image shows a prone photographer – apparently injured – taking pictures of fleeing protesters as government troops approach. The SPDC soldier stands over him, pointing a gun at his chest although he was no threat to anyone, except for his camera, the pictures could show the proof of atrocities committed by SPDC soldiers. Myanmar soldier could easily grab the camera instead of killing almost pointblank on the chest.

In the second image, apparently taken just moments later, the photographer lies flat on the floor, his mouth contorted in pain. The soldier has moved on, clearly after firing the fatal shot into the chest of the Japanese video-Journalist. The military have also fired into sections of the crowd in the city with semi-automatic weapons not only to disperse the demonstrations but to kill. SPDC wish to intimidate the people of Burma that they mean business when they are not merely threatening with the words when they order the shoot to kill policy.

soldier-pointed-rifle-to-fallen-jap.jpg

The first image shows a prone photographer – apparently injured – taking pictures of fleeing protesters as government troops approach. The SPDC soldier stands over him, pointing a gun at his chest.

soldier-walk-away-rifle-after-shooting-jap.jpg

In the second image, apparently taken just moments later, the photographer lies flat on the floor, his mouth contorted in pain. The soldier has moved on.

P.S.

This Youtube Video shows

Japanese journalist Kenji Nagai

‘being shot deliberately’

Loading… <!– coolplayer(‘Utube Jap killing’, ‘619360307’, ‘480’, ‘380’, ‘0’, ‘0’, ‘utf-8’, ”); //–>

This Youtube Video shows Japanese journalist Kenji Nagai

‘being shot deliberately’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUUQi1ooEAs&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Etimesonline%2Eco%2Euk%2Ftol%2Fnews%2Fworld%2Fasia%2Farticle2550369%2Eece

Times online http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article2550369.ece

Footage capturing the last, terrible seconds of Kenji Nagai’s life has been aired on Japanese television – horrifying a nation and raising official suspicion that the 50-year old photo-journalist was murdered by Burmese troops (writes Leo Lewis in Tokyo).

The shaky, indistinct moments of footage appear to show Nagai, who was on the edge of a crowd of panic-stricken demonstrators, shoved violently to the ground by a soldier and shot dead at point-blank range.

The crowd flees, leaving behind a visibly agonised figure believed to be Nagai – dressed casually in shorts and flip-flops – on his back in the street. In his right hand is a video camera, held above the ground to protect it from the fall.

A loud crack is audible as a soldier points his rifle at the prone figure before launching himself at the dispersing crowd of protesters.

A doctor at the Japanese embassy in Burma confirmed a bullet entered Nagai’s body from the lower right side of his chest, pierced his heart and exited from his back.

The footage, say Japanese experts, squarely contradicts the official Burmese explanation of Nagai’s death – that he was killed by a “stray bullet”.

In the few seconds before he was killed, Nagai appeared to being filming the Burmese military as it faced down the crowd. One of the soldiers seems to spot him doing so, and launches his deadly response.

Yasuo Fukuda, Japan’s Prime Minister, said that Tokyo would press the regime for a full explanation of Nagai’s death, nonetheless ruling out immediate sanctions against Burma.

Earlier, the Foreign Minister, Masahiko Komura said that the footage appeared to show that Nagai was slain deliberately by Burmese troops as they charged on a crowd of civilians. The government is to dispatch the deputy foreign minister to Burma to establish the truth behind Nagai’s death.

Japanese media are hailing Nagai as a heroic crusader for the truth. His elderly mother, who made a brief, tearful statement this afternoon, said that she begged her son not to go to Burma, but Nagai had simply told her that it was his job to go to places nobody else wanted to. “I wept through the night as I thought about my son,” she said, “his job always made me prepared for the worst, but every time he went away my heart would beat fast.”

Nagai’s father said that if his son had indeed been shot dead at point blank range, it was the cruelest way to die.

Japanese television stations today showed a montage of Nagai’s work – mostly video taken during conflicts in the Middle East. His photo-journalism focused heavily on the victims of any conflict he covered.

The largest foreign donor of overseas development aid to Burma, Japan has officially said it will not cut off aid to the military-run nation. But foreign ministry sources today told The Times that its multi-million dollar donations to the country were now under review.

In Rangoon today several thousand protesters took to the streets once more in defiance of the soldiers and riot police, who sealed off much of the city centre with barbed wire barricades.

Soldiers were stationed inside and outside five large monasteries whose monks had previously led the protests, and today none were allowed to emerge.

The protesters tried to make the best of the absence of much revered monks from the protests. “The monks have done their job and now we must carry on with the movement,” one told a crowd.

About 20 truckloads of soldiers broke up a demonstration of 2,000 civilians near the Sule Pagoda, beating them with clubs and firing into the air. Smaller protests in other areas turned into a dangerous cat-and-mouse game in the side streets.

One Western diplomat said: “There have been massive arrests, certainly in the hundreds. The death toll is certainly higher now.”

Bob Davis, the Australian Ambassador to Burma, said that the number of dead was probably “several multiples” more than the ten officially acknowledged by the Burmese authorities.

Gordon Brown, the British Prime Minister, called for an end to the violence and said he too was speaking to Wen Jiabao, the Chinese Prime Minister and President Bush about the crisis.

“I condemn the violence that has been used against the unarmed Burmese protesters who have been exercising, with great bravery, their right to peaceful protest,” Mr Brown said in a statement.

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It has confirmed the identity of the dead man as Kenji Nagai, 50, from Tokyo. Nagai, a video journalist, worked for APF News Inc. based in Tokyo, which produces video news programs by freelance journalists, according to the company. Nagai was hit, along with other several people, by bullets fired by security forces while he was filming.

Video Shows Japanese Journalist Shot at Close Range in Burma

By VOA News
29 September 2007http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-09-28-voa53.cfm

This series of photos released by the Democratic Voice of Burma shows the sequence of events of Kenji Nagai's death on the street in Rangoon
This series of photos released by the Democratic Voice of Burma shows the sequence of events of Kenji Nagai’s death on the street in Rangoon

Japanese television is airing a video that shows a Burmese soldier firing at a Japanese journalist during Thursday’s pro-democracy protests in Rangoon.

Pictures broadcast by the Fuji television network show a soldier pointing his rifle and shooting from close range. Japanese video journalist Kenji Nagai was thrown to the ground, apparently shot in the chest. Later photographs of the scene indicate the 50-year-old man died there a short time later.

Burmese authorities originally said the Japanese victim was hit by a stray bullet. However, analysts who studied the video obtained by the Japanese network, from the Democratic Voice of Burma say the pictures squarely contradict the official version of events.

Japan’s authorities have sent a senior diplomat to Burma to press for a full explanation of Nagai’s death.

The pictures seen in Japan also have been posted on the Internet on youtube.

They show Burmese soldiers chasing protesters on Thursday near Rangoon’s Sule Pagoda. Nagai, who had been filming the scene at the edge of the crowd, is suddenly thrown to the ground from a sidewalk at the sound of a bang. Lying on his back, apparently wounded and unable to get up, the journalist moves his arms up and down, still gripping a video camera in his hand, while a soldier points a rifle at him at point-blank range.

Nagai worked for the Japanese photo and video agency APF.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

18 Responses to “Appeal letter to International Leaders”

  1. edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 1:16 am1Dr San Oo Aung

    Please read this article http://burmadigest.info/2007/09/28/bravo-lets-march-forward/

    Excerpt

    As far as I know, real soldiers always wear boots on duty. I had even seen the various diseases of the feet of soldiers who never take off their boots, day and night, for almost six months. They rightly said that during the operations in the jungles, any type of emergency could come out; they do not want to be caught with bare foot.
    The “soldier” who shot Kenji Nagai was curiously wearing the slippers. May be there is some truth in the repeated rumors that SPDC officers trained the convicted criminals to shoot the rifles (or semi-automatic machine guns) and given the stimulants like Amphetamines or Ecstasy pills to commit the atrocities like killing the monks and civilians. There are also repetitive reports that the SPDC soldiers are given the same stimulants like Amphetamines or Ecstasy pills to commit raping of ethnic minorities. I think this is the first time our world had witness a regular government soldier without boots. If that is true, the one who ordered or give the command would be more guilty then the actual perpetrators. This is a very important point to remind our prosecutors at ICC.

  2. edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 1:22 am2Dr San Oo Aung

    Please read the following article to understand the proceedings of ICC
    http://www.tayzathuria.org.uk/bd/2007/2/25/e/soa.htm

    Excerpt _

    Crime against humanity

    For the purpose of this Statute, “crime against humanity” means any of the following acts when committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack:

    (a) Murder;

    (b) Extermination;

    (c) Enslavement;

    (d) Deportation or forcible transfer of population;

    (e) Imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law;

    (f) Torture;

    (g) Rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity;

    (h) Persecution against any identifiable group or collectivity on political, racial, national, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender as defined in paragraph 3, or other grounds that are universally recognized as impermissible under international law, in connection with any act referred to in this paragraph or any crime within the jurisdiction of the Court;

    (i) Enforced disappearance of persons;

    (j) The crime of apartheid;

    (k) Other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or to mental or physical health.

    According to the Commentary on the Rome Statute:

    Isolated inhumane acts of this nature may constitute grave infringements of human rights, or depending on the circumstances, war crimes, but may fall short of meriting the stigma attaching to the category of crimes under discussion.

    On the other hand_

    (a) an individual may be guilty of crimes against humanity

    (b) even if he perpetrates one or two of the offences mentioned above, or

    (c) engages in one such offence against only a few civilians,

    (d) provided those offences are part of a consistent pattern of misbehavior by a number of persons linked to that offender (for example, because they engage in armed action on the same side or because they are parties to a common plan or for any similar reason.)

    (e) Consequently when one or more individuals are not accused of planning or carrying out a policy of inhumanity, but simply of perpetrating specific atrocities or vicious acts, in order to determine whether the necessary threshold is met one should use the following test:

    (f) one ought to look at these atrocities or acts in their context and

    (g) verify whether they may be regarded as part of an overall policy or

    (h) a consistent pattern of an inhumanity, or whether they instead constitute isolated or

    (i) sporadic acts of cruelty and wickedness.

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 1:27 am3Dr San Oo Aung

    At least four journalists arrested in Rangoon, including Japanese daily’s correspondent by Reporters Without Borders

    http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=23837

    Reporters Without Borders and the Burma Media Association call for the immediate release of Min Zaw, the Burmese correspondent of the Japanese daily Tokyo Shimbun, and three young Burmese journalists, who are apparently being held incommunicado by the security forces. Their arrests bring the number of journalists detained in Burma to 10. At least a thousand people have been arrested since demonstrations began a month ago.

    “One reporter killed, five others arrested and about 10 injured or harassed – the toll from the media’s attempts to cover the pro-democracy demonstrations mounts by the day,” the two organisations said. “The international community most do something to stop the repression and must demand the unconditional release of the detained civilians.”

    The Japanese deputy minister who is due to arrive in Burma to investigate the murder of Japanese video reporter Kenji Nagai must also intervene with the authorities to get Min Zaw released as soon as possible, Reporters Without Borders and the BMA added.

    Min Zaw, 56, was arrested at his Rangoon home on 28 September. The Associated Press reported that the authorities confiscated his mobile phone but let him take his medicine for diabetes and high blood pressure with him to prison. His family said all he did was cover the pro-democracy demonstrations. According to the AP, he is the son-in-law of leading journalist Sein Win, who is the correspondent of the Japanese agency Kyodo and a former AP reporter.

    The Foreign Correspondents Club of Myanmar, of which Min Zaw is a member, yesterday called for his release in a letter to the authorities. Several other correspondents of foreign news media, including Reuters and Agence France-Presse, have been physically attacked or prevented from working during the past month.

    The news website Irrawaddy reported that three other Burmese journalists – Kyaw Zeya Tun, 23, who works for the newspaper The Voice, Nay Lin Aung, 20, who works for the weekly 7 Day News, and an as yet unidentified female journalist employed by Weekly Eleven News – have been missing for several days. It is believed they were arrested when the military dispersed demonstrations.

