The Star:700 illegals involved in ruckus moved to another depot

By NURBAITI HAMDAN and ISABELLE LAI

Staff of Amnesty International visiting the immigration depot in Sepang.

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Malaysia Govt may legalise illegal workers

 

IMMIGRATION director-general Datuk Mahmