Happy Merdeka, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, Please use your liberty to promote ours and freedom of Daw Suu

  

 Happy Merdeka, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad 

Please use your liberty to promote ours and freedom of Daw Suutugu_negara8_001

  

Merdeka means Independence but we Burmese and especially I have the pleasant memories once we heard the word Merdeka. We even had a “Pavlov” like reaction when we hear this word Merdeka.

Malaysia PM YAB Datuk Sri Najib: “Abolish NEP”

Malaysia PM YAB Datuk Sri Najib said: “Abolish NEP”

On his maiden trip to Singapore yesterday, Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak was on a charm offensive, touching on his plan to dismantle the National Economic Policy (NEP), a sore contention point in Malaysia’s race-relations.

najib in pattaya thailand asean summit 10409In an interview with Singapore’s Straits Times, Najib (right) said that the ethnic quotas had damaged Malaysia’s competitiveness and ran counter to global trends.

He added that the long-term benefits of ending the scheme would outweigh the “pain”.

 

Launched in 1970, the NEP has remained one of the most divisive aspects of Malaysia’s multi-ethnic society. The affirmative action programme uniquely favours the Malay majority over the Chinese and Indian minorities.

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Tun Dr M should advise the new PM YAB Najib to abandon the shameful Islam Had Hari

Tun Dr M should advise the new PM YAB Najib

to abandon the shameful Islam Had Hari

Just read the following interview published in the Mizzama on line magazine with the exiled umbrella orgnization ‘National Council of Union of Burma’ (NCUB) Joint General Secretary (1) Myint Thein. Surprisingly these two Buddhists organizations and persons’ views on Rohingyas are much better than the inhumane and un-Islamic  Islam Had Hari leader. Tun Dr M should advise the new PM YAB Najib to abandon the shameful Islam Had Hari from Malaysia as we should not continue to practice that kind of Islam in Malaysia.

“Humanism is more important than the term ‘Rohingya’: NCUB”, Interview for Mizzima by Ko Wild on Wednesday, 11 February 2009 with exiled umbrella orgnization ‘National Council of Union of Burma’ (NCUB) Joint General Secretary (1) Myint Thein.

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ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE 

WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

 

ASEAN leaders are complaining about the convenient way to solve the Rohingya problem.

But for the Rohingyas or Burmese Muslims or Christian Chins/Karens/Kachins and Buddhist Mons/Shans/Burmese etc AND the NLDS  and political opponents and armed rebel groups_

Whether the SPDC would accept them back is not their main concern. What is the consequences after repatriation is their only problem.

Jailed? Tortured? Is the main concern for all but ‘Village arrest’ (for Rohingyas only) is the problem.

No democracy, no Human Rights, no political life, no respect for the Rights of religious minorities and Ethnic minorities is their main concern.

But the lack of development, economic problems back home are the most important fact for all of them.

There is no clear cut line to DEFINE OR CATEGORIZE THEM INTO POLITICAL OR ECONOMIC MIGRANTS. 

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Bollywood drama in Boleh land, waiting for DSAI’s Hindi songs for soothing

Bollywood drama in Boleh land,

waiting for DSAI’s Hindi songs for soothing

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 1 — When the bushfire of Indian dissatisfaction in the PKR threatened to turn into an inferno, party supremo Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim, holidaying in the Middle East, called from Dubai and urged a man he trusted to investigate what was really going on, how big it was and why it was happening…..

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M’sia offers to help minority Malays in other countries BUT IGNORED THE MUSLIMS OF OTHER RACES EVEN INSIDE THEIR COUNTRY

M’sia offers to help minority Malays in other countries

BUT IGNORED THE MUSLIMS OF OTHER RACES

EVEN INSIDE THEIR COUNTRY

COMMENT: Malaysian government used to ignore the Myanmar/Burmese Muslim migrants in their country.

Red tape and toll gates managed by ‘Little Napoleons’ everywhere

This is against the Islamic teaching and the UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS CONCEPT.

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Solidarity Day with migrants

Solidarity Day with migrants

Posted on December 19th, 2008 by Nathaniel Tan

The Star:

ABOUT 1,300 illegal foreigners have died during detention in the past six years, Malaysia Nanban quoted Malaysian Human Rights (Suhakam) commissioner Datuk N. Siva Subramaniam as saying.

He said many of them died in immigration detention centres, prisons and police lockups because they were denied medical treatment at the right time.

He proposed that a doctor and a medical assistant be appointed in each detention camp and prison which should have the necessary facilities to transfer sick prisoners to hospitals during an emergency.

