Rumors of New Catastrophe Sweep Rangoon

By MIN LWIN

Monday,June 16,2008

Now all hope of humanitarian intervention in Burma’s cyclone-devastated regions has vanished, rumors of another imminent natural catastrophe are sweeping Rangoon.

In the weeks following the cyclone, as US, British and French ships loaded with aid stood ready in international waters off Burma, many were certain that the three Western powers would decide to launch unilateral relief operations. Rumors spread widely that help was on its way. Continue reading

Is there no more hope for US intervention in Burma?

Is there no more hope for US intervention in Burma?

New York Times

Op-Ed Contributor MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT

Madeleine K. Albright was the United States secretary of state from 1997 to 2001.

THE Burmese government’s criminally neglectful response to last month’s cyclone, and the world’s response to that response, illustrate three grim realities today: totalitarian governments are alive and well; their neighbors are reluctant to pressure them to change; and the notion of national sovereignty as sacred is gaining ground, helped in no small part by the disastrous results of the American invasion of Iraq. Indeed, many of the world’s necessary interventions in the decade before the invasion — in places like Haiti and the Balkans — would seem impossible in today’s climate.

The first and most obvious reality is the survival of totalitarian government in an age of global communications and democratic progress. Myanmar’s military junta employs the same set of tools used by the likes of Stalin to crush dissent and monitor the lives of citizens. The needs of the victims of Cyclone Nargis mean nothing to a regime focused solely on preserving its own authority.

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The empire of human rights

The empire of human rights

Brunei Times, Ian Buruma, NEW YORK, Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

WHY are French, British, and American warships, but not Chinese or Malaysian warships, sitting near the Myanmarese coast loaded with food and other necessities for the victims of Cyclone Nargis? Why has the Association of South East Asian Nations (Asean) been so slow and weak in its response to a natural calamity that ravaged one of its own members?

The French junior Human Rights Minister, Rama Yade, declared that the United Nations’ principle of the “responsibility to protect” should be applied to Myanmar, forcibly if necessary.

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Burma: Than Shwe ‘ordered troops to execute villagers’

General Than Shwe

 

 

 

The leader of the Burmese junta, Than Shwe, personally ordered the murder of scores of unarmed villagers and Thai fishermen, according to a senior diplomat and military intelligence officer who defected to America. Continue reading

After French, U.S. Navy acknowledged defeat in confronting with Burma Generals

After French, U.S. Navy blinked in confronting with Burma Generals

 

After French, U.S. Navy back down in confronting with Burma Generals

US commander: Navy ships leaving Myanmar

Navy Adm. Timothy J. Keating, head of the U.S. forces in the Pacific, gestures during a news conference at the Pentagon, Wednesday, May 28, 2008. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)

By ROBERT BURNS, AP Military WriterWed May 28, 3:12 PM ET
The senior commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific says the Navy probably will withdraw a group of naval vessels from waters off the coast of Myanmar within days unless the government allows the ships to offload their relief supplies for cyclone victims.
Navy Adm. Timothy Keating, chief of the U.S. Pacific Command, said Wednesday he would discuss the matter later this week with Defense Secretary Robert Gates in Singapore, where they will attend an international security conference.
Keating said the group of ships, led by the amphibious assault ship USS Essex, has other scheduled commitments in the area, including a planned port visit to Hong Kong. They happened to have been in the Gulf of Thailand participating in a naval exercise when the cyclone struck May 2-3.
“Absent a green light from Burmese officials, I don’t think she will be there for weeks,” Keating told a Pentagon news conference, referring to the Essex. “Days, and then we’ll see.”
The admiral said the Myanmar authorities’ refusal to let the Navy provide relief aid is frustrating. He described the sailors and Marines aboard the Essex as “desperate” to provide help.

Calling for an immediate international intervention in Burma

National Campaign for Food and Freedom

Statement of global Burmese democratic forces and supporters

Calling for an immediate international intervention

by creating a coalition of willing

for food and freedoms in Burma

 

 

 

 

May 28, 2008

 

We, Burmese democratic organizations, along with Burma campaign groups  around the world are_

  • calling for an immediate international intervention in Burma,
  • reminding the international community that this is the time to bring a change in the military-ruled country.

  Continue reading

Intervene in Burma Now

Intervene in Burma Now

_ by Yebaw Day  in Burma Digest

1. ChiCom Masters are too busy with their Earthquake victims, and also in suppressing the Tibetans, and preparing for the Olympics, so they will not be able to help SPDC very much.
 
2. SPDC just lost about 300 men and 25 boats in their navy, and lost the South West Command in Pathein area.  So the entire Irrawaddy Division area is quite vulnerable for a beach landing, just like in the movie, the Longest Day, D-Day 6 June 1944. Continue reading