    A colleague of Kyaw Zeya Tun confirmed to Reporters Without Borders and the BMA that he has disappeared.

    According to Burmese human rights organisations, at least a thousand people have been arrested since 19 August, the date of the first demonstration.

    Reporters Without Borders and the BMA have learned from local sources that military censorship department, known as the Press Scrutiny and Registration Division, is harassing editors to get them to bring out issues of their newspapers and magazines containing propaganda articles. Most privately-owned Burmese publication have not appeared or have been closed since the start of the crackdown.

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 1:40 am4Dr San Oo Aung

    Appeal to the Japanese government and Japanese and Singapore people
    Min Zaw, the Burmese correspondent of the Japanese daily Tokyo Shimbun,
    Please do not just take action for your own blood Japanese journalist killed by SPDC Junta.
    Please demand SPDC to release correspondent of the Japanese daily Tokyo Shimbun, Min Zaw.
    Japanese government must give asylum to the whole family of Min Zaw. You can use this Burmese speaking journalist in other countries, e.g. ASEAN, where Burmese migrant workers are regularly exploited by local police, immigration and volunteer thugs in some countries.
    Although we are sorry for the death Japanese, at least you have the courage. See the Singaporean was hit by the LIFE BULLET. Coward, greedy, Singapore government announced shamelessly that a Singaporean was hit by the RUBBER BULLET.
    If they are right, accept my apology. But I suspected that SPDC NEVER use Rubber Bullet! Shame on you Singapore Kaisu Government. Singapore people must teach a lesson to their government if the bullet is proved not to be a rubber.

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 1:47 am5Dr San Oo Aung

    Appeal to UN, US and Singapore law enforcement officers

    Depayin Massacre Myanmar PM General Soe Win is in death bed in Singapore. May be He could understand his mistakes, crime and want to ask for forgiveness if he repented. He would be prevented by Burmese guards.

    Please remove the Myanmar Guards and talk to him.
    We could get the BEST EVIDENCE of the Depayin Massacre to try SPDC Junta, esp Sr Gen Than Shwe.

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 2:29 am6Dr San Oo Aung

    Appeal to Chinese President Hu Jintao
    Dear Sir,
    Japanese Photographer Kenji Nagai was killed because the SPDC soldier thought he was a CHINESE. If he knew that that was Japanese he would not dare to shoot and kill.
    So if you continue to support SPDC who never care your overseas Chinese, it is up to you. Please read the Wikipedia, Burmese Chinese if you want to know about the Massacre of Burmese Chinese at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burmese_Chinese by the first Military Dictator, General Ne Win

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 12:17 pm7Dr San Oo Aung

    Burmese opposition esp NLD must promise and guarantee the safety of all the SPDC Generals, soldiers, USDA, Swan Arrshin and their families.

    U Kyi Maung’s speech of sending Military Generals esp General Khin Nyunt to Nuremberg had made the Generals scared to death and refused any negotiation.

    Daw Aung San Suu Kyi also failed to convinced the Generals. She said that she could forgive and forget but to take action on the perpetrators of atrocities, it is up to the victims and Burmese people. In stead of those words, she should give very strong guarantee by saying that if anyone wants to revenge the Myanmar Tatmadaw Generals and personals, she would personally defend. Even should use the words, over her dead body.

    Now, if the SPDC Junta refuse the demands of UN, US, EU and Burmese opposition, they should be threatened with the ICC. But if they give in and start a reconciliatory process and allow Daw Suu led NLD and opposition, UN, US, EU and all the opposition should guarantee the safety of Myanmar Tatmadaw and SPDC Generals.

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 12:22 pm8Dr San Oo Aung

    Please read the views of Former Prime Minister of Malaysia Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad’s views;
    BURMA DIGEST: Do you see any sign of possible changes in Burma in a near future?
    Dr Mahathir…Burma is of course not a democratic country and is ruled by the Military Junta. When that happens, it is very difficult to change because the Junta will feel unsafe if they give up power, actions could be taken against them.
    This has happened in the case of Bangladesh when Ershad giveup power. He was jailed.
    It had happened in South Korea when Chun Doo-hwan gave in to the democratic process, he was charged and he was actually sentenced to death.
    And it also happened in Indonesia when Suharto agreed to the democratic process. Action had been taken to try and punish or to jail him.
    So these models do not encourage authoratian rulers from giving up their power easily. So it is going to be very difficult to change the political culture of Myanmar/Burma.
    Read the hole interview at http://www.tayzathuria.org.uk/bd/2006/11/12/soa.htm

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 3:18 pm9Dr San Oo Aung

    When I mention of the granting carpet amnesty and formation of Interim government together, some of my shortsighted comrades are angry and even accused me as SPDC admirer. They pointed about the sufferings of activists who sacrificed their lives, jailed, tortured, wounded, crippled, lost jobs etc.

    I just pointed out to them that if they are powerful enough and could overthrow SPDC by force, go ahead. Now we are powerless, weak and we are not in any position to impose our will on SPDC by force. If we want them to transfer the power peacefully, we must negotiate and guarantee their safety.

    And what is the use of hanging or punishing the dethroned dictators if we ignored the sacrificed activist. Just see Iraq. We must try to forget the incidence and give up the attempt to punish them even if we could not forgive the perpetrators.

    Like the no fault compensation in some insurance schemes, the State of Burma/Myanmar should compensate all the sufferers, with lump some rewards, monthly pensions, giving employment, projects, land, shop-lots, interest free loans etc.

    Then only it will be a win-win situation for all of us, including SPDC and Tatmadaw. After all we could not disband the 400,000 strong Myanmar Tatmadaw. Just look at what happens in Iraq. Not only the jobless ex-military could give trouble, our country’s security would be compromised. We need them to protect us from foreign aggressors and hard-line separatists to prevent the total disintegration of Burma/Myanmar.

  • edit this on 01 Oct 2007 at 3:26 pm10Dr San Oo Aung

    Just the coincidence or quick reaction after reading my FIFTH COMMENT, SPDC urgently brought back PM General Soe Win. Read the following report from Mizzima_

    Ailing Prime Minister to go back to Burma, Rangoon commander ousted

    October 1, 2007 – Soe Win, the ailing Prime Minister of Burma may fly back to the country from Singapore this afternoon, sources said.

    Lieutenant General Soe Win’s special flight will land in Rangoon at about 5 p.m.

    “His condition is not good and he will die soon. He will be taken to the military hospital in Mingaladon,” sources close to the military said.

    The Prime Minister, who is a Senior General Than Shwe loyalist, is notorious and had executed the Deepayin ambush on Aung San Suu Kyi, leader of the National League for Democracy, now under house arrest on May 2003.

    ” (Lieutenant General) Thein Sein will replace Soe Win when he dies and Tin Aung Myint Oo will replace Thein Sein as Secretary-I,” the sources added.

    Source http://www.mizzima.com/MizzimaNews/News/2007/Oct/Oct-1-2007.html

  • edit this on 02 Oct 2007 at 3:33 pm11Dr San Oo Aung

    To President Hu Jintao,

    China used to protect Myanmar at the UNSC with the veto, claiming that it does not want to interfere in the internal affairs of other countries. But actually this protecting of the criminal SPDC with veto is actually against the majority (more than 80% according to the last election) of Burmese population’s interest. Because of this, Chinese Embassies around the world were protested.
    Please change your policy of protecting or shielding the criminal SPDC at UNSC and international arena. If not, we are going to increase our campaign to boycott Chinese Olympics, support Taiwan Independence, Tibet’s struggle, Yunan Chinese Muslims, Turkic peoples of Xinjiang (Sin-kiang, Uyghur, East Turkestan or Urghurstan) Muslims, Kazakhs Hui Muslims, Kyrgyz Muslims, Uzbek Muslims, Tajik Muslims, Mongolian liberation and Falun Gong Buddhists’ freedom of religion.
    Regarding the Beijing Olympics_
    Forced evictions have increased as Beijing clears entire neighborhoods to make room for Olympic sites and to beautify the city. An official with the Beijing Municipal Administration of State Land, Resources and Housing has indicated that some 300,000 people are scheduled for relocation to accommodate beautification projects alone. With courts offering little protection, residents have banded together to protest collusion between developers and local officials who forcibly evict them from their homes or sell off the land they have been farming. Residents rarely win, in part because land is not individually owned. In mid-September, Beijing municipal authorities shut down over 50 unregistered schools for children of migrant workers, leaving tens of thousands of children without access to education. This followed a discussion by the authorities about ways to expel one-million migrant laborers from Beijing.
    Please read more about Chinese government’s atrocities on its own citizens at http://www.tayzathuria.org.uk/bd/2007/1/21/mhbdl.htm

  • edit this on 02 Oct 2007 at 3:42 pm12Dr San Oo Aung

    China has more influence over Myanmar’s ruling generals than any other country. Indeed, without Chinese support, it is debatable whether the regime could sustain itself. So, while the current crisis is not of China’s making, any peaceful settlement may be possible only if China acts to support it.
    China is thus facing an unwanted test of its claim to be a responsible stakeholder in the international community. With 3,000 villages destroyed and 1.5 million people already displaced in eastern Myanmar, a humanitarian disaster has been unfolding for some time now. Throughout these troubles, China has held its tongue, sticking to its policy of non-interference in the internal affairs of any nation.

    But that policy may no longer be tenable, because it is in China’s interest to find an effective alternative to a brutal crackdown, which would only remind the world vividly of the massacres in Yangon in 1988 and in Tiananmen Square the following year.
    With some international celebrities already keen to start a campaign to boycott the Beijing Olympics because of China’s support for some of the world’s most repressive and incompetent regimes, a military crackdown in Myanmar is the last thing the Chinese authorities can afford.
    Moreover, China’s rulers are focused on the looming 17th Congress of the Communist Party, which could likewise be spoiled by a bloody confrontation in Myanmar.

    Yet China may be able to pre-empt such an outcome by making the option of a brutal crackdown prohibitively high to the Myanmar regime.
    Read more http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/NST/Tuesday/Columns/20071002072320/Article/index_html

  • edit this on 02 Oct 2007 at 3:49 pm13Dr San Oo Aung

    Amnesty calls for arms embargo on Myanmar

    BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) – Amnesty International on Monday urged the U.N. Security Council to impose a mandatory arms embargo on Myanmar, and urged the country’s main arms suppliers _ China and India _ to suspend all deals.

    “It is unacceptable for states to continue to supply arms to a government that is already responsible for persistent serious violations of human rights and which now resorts to violence against peaceful demonstrators,” Khan was quoted as saying.

    The U.N. embargo should remain in place until the junta takes real steps to improve the human rights situation, the statement said.

    Amnesty also called on the principal suppliers of arms to Myanmar, particularly China and India, in addition to Russia, Serbia, Ukraine and Southeast Asian nations, to stop arms deals with Myanmar.

    Since 1988, Amnesty said, China has supplied Myanmar’s army with a range of military equipment. India is also reported to have agreed to supply military equipment to Myanmar, Amnesty said.

    Read more http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2007/10/1/apworld/20071001184941&sec=apworld

  • edit this on 02 Oct 2007 at 4:02 pm14Dr San Oo Aung

    To President Putin, “with love”_

    Russia is protecting Myanmar with veto ast UNSC because they are actually scared as they know that what the Myanmar Tatmadaw is doing on the ethnic minorities are same as what they are doing on their own ethnic minorities like Chechens, their own citizens, their political dissidents and the neighbouring countries. And the Russians know that they had killed jailed and tortured more of their citizens than in Myanmar. Myanmar Tatmadaw’s atrocities pale when compare to the atrocities of their red army. Russians had also committed unrecorded atrocities on the people of Poland and Czechoslovakia. So Russians are scared that the Myanmar case became a test case or precedent to punish the Russians for the similar atrocities they are committing.
    Recently Kremlin critic and former spy Alexander Litvinenko was killed by poisoning with the polonium-210. Alexander Litvinenko accused that Russia President Vladimir V. Putin was behind his poisoning.
    Ukranian President Victor Yushchenko was poisoned by the massive dose of dioxin while he was campaigning as a Candidate for the Presidency. He accused the Ukranian government of poisoning him in order to knock him out of the presidential race. Yushchenko stated that he believed he received came from a dinner he ate with Ukraine’s security chief three months ago. The ultimate origin of dioxin is believed to be Russia. Tests revealed that Yushchenko’s blood contained 6,000 times the normal concentration of dioxin.
    According to the Reporters sans frontières – Reporters Without Borders , “through the use of powerful state companies, the government is pursuing its take-over of the nation-wide independent media belonging to the “oligarchs” of the news sector. There is no freedom of information in Chechnya, and pressure is increasing on journalists in the various republics of the Russian Federation. Journalist Grigory Pasko is back in jail.”
    Mikhail Khodorkovsky was once Russia’s richest man and the head of the Yukos oil company. The company’s assets had been took over under the state control. Khodorkovsky was unfairly convicted of fraud and tax evasion and sentenced to nine years in a labor camp just because he supported the opposition.
    According to the recent Human Rights Watch report 2007_
    The murder of Novaya Gazeta journalist Anna Politkovskaia in October 2006 symbolized the further deterioration of the human rights situation in Russia. Anna Politkovskaia was known for her independent reporting, particularly about abuses committed in the war in Chechnya, Politkovskaia was a fierce critic of the Kremlin and the pro-Russian Chechen government.
    In The Northern Caucasus Local human rights groups reported as many as 5,000 people ‘disappeared’ since 1999 and at least 54 so far in 2006. Reports of torture, especially in unofficial detention centers run by the ‘Kadyrovtsy’ increased in 2006.
    The Russian government failed to pursue any accountability process for human rights abuses committed during the course of the conflict in Chechnya. Hundreds of victims of abuse have filed applications with the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). The court issued landmark rulings on Chechnya, finding the Russian government guilty of violating the right to life and the prohibition of torture with respect to civilians who had died or been forcibly disappeared at the hands of Russia?s federal troops. Hundreds of similar claims are pending before the court.
    Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), activists, and independent journalists working on human rights issues, particularly the war in Chechnya, faced increasing administrative and judicial harassment. In some cases, these individuals also endured persecution, threats, and physical attacks.

    In November 2005 authorities in Dagestan held Osman Boliev, a human rights defender who investigated kidnapping and other abuses by police. He was tortured in custody and later acquitted and released. Boliev fled Russia in July 2006 when police charged him again with aiding the terrorists.
    In January President Vladimir V. Putin signed into law new regulations that impose burdensome reporting requirements on all NGOs and grant registration officials unprecedented authority to interfere with or restrict the work of NGOs. President Vladimir V. Putin is acting like Senior General Than Shwe of Myanmar SPDC.
    On June 17, 2006, it was reported that Russian special forces killed Abdul Khalim Saidullayev in a raid in a Chechen town Argun. According to The New York Times, Russian television channels showed gruesome images of a body that appeared to be Saidullayev, and a Web site linked to the Chechen rebels, the Kavkaz Center, confirmed his death and declared him a martyr. The successor of Saidullayev became Doku Umarov. On July 10, 2006, the FSB announced that agents had killed Basayev and up to 12 Chechen separatists in Ingushetia by detonating a truck bomb near cars carrying the separatists.
    Russia is selling weapons, arms, ammunitions and nuclear technology to Myanmar Government. Russia is helping Uranium mining, extracting and Uranium enrichment programmes. Russia is also helping Myanmar to build the nuclear reactors. Many Burmese people including students and monks are oppressed; maimed and killed using those bastards-communists’ weapons.
    Read more http://www.tayzathuria.org.uk/bd/2007/1/21/sb.htm

  • edit this on 02 Oct 2007 at 4:13 pm15Dr San Oo Aung

    To the ASEAN leaders,
    Please kindly read the following news articles and change your previous stand of shielding Myanmar every where.

    1. Razali: Belief in constructive engagement was an illusion
    KUALA LUMPUR: The belief that constructive engagement with Myanmar was working was an illusion, said former UN Envoy to Myanmar Tan Sri Razali Ismail.

    “Many people knew that the constructive engagement was not constructive because there was very little engagement.

    “Only the Foreign Ministers (of Asean) insisted that the constructive engagement was working.

    “It is an illusion they placed before their eyes and the Prime Minister (Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi) has burst the bubble of delusion,” Razali said when contacted yesterday.
    Read more http://burmadigest.info/2007/09/30/razali-belief-in-constructive-engagement-was-an-illusion/

    2. Malaysia PM: Asean’s constructive engagement with junta has failedNEW YORK: The crackdown on protests in Myanmar shows that Asean’s constructive engagement with the military government of that country has failed, Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi says.

    “It has been the formula used when we deal with Myanmar but up to this stage, it has not been successful although it has been many years already,” the Prime Minister said.

    He acknowledged that Thursday’s statement from Asean (Association of South-East Asian Nations), which expressed revulsion over the violent force used against the demonstrators, was unprecedented because of its bluntness. Read more http://burmadigest.info/2007/09/30/malaysia-pm-aseans-constructive-engagement-with-junta-has-failed/

  • edit this on 02 Oct 2007 at 4:16 pm16Dr San Oo Aung

    According to William Shakespeare –
    “The evil that men do lives after them…”
    (Julius Caesar III ii.75).

  • edit this on 03 Oct 2007 at 12:18 pm17Dr San Oo Aung

    Please read back my comment No 5 at 01 Oct 2007 at 1:47 am_

    Depayin Massacre Myanmar PM General Soe Win is in death bed in Singapore. May be He could understand his mistakes, crime and want to ask for forgiveness if he repented. He would be prevented by Burmese guards. Please remove the Myanmar Guards and talk to him.
    We could get the BEST EVIDENCE of the Depayin Massacre to try SPDC Junta, esp Sr Gen Than Shwe.

    And my comment No 10 at 01 Oct 2007 at 3:26 pm_
    Just the coincidence or quick reaction after reading my FIFTH COMMENT, SPDC urgently brought back PM General Soe Win.

    Today there is the report of his death in Mizzima dated October 02, 2007 http://mizzima.com/MizzimaNews/News/2007/Oct/today-demonstration.html
    Burmese Prime Minister pass away
    Burma’s ailing Prime Minister Lt-Gen Soe Win has died at the military hospital in Mingalardon, Rangoon on Tuesday, sources said.
    Soe Win, who returned to Burma on Monday from a secret medical treatment in Singapore, died at about 5:00 p.m (local time), sources added.
    The Burmese Prime Minister is known to have been suffering from Leukemia and had secretly received medical treatment in Singapore.
    Soe Win, who is a Senior General Than Shwe loyalist, is also known as “the Butcher of Depayin” for orchestrating the Depayin massacre in 2003 by ordering mobs to attack on pro-democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s motorcade.

    May be just the coincidence because of my goodluck or

    May be it was a quick reaction after reading my 5th COMMENT, SPDC urgently brought back PM General Soe Win, and after talking to him as he was really repented and wish to ask forgiveness. If that theory is true, SPDC has no choice but forced to shut his mouth. If not the whole SPDC would be hauled to ICC as criminals. Only god will know the truth.

    But when his medical condition was a top secret, I may have just a curious premonition of his death. But anyway, we lost the best opportunity to prove the Depayin Massacre.

  • edit this on 03 Oct 2007 at 12:38 pm18Dr San Oo Aung

    There is a saying_
    Man propose, God dispose meaning; if man proposes evil, God disposes of it.
    [c 1420 T. À Kempis De Imitatione Christi I. xix.] The Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs. Oxford University Press, 2004.
    SPDC and Senior General Than Shwe (proposes) promoted General Soe Win to the post of Prime Minister of Myanmar, after the Depayin Massacre.
    But tragically, God disposed him with the Leukaemia.
    SPDC Junta Generals should get enlightenment from this incidence.