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STOP HATRED, STOP TRYING TO DIVIDE; FOR A LONG LASTING PEACE, PROGRESS, AND PROSPERITY

 

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If our national hero, Malaysia’s first astronaut charge US$200,000 (RM720,000)++ for a lecture, the hell (will) broke

If our national hero, Malaysia’s first astronaut

charge US$200,000 (RM720,000)++ for a lecture,

the hell (will) broke 

COMMENT: Our national hero, Malaysia’s first astronaut was investigated for few thousand MR he charged for the lectures. Pity him.

Former US President Bill Clinton visited Malaysia yesterday to deliver his first paid speech since his wife, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, was selected on Monday by US President-elect Barack Obama to be secretary of state.

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Prescription, dispensing, suffering (Pt 2)

Prescription, dispensing, suffering (Pt 2)

Product Of The System in Malaysiakini

Rules in any game should be fair and just and implemented on both parties.

  • If doctors are to be prohibited from dispensing,
  • shouldn’t pharmacists too be forbidden from diagnosing, examining, investigating and prescribing?
  • Yet this is exactly what takes place everyday in a typical pharmacy.

I have seen with my own eyes (not that I can see with someone else’s eyes anyway)

  • pharmacists giving a medical consultation,
  • performing a physical examination
  • and thereafter recommending medications to walk-in customers.

It is also not uncommon to find pharmacies collaborating with biochemical laboratories to conduct blood tests especially those in the form of seemingly value-for money ‘packages’. These would usually include a barrage of unnecessary tests comprising tumor markers, rheumatoid factor and thyroid function tests for an otherwise well and asymptomatic patient.

medical doctorsPharmacists intrude into the physicians’ territory when they begin to do all this and more. Doctors may occasionally make mistakes due to their supposedly inferior knowledge of drugs despite the fact that they are trained in clinical pharmacology.

In the same vein, pharmacists may have studied the basic features of disease entities and clinical biochemistry but they are nonetheless not of sufficient competency to diagnose, examine, investigate and treat patients. Pharmacists are not adequately trained to take a complete and thorough medical history or to recognise the subtle clinical signs so imperative in the art of differential diagnosis.

In more ways than one and increasingly so, pharmacists are overtaking the role of a clinical doctor. Patients have reported buying antibiotics and prescription drugs over the pharmacy counter without prior consultation with a physician.

If the MOH is sincere to reduce adverse pharmacological reactions due to supposedly inept medical doctors, then it should also clamp down on pharmacists playing doctor everyday in their pharmaceutical premises.

Patients will receive better healthcare services only when each team member abides by and operate within their jurisdiction.

The move to restrict doctors to prescribing only while conveniently ignoring the shortcomings and excesses among the pharmacy profession is biased and favors the pharmacists’ interests.

Root problem is quality

A significant issue in Malaysian healthcare is that of the quality of our medical personnel. This includes doctors, dentists, nurses and pharmacists, therapists, amongst others. A substantial number of our doctors are locally-trained and educated. If current trends are extrapolated to the future, the number of local medical graduates is bound to rise exponentially alongside the unrestrained establishment of new medical schools.

The quality and competency of current and future medical graduates produced locally is an imperative point to consider. Competent doctors with a sound knowledge of pharmacology will go a long way in improving patient care and minimising incidence of adverse drug reactions. The very fact that the MOH resorts to the drastic step in prohibiting doctors from dispensing medications indicates that it must be aware of the high prevalence of drug-related clinical errors.

Much of patient safety revolves around the competency of Malaysian doctors in making the right diagnosis and prescribing the right medications. Retracting dispensing rights from clinicians therefore, will not solve the underlying problem. Our doctors might still be issuing the right medications but for the wrong diagnosis. In the end, a dispensing pharmacists will still end up supplying the patient with a medication of the right dosage, right frequency but for the wrong indication.

medical doctors in malaysia 120106Patient safety therefore begins with the production of competent medical graduates. The problem lies in the fact the same universities producing medical doctors are usually the same institutions producing pharmacists. It is really not surprising, since the basic sciences of both disciplines are quite similar. Therefore, if the doctors produced by our local institutions are apparently not up to par, can we expect the pharmacy graduates who learnt under the same teachers to be much better in their own right?

Among other remedial measures, my personal opinion is that the medical syllabus of our local universities is in desperate need for a radical review. There is a pressing need for a greater emphasis on basic and clinical pharmacology. At the same time, the excessive weightage accorded to para-clinical subjects like public health and behavioral medicine need to be trimmed down to its rightful size. Lastly, genuine meritocracy in terms of student intake, as opposed to ‘meritocracy in the Malaysian mould’, will drastically improve the final products of our local institutions.

