ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

ASEAN LEADERS ARE BARKING AT THE WRONG TREE 

WITH THE WRONG CAUSE AND WRONG OBJECTIVE

 

ASEAN leaders are complaining about the convenient way to solve the Rohingya problem.

But for the Rohingyas or Burmese Muslims or Christian Chins/Karens/Kachins and Buddhist Mons/Shans/Burmese etc AND the NLDS  and political opponents and armed rebel groups_

Whether the SPDC would accept them back is not their main concern. What is the consequences after repatriation is their only problem.

Jailed? Tortured? Is the main concern for all but ‘Village arrest’ (for Rohingyas only) is the problem.

No democracy, no Human Rights, no political life, no respect for the Rights of religious minorities and Ethnic minorities is their main concern.

But the lack of development, economic problems back home are the most important fact for all of them.

There is no clear cut line to DEFINE OR CATEGORIZE THEM INTO POLITICAL OR ECONOMIC MIGRANTS. 

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M’sia offers to help minority Malays in other countries BUT IGNORED THE MUSLIMS OF OTHER RACES EVEN INSIDE THEIR COUNTRY

M’sia offers to help minority Malays in other countries

BUT IGNORED THE MUSLIMS OF OTHER RACES

EVEN INSIDE THEIR COUNTRY

COMMENT: Malaysian government used to ignore the Myanmar/Burmese Muslim migrants in their country.

Red tape and toll gates managed by ‘Little Napoleons’ everywhere

This is against the Islamic teaching and the UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS CONCEPT.

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Solidarity Day with migrants

Solidarity Day with migrants

Posted on December 19th, 2008 by Nathaniel Tan

The Star:

ABOUT 1,300 illegal foreigners have died during detention in the past six years, Malaysia Nanban quoted Malaysian Human Rights (Suhakam) commissioner Datuk N. Siva Subramaniam as saying.

He said many of them died in immigration detention centres, prisons and police lockups because they were denied medical treatment at the right time.

He proposed that a doctor and a medical assistant be appointed in each detention camp and prison which should have the necessary facilities to transfer sick prisoners to hospitals during an emergency.

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STOP HATRED, STOP TRYING TO DIVIDE; FOR A LONG LASTING PEACE, PROGRESS, AND PROSPERITY

 

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Eroding the racial divide

Eroding the racial divide

Insight Down South, Star on line
By SEAH CHIANG NEE

Deepening globalisation has generated an ‘us vs them mentality’, compelling the various races to come together and work things out.

FASTER than anything else, globalisation has eroded much of the historical racial divide in Singapore, especially between Chinese and Malays, without eliminating it.

Given its longstanding nature, this scourge is unlikely to disappear any time soon, but the next best thing is happening.

Deepening globalisation has brought in new challenges (as well as benefits) that are compelling the various races to come together to work things out, instead of bickering over petty racial issues.

One perceived threat from the people’s point of view is immigration.

While the large-scale arrival of foreigners – mainly from China and India – has contributed significantly to the overall economy, locals perceive it as a threat that cuts across racial lines.

The strongest resentment against the presence of Chinese mainlanders, for example, has not come from the Malays or Indians, but from local Chinese.

Similarly local-born Indians have hit out against the new arrivals from their former motherland.

Race issues have been replaced by a common feeling that the local population is slowly becoming a minority in its own country as an overwhelming number of foreigners arrives.

To a large extent, this has helped to bond them.

“Its an emotional thing. The foreigners have brought the different races closer together,” a social worker said.

“It’s sort of an us versus them mentality.”

When Singapore’s most dangerous terrorist Mas Selamat Kastari escaped from a high-security detention centre, a shocked nation sprung into action to set up an island-wide search.

Joining hordes of security forces were volunteers who spread across residential estates to distribute pamphlets with the picture of the wanted Jemaah Islamiah leader.

Many were Malays, as was the large number of security forces hunting for Mas Selamat.

“This man is a threat to us all because he wants to bomb us irrespective of whether we’re Chinese, Indian or Malay,” explained a middle-aged Malay housewife on television.

This is the latest evidence that race relations in Singapore, particularly between Chinese and Malays, have significantly changed from the violent 60s.

More Malays – like other Singaporeans – are marrying outside their race. Last year three in 10 Muslims did so, compared with only 20% in 1997.

And in a recent survey, 94% of ethnic Chinese undergrads said they would not mind an Indian for a Prime Minister, while 91% would accept a Malay Prime Minister.

This is Singapore’s new generation, born after independence in 1965.

They have no living memory of the deadly race riots of the 60s.

Racial bonding has also another ally – education.

Last week I saw seven teenage students, obviously classmates, two Malays, an Indian and three Chinese, noisily lunching at a fast-food outlet. They were laughing and joking, oblivious of their different backgrounds.

This is actually a normal scene in Singapore schools these days (which still celebrate Racial Harmony Day every year), so common that it arouses little interest.

To an old journalist like me, however, who has lived through the worst of times of Chinese-Malay riots, the whole thing is a minor miracle.

Singapore kids have lived, studied, worked and played together for over 40 years.

To ensure racial and educational immersion, the authorities long ago imposed a rule that forbids neighbourhood schools from catering exclusively to any one race, but makes sure of a proper mix.

The same, too, applies in public housing.

The units of each block of Housing Board flats are apportioned roughly 70% to the Chinese, 16% to Malays and 8% to Indians.

Despite the progress, racial issues still surface even among the best educated.

Three young bloggers were prosecuted for posting racial remarks against Malays.

Two of them were jailed for making seditious remarks and the third sentenced to do work within the Malay community.

This would help him “correct his misguided dislike for Malays”, the judge said.

A shocking eye-opener came last year from – of all people – a Public Service Commission (PSC) scholar studying in the United States, Chuan Chen San, who remarked in his blog: “The Singapore Association (in the campus) has become an Indian association, so gross. And some more (they’re) non-Singaporeans. It’s just so repulsive, these ugly guys with dark skin and irksome features.”

“I still find Indians and Filipinos (dark ones) so repulsive and such a turn-off. Anyway, so now we have this ugly mass as our president (etc).”

The only merit of the case was the universal condemnation by Singaporeans of Chuan, who was criticised in strong terms by almost every one.

More serious are complaints often voiced by Malays and Indians of job discrimination.

These minority job seekers are angry over employers who asked them during interviews if they were proficient in Chinese or whether they could speak Mandarin, even in jobs that require no special language needs.

Landlords, too, frequently display bias against dark-skinned tenants; many of the room-to-let advertisements blatantly rule out Indians.

The government has warned against such racial discrimination and may take action to stop it.

One person is not too optimistic about the possible emergence of a Singaporean identity that is free of racial, language, religious and cultural identities of its people.

The cynic is Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew, who understands racial problems here better than most.

He said: “The melting pot idea (of throwing in all the races and hoping one day to pull out one people) is idealistic, but not realistic.”

The Golden days of the Great Shan Empire VII

The Golden days of the

Great Shan Empire VII

Detention of Ethnic Shan and other opposition Leaders

Read detail in Irrawaddy, “Detained Ethnic Leaders Denied Outside Medical Aid” By Shah Paung on January 8, 2008

Detained ethnic Shan leaders are being denied medical treatment from outside for serious health problems, according to the Shan National League for Democracy.

9883-khun-htun-oo.gif

SNLD chairman Hkun Htun Oo

SNLD spokesman Sai Lek told The Irrawaddy on Tuesday that prison authorities had rejected or ignored requests by the families of SNLD chairman Hkun Htun Oo and SNLD member Sai Hla Aung for medical attention from outside.

Hkun Htun Oo suffers from_

  1. prostate problems,
  2. diabetes,
  3. heart disease
  4. and high blood pressure.

Sai Hla Aung has_

  1. a hyperthyroid condition,
  2. diabetes
  3. and heart disease.

They were arrested in February 2005, together with_

  1. SNLD General-Secretary Sai Nyunt Lwin,
  2. Shan State Peace Council President Maj-Gen Sao Hso Ten
  3. and Shan politician Shwe Ohn, who was later released.

They were arrested days before a resumed session of the National Convention opposed by Shan leaders.

  • Hkun Htun Oo was sentenced to 92 years imprisonment and is detained in Putao prison, Kachin State.
  • Sai Nyunt Lwin received a 75 year sentence and is in Kalay prison, Sagaing Division.
  • Sao Hso Ten was sentenced to a total of 106 years imprisonment and is in Hkamti prison, Sagaing Division.
  • Sai Hla Aung received a sentence of 75 years and is in Kyauk Pyu prison, Arakan State.
  • Meanwhile, arrests of National League for Democracy members continue. NLD spokesman Nyan Win said five members of the NLD youth wing had been arrested between Burma Independence Day on January 4 and January 6. No reason has yet been given for the arrests.
  • According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma), based in neighboring Thailand, there are more than 1,400 political prisoners in Burma.

SPDC Junta and Myanmar Tatmadaw failed to understand that patriotism is not the sole property of the Myanmar Tatmadaw and its Generals alone.

Each and every citizen_

  • regardless of his race,
  • religion,
  • social status
  • or political alignment,

has the right and is duty-bound to show his sense of patriotism to the country he loves in his own way.

Tatmadaw failed to acknowledge that the opposition parties like NLD, SNLD etc are equally patriotic, if not more so than SPDC leaders.

Many opposition leaders, to name a few_

  1. U Gambari lead real Buddhist monks,
  2. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi led NLD leaders like U Tin Oo,
  3. U Hkun Htun Oo led SNLD Shan leaders,
  4. Min Ko Naing lead 88 Student leaders, like Ko Ko Gyi etc,
  5. Burmese Muslims such as, Daw Win Mya Mya (NLD Mandalay, Panthay) and Ko Mya Aye (88 Student leader)

Are unlike those in the SPDC and Tatmadaw,

  • have given up much of their comforts in life,
  • endured so much pain and humiliation
  • and even have been detained
  • and tortured
  • under the illegal, undemocratic, unjust, draconian laws of the SPDC.

SPDC Junta should answer my question even if their brain is slightly larger than a bird’s brain.

If sacrificing the major part of one’s life for the nation is not patriotism, what is it then?

It is extremely distressing that the ruling Myanmar Generals and Tatmadaw want to cling onto power instead of being an instrument for the peace, progress, prosperity, unity of Myanmar and power house to start an inertia of change to democracy.

Not only the different Races and religions have become the cause of disunity, hate, violence and turmoil but the Myanmar Generals and Tatmadaw show the world that they are even willing to assault, arrest, torture and kill their own monks to stop the momentum of people’s peaceful struggle to initiate the changes to democracy.

So what’s left now to think about the safety or guarantee of other minority races and religious groups’ fate, life and property ?

We all now witnessed that Myanmar Tatmadaw is even willing to sacrifice and annihilate any one or any obstacle on their way to the road to their permanent dominance of Myanmar. 

But the whole world looks quite cool, slow and looks like willing to patiently waiting forever for the SPDC promised, “Rice presenting on the moon-plate”

SPDC Generals should stop playing the politics of fear and intimidation on the unarmed Myanmar civilians. They should not politicise or use the national security as an excuse because it would be the most unpatriotic act, amounting to treachery.

We have journeyed together, sharing a common brotherhood for 60 years and we have attained wisdom and maturity to effect change that would create an environment where all of the Burmese/Myanmar citizens can have our voices heard, rights respected and continue to live together without fear or suspicion of each other.

We should not allow selfish Military Generals to sow the seeds of disunity, suspicion, hate and jealousy that will only be detrimental to us in this multi-racial and multi-religious nation of Burma/Myanmar.

As Barrack Obama, the US presidential candidate, said after his first defeat in the primaries:

‘Change is hard. Change is always met by resistance from the status quo. The real gamble is to have the same old folks doing the same old things over and over and over again and somehow expect a different result’.

We cannot and should not expect a better outcome from the same old Tatmadaw system over and over again. They will try to keep all the issues and dialogue in the back burner.

In order to create a just government for all of the Burmese/ Myanmars, we must strive to effect a change.

We have no much time to wait for the evolution, until or unless, UN and Mr Gambari could forced the snail paced present (almost effectively stalled) dialogue on the rocket louncher to install on to the fast track.

To bring about that change may not be that easy, it may be a monumental task, but there must be a beginning for all good things to happen.

Why shouldn’t it be now?

Is the saying, “Time and Tide wait for no man” irrelevant to the inhumane, noncivilized uniformed Tatnadaw?

Why did UN and the whole world allow the Junta to procrastinate when all of us already know that what the SPDC want was TIME only.

SPDC stupidly thought that time could heal the bleeding hearts of the people seeing their beloved revered monks beaten, arrested and killed.

It is now in our hands to make that change.

Do we have the will and courage to do so?

Except for the USA and EU leaders,

  • are ASEAN leaders,
  • OIC leaders,
  • Common Wealth leaders,
  • Non Allied movement leaders
  • and UN member countries’ leaders

all became cowards? Eunuchs with any B–ls? Greedy Crooks?

Or are they all willing to close their eyes, as the Burmese saying, “Myauk Thar_ Sar Chin Yin_Myaul Myet Nher_Ma Kyi Ne’.” meaning. “if you want to eat the flesh of the monkey, avoid looking at the face of the monkey.”

So carry on world leaders, just close your eyes to avoid seeing us beatened, tortured, arrested and killed by the Than Shwe Junta.

Please continue to enjoy the following article I republished from Irrawaddy.

Pro-Democracy Political Prisoners in Poor Health Condition
By Shah Paung
January 16, 2008

At least four detained political prisoners in Burmese prisons are in poor health and need medical attention, according to their family members.

The four political prisoners are Hla Myo Naung and Kyaw Soe of the 88 Generation Students group, who are both in Insein Prison in Rangoon; Win Maw, a pro-democracy activist, also in Insein Prison; and Myint Oo, a committee member of the Magwe Division of the National League for Democracy, who is in Mandalay Prison.

Hla Myo Naung has eye problems and is nearly blind in both eyes, according to a family member. He has had eye problems since October 2007, and was arrested while he was enroute to a Rangoon clinic to have an operation on the left side of one eye.

After he was arrested, authorities performed an operation on one of his eyes, but it was not successful and an eye nerve was damaged.

Family members of both Win Maw and Kyaw Soe said they received medical treatment in prison after they were tortured by the authorities in an interrogation center.

However, Win Maw has now contracted pneumonia. Kyaw Soe suffers from fainting spells. Both men were victims of water torture, according to sources.

A family member of Win Maw said they have not been allowed to visit him for nearly three weeks.

Myint Oo, who also suffers from pneumonia, began receiving medical treatment in a Mandalay prison hospital three days ago, according to family members.

Tate Naing, the secretary of the exiled-based Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma), said that since August 2007, the military government has arrested more than 7,000 people, including pro-democracy activists.  Prisoners are not allowed to receive outside medical treatment.

88 Generation Students leaders Min Ko Naing and Ko Ko Gyi also have health problems, say their family members. They were arrested by authorities in August 2007.

According to the AAPP, there are more than 1,850 political prisoners in Burmese prisons.

 

Burmese Folk Tale, Puppet Master

Burmese Folk Tale,

Puppet Master

 

Once upon a time, that was a very long long time ago, in a beautiful prosperous country called Shwe Bama Paradise there was an old puppet maker name Ah Ba Aung.

He had a son named Mg Tat. As the name implies Mg Tat is megalomaniac and thought he knew every thing. So he decided to travel and work abroad to become rich. Father sadly gives him his favourite, precious four puppets,

  1. a Nat (Burmese version of guardian angel),
  2. a Be Loo (ogre),
  3. a Zaw Gyi
  4. and a holy monk.

Ah Ba Aung reminded Mg Tat to use his puppets wisely and explained him how to use them if he is in trouble.

On the first night of his journey, he was alone scared and out of curiosity but jokingly asked the Nat puppet whether it is safe to rest under the tree. The Nat suddenly came alive and advised him to survey and observe the surroundings first before sleep and he found out the foot prints of a tiger, climbed and sleep on the tree and was saved from the tiger which came again later.

The next day he saw a long caravan and he asked the Be Loo or Ogre how he could become rich immediately. Be Loo suddenly became alive and help Mg Tat to rob and take over the whole caravan. Be Loo taught him a lesson that “The Might is right and it is nothing wrong if he could take anything with force.”

He found Shwe Bama princess on a carriage and fall in love at first sight. Princess told him that she is the daughter of deposed King Lu Du and she was traveling with all their belongings on the way to join back her father.

Mg Tat, with the help and advice of the Be Loo took the princess by force against her will.

Mg Tat was confused and did not know what to do with the new found wealth and asked the advice of the Zaw Gyi. As Zaw Gyi was wise, powerful, know the science, weather, ground condition, could even fly, dive into the earth, he could give the detailed map of fertile soil and precious metal deposits to Mg Tat. Mg Tat became very rich in a very short time.

Mg Tat tried in every possible way to get the love of the princess but failed every time. One day the princess managed to escape from Mg Tat. Be Loo and Zaw Gyi could not give any help. Then only he remembered about the two puppets he forgot, the Nat he used once and the Monk he never asked for help.

Then only the two of them taught him that Power and Wealth only, never brings happiness.

Physical possession of the body with the Might could not get the Love and Loving Kindness.

The True Happiness comes only from pure heart and Good-deeds.

What one possessed is not important but how you utilize that possession is more important.

They reminded his father, Ah Ba Aung’s wise advice to use all four of the puppets wisely. As he was only using the Might of the Ogre and Wisdom of the Zaw Gyi and forgot to control those two with the Wisdom of the Nat and Goodness of the Holy Monk he was on the wrong track.

Might and power brought wealth but wealth brought in misery only. True happiness came from good deeds only.

Those two good puppets changed the life of Mg Tat. He does a lot of good deeds, donations and accidentally met the poor princess and her father, poor deposed King Lu Du. He apologized both of them, asked for forgiveness, give back the poor King all his belongings. He wanted to go back to his old village but the King immediately recognized his virtues and talent, offered him a job as his most trusted right hand man and offered him to continue to stay in the ‘palace’ he returned back.

Mg Tat gladly accepted to work for the deposed King, and later even won the trust of not only the king,  but of the princess and at last even won over her heart. They were legally married, Mg Tat became Ein Shei Min or Regent and at last the king of whole Shwe Bama country. And they happily lived ever after.

Zat paung khan (Epilogue):

Shwe Bama Paradise is Union of Burma.

Old wise puppet maker name Ah Ba Aung is our father General Aung San.

His son Mg Tat is the Myanmar Tat Madaw.

The Nat is Maha Bandula on special mission ordered by General Aung San to take care of his son, Tatmadaw. He advised me to keep quite like ‘The Royal drum which made the sound only if strike. The wise man, who only answered when asked for advice’ so I give this best advice at last at a crucial time only. I let Mg Tat or the Myanmar Tatmadaw alone to do what they like for a long time giving enough periods to learn its own lesson.

Ogre or Be Loo is not alone, represents three persons viz: General Ne Win, General Saw Maung and Senior General Than Shwe.

Zaw Gyi also represents: Russia, North Korea and Pakistan giving Nuclear Know-how, Thailand, China and India supporting economically and militarily.

Tiger represented foreign colonies including Fascist Japan.

Shwe Bama princess represented our beloved Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.

Looting or robbing of the caravan is the Coup.

King Lu Du represents Lu Du or all the people of Burma/Myanmar.

Holy man Monk represent, Sayadaw U Gambira led demonstrating monks.  

Lesson learnt:

  1. Might is not always right.
  2. Wealth could not buy the love.
  3. Wealth alone could not bring in happiness.
  4. How much wealthy is not important. How do we use the wealth is more important.
  5. Knowledge alone could lead to disasters.
  6. Might and Knowledge must be guided by Wisdom and Goodness.
  7. Might and power brought wealth but wealth brought in misery only. True happiness came from good deeds only.
  8. Physical possession of the body with the Might could not get the Love and Loving Kindness.
  9. The True Happiness comes only from pure heart and Good-deeds.
  10. What one possessed is not important but how you utilize that possession is more important.

A. Advice to Mg Tat or Myanmar Tatmadaw:

please open your eyes and ears and think about your beloved country and people. Don’t just obey the wrong orders of Be Loos or Ogres Generals like Senior General Than Shwe.

B. Advice to Ogres, SPDC Generals led by Senior General Than Shwe:

because of your wrong selfish advices and orders your Mg Tat or Myanmar Tatmadaw is now hated by all the people of Myanmar.

Please repent now and change  if you wish to see the happy ending of Myanmar Tatmadaw.

Give back the power you looted from the people and NLD.

Your good will could be rewarded back by NLD and people. At last after few years, your Military men could definitely win back the power in fair and square elections as your brothers in ASEAN.

Actually people love you in their hearts but because of your strong. cruel, violent and unfair tactics they hate you in the brains.

Metta is always reflected and flows to both side. If you could really give the tender loving kindness to all the people you would be respected and loved by all.

C. Advice to Zaw Gyis: Russia, North Korea and Pakistan, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, China and India to stop supporting economically and militarily to the illegitimate present Military Government.

D. Advice to Lu Du or the people of Burma: Please be brave, patient and continue with the Civil Disobedience. As our beloved Bo Gyoke had advised in the shortest speech before the revolution of Fascist Japan, “Search and attack the nearest enemy!”

If applied that General Aung San’s advice in the present situation, that could mean, “Search and attack the nearest Kyant Phut, Swan Arrshin, military personnal and police.”

[Adapted from Daw Khin Myo Chit’s “The Four Puppets,” Folk Tales from Asia for Children Everywhere.]

MAHA BANDULA