MOH’s own backyard needs cleaning

Healthcare provision in Malaysia has undergone radical waves of change during the Chua Soi Lek era. The most sweeping changes seem to affect the private sector much more than anything else. The Private Healthcare Facilities and Services Act typifies MOH’s obsession with regulating private medical practice as though all doctors are under MOH’s ownership and leash.

An analyst new to Malaysian healthcare might be forgiven for having the impression that the Malaysian Ministry of Health is currently on a witch hunt in order to make private practice unappealing and unfeasible in order to reduce the number of government doctors resigning from the civil service.

Regardless of MOH’s genuine motives, it must be borne in mind that private healthcare facilities only serve an estimated twenty percent of the total patient load in the whole country. The major provider of affordable healthcare is still the Ministry of Health and probably always will be.

Targeting private healthcare providers therefore, will only create changes in a small portion of the population. Overhauling the public healthcare services conversely, will improve the lot of the remaining eighty percent of the population.

medicine health pills and tablets and capsulesAt present, the healthcare services provided by the Malaysian Ministry of Health are admittedly among the most accessible in the world. The quality of MOH’s services however, leaves much to be desired. Instead of conceiving ways and means to make the private sector increasingly unappealing to the frustrated government doctor, the MOH needs to plug the brain drain by making the ministry a more rewarding organisation to work in.

The MOH needs to clean up its own messy backyard first before encroaching into the private practitioners’.

The prescribing-dispensing issue should hardly be MOH’s priority at the moment. I can effortlessly think of a list of issues for the MOH to tackle apart from retracting the right of clinicians to dispense drugs.

Private laboratories are conducting endless unnecessary tests upon patients and usually at high financial cost despite their so-called ‘attractive’ packages. In the process, patients are parting with their hard-earned money for investigations that bring little benefit to their overall well- being.

Mildly ‘abnormal’ results with little clinical significance result in undue anxiety to patients. More often than not, such tests will result in further unnecessary investigations. The MOH needs to regulate the activities of these increasingly brazen and devious laboratories.

Potentially lethal procedures

Medical assistants trained and produced by the MOH’s own grounds are running loose and roaming into territories that are far beyond their expertise. It is not uncommon to find patients who were on long-term follow up under a medical assistant for supposedly minor ailments like refractory gastritis and chronic sorethroat.

A few patients with such symptoms turned up having advanced cancer of the stomach and esophagus instead. The medical assistants – who for years were treating them with antacids and multiple courses of antibiotics – failed to notice the warning signs and red flags of an occult malignancy.

They were not trained in the art of diagnosis and clinical examination but were performing the tasks and duties of a doctor. There is no doubt that the role of the medical assistant is indispensable in the MOH. Just as a surgeon would not interfere with the role of an oncologist, medical assistants too must be aware of the limits of their expertise. MOH will do well to remember the case of the medical assistant caught running a fully-fledged surgical clinic in Shah Alam in late 2006.

refugees in malaysia 130207 medicalAdulterated drugs with genuine risks of lethal effects are paddled openly at roadside stalls and night markets. They are extremely popular among folks from all strata of society who rarely admit to the use of such toxins to their physicians. It is possible and highly probable that many unexplained deaths taking place each day are in some way related to the rampant use of such preparations.

Non-medical personnel are performing risky and potentially lethal procedures daily without the fear of being nabbed by the authorities. These are mostly aesthetic procedures. Mole removals, botulinum toxin injections and even blepharoplasty are carried out brazenly by unskilled personnel and usually in the least sterile conditions.

It makes a mockery of the plastic surgeon’s years of training but above all, proves that the MOH is indeed barking up the wrong tree in its obsession to retract the dispensing privileges of medical practitioners.

Get priorities right

In summary, a patient’s health is affected by many factors – a doctor’s aptitude is merely one step in a torrent of events. The health seeking behavior of patients play an imperative role in the final outcome of one’s own health.

Most harm to patients can only occur as a result of unidentified minor errors in the management flowchart of a patient. If allowed to accumulate, such errors converge as a snowball that threatens the long term outcome of an ill person.

There are a multitude of other clinical errors apart from prescribing and dispensing, some of which are not at all committed by trained medical staff. The MOH must get its priorities right by first overhauling an increasingly overloaded public healthcare service.

Lastly, the difference between a drug and a poison is the dose. A toxin used in the right amount for the right condition is an elixir. A medication used in the wrong dosage and for the wrong indication is lethal poison.


 

PRODUCT OF THE SYSTEM is the pseudonym of a doctor in government service.

Deafening silence from Malaysia regarding Myanmar Cyclone?

Deafening silence from Malaysia regarding Myanmar Cyclone?

 

First of all I wish to apologize if I am wrong.

 

If Malaysian Government had already sent the condolence note to Myanmar, I am sorry for writing this.

 

If Malaysian Government, GLCs (government Linked companies), NST, TV3, NTV7, RTM and NGOs (esp. government affiliated) had already started a campaign to help Myanmar, please accept my  apology for wrongly writing this posting.

 

If you all haven’t done anything, it is shame on you.

 

We don’t want a cent from you Kaisu Malaysia!

 

 

We know that we are not Orang Puteh (Whiteman) , no Arab blood and have no Malay-Indonesian blood. We are ALWAYS discriminated in your country.

 

Never mind if you do not wish to recognize the undocumented workers/migrants and asylum seekers.

 

During the great disaster in Myanmar, I hope if Malaysian government could do the followings to help us without spending a cent.

 

Please announce amnesty on all the Myanmar/Burmese undocumented workers/migrants and asylum seekers including those already in the detention camp. (At least if they could work and earn, they could help their families, relatives and friends.)

 

You could put a time limit for example six months to one year.

It is shameful that you are heartless to continue arresting and some of your agents are harassing them daily.

 

Dr San Oo Aung

 

17 Myanmar Illegal Immigrants Held In Kelantan

BERNAMA, RANTAU PANJANG, May 6 (Bernama) — The Anti- Smuggling Unit (UPP) Tuesday arrested 17 Myanmar nationals without valid travel documents in Kampung Kempas, Machang, as they were being smuggled into the country by a syndicate.

Kelantan UPP commander Mazlan Che Hamid said the Myanmar nationals, aged between 16 and 30 years, had been turned over to the Immigration authorities.

He said the van driver, a Malaysian, stopped the vehicle by the roadside and fled after realising that it was being tailed by UPP personnel at 4.30 am.

The UPP personnel had followed the van from Kampung Kedap here, some 40 km from Machang, he said.

— BERNAMA

Torch the Beijing Olympics

Torch the Beijing Olympics

Extracts from Manjit Bhatia’s article in the Malaysiakini

MANJIT BHATIA, an academician and writer, is also research director of AsiaRisk, a political, economic and risk analysis consultancy in Australia. He specialises in international economics and politics, with a focus on the Asia-Pacific.

I just saw an advertisement for Visa on television featuring Jackie Chan.


Now that he’s been plugging the Beijing Olympics, starting in August, one wonders if Chan sanctions_

  • Beijing’s barbaric annexation and colonisation of Tibet,
  • including the brutality that Chinese security forces have been routinely meting out to pro-independence Tibetans.
  • Is Chan saying Chinese barbarism in Tibet is justified?
     
  • a loony form of Chinese patriotism,
  • one that exemplifies China’s loony provincialism mentality. 
The Hu regime, on April 18, instructed its official mouthpiece, Xinhua, to issue an edict. In its editorial, approved by the Communist Party’s politburo, Xinhua extolled the virtues of Chinese patriotism, suggesting that it should be “cherished hundred-fold” whilst harnessing “rationally” in the pursuit of “sound and fast development”.
 
This is Chinese hyperbole at its ridiculous sloganeering best. Beijing is nervous. It fears that the recent state-organised Chinese street protests against criticism by the West of the regime’s barbaric attacks on Tibetan human rights, could turn on the regime. After all, only small number of Chinese, including the political elite, controls the bulk of national wealth. If ordinary Chinese should turn against the regime’s economic and political excesses, bloody mayhem is not imponderable. Recall Tiananmen Square in June 1989, and its bloody crackdown.
 
To many Chinese, Tibetan lives are pointless and worthless, much in the way that the lives of guest workers in many countries are treated.

Nervous Beijing
 
Despite its growing global presence, China deliberately spawns_

Taking Tibet in the name of ‘recapturing’ an old Chinese sovereignty and settling it with Chinese citizens has parallels elsewhere. Beijing’s brutalising persecution and murder of Chinese Muslims and the Falun Gong (Buddhists) approximate Nazi Germany’s of the Jews. 
  
The organised protests in China are Beijing’s attempts to counter protests during the torch relay run in several countries. China is desperate to save face after it is latest Tibetan odyssey – or misadventure. 

Purists argue that sports must not become entangled with politics. That’s as dumb as saying that religion and politics are mutually exclusive. Or that Tibet is nobody’s business but China’s. It’s every country’s business the way one country brutalises a weaker one.

If China gets away with murder_

  • it’s because of the collective hypocrisy of the West and Asia.
  • All have pervasive economic interests in China. 
  • Add, too, Asia’s conspicuous silence.
  • Such gutlessness is stunning.
  • It’s staggering and disgusting the way the Asians have kow-towed to China. 
  • It says plenty about India’s spineless foreign policy vis-à-vis China.
  • Similar displays of hypocrisy were exhibited in Thailand, Malaysia and Australia.

 

 
It’s precisely because of such despicable and entrenched hypocrisy among nation-states, including the pusillanimous attitude of the International Olympic Committee –  
It’s precisely because of such despicable and entrenched hypocrisy among nation-states, including the pusillanimous attitude of the International Olympic Committee

 

  • all devoid of morality and sensibility –
  • that Beijing will host the Olympic Games. Clearly, it does not deserve the privilege.

    The Beijing Olympics should be torched.

But powerful and greedy global and Chinese commercial interests, including the Chinese regime, will lord over human decency.

 

 

 

BBC Hard Talk with Dato Seri Syed Hamid Albar

BBC Hard Talk with Dato Seri Syed Hamid Albar

BBC Hard Talk before becoming an Anti_Foreigner Minister

Dato Seri Syed Hamid AlbarIn a HardTalk programme first broadcast on Thursday 13 September 2007, Sarah Montague talks to Malaysian Foreign Minister Dato Seri Syed Hamid Albar.

 

Malaysia has just marked fifty years of independence, and there’s much to celebrate.

Living standards have improved immeasurably over the past five decades, illiteracy has been virtually eradicated and the economy is doing well.

But do Indian and Chinese Malaysians have as much to celebrate as the Malay population?

Sarah Montague talks to Dato Seri Syed Hamid Albar about whether the law giving preferential treatment to Malay and other indigenous groups is now outdated.

 

HARDtalk can be seen on BBC World at 03:30h GMT (not Asia), 08:30h GMT, 14:30h GMT, 20:30h GMT, 23:30h GMT (not Asia)

It can also be seen on BBC News 24 at 0430 and 2330.

The true hero-warrior

The true hero-warrior

Notes or extracts from Malaysiakini’s letter of AM Keris, “The keris is not a symbol of political ideology”.

 

 

In the true sense of the word,

a warrior is a man/woman_

  • who has a clear and guiding moral code of honour
  • and is someone who serves others in the interests of social justice
  • and who normally stands up unfailingly for the cause of righteous justice,
  • fighting in a noble and measured way when required,
  • and doing so with wisdom and a tenacious quality of strength
  • that somehow is able to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles and odds.

 

Even when their cause appears lost or hopeless,

  • warriors rarely give up their cause,
  • persevering on with admirable courage,
  • even being prepared to lay down their lives
  • or to put it on the line for their cause,
  • which nearly always has something to do with serving and protecting others who are less able to do so from some human cruelty or injustice inflicted on them unjustly by what is termed as man’s inhumanity to man.

 

All true warriors_

  • have this innate noble quality of heroism
  • and that is why they often become inspirational role-models to emulate
  • and iconic heroes of the people.

 

The best example of a Malaysian warrior hero in this genre is, in my view, the legendary Hang Jebat,

  • who was a valiant pahlawan,
  • a warrior of exceptional skill with a keris
  • and in the art of hand-to-hand combat called silat,
  • and who under tragic circumstances, gave up his life for true friendship and loyalty
  • by first defending the honour
  • and then protecting the life of his beloved friend and fellow warrior, the equally legendary Hang Tuah.

 

So the keris (like a samurai’s or knight’s sword or a Jedi’s light sabre) is_

  • a reflective symbol of the noble warrior’s benchmark moral code of honour,
  • principled conduct and disciplined way of life
  • which enshrines highly revered human values and principles
  • which amongst others include the values of selfless service to others,
  • the seeking of life-long learning, knowledge and wisdom,
  • and the pursuit of excellence in all things attempted.

 

Ever heard of the law of physics which states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction?

Well from my vantage point, I see that law as a scientific ratification of the universal principle of natural law which states that in the final analysis at that proverbial end, one always reaps what one sows, no matter what.

 

And to quote some wise words from the famous Hang Jebat:

  • ‘Raja adil raja disembah;
  • raja zalim raja disanggah’

which literally means_

  • ‘A fair and just king/government is a king/ government to obey;
  • a cruel and unjust king/government is a king/government to fight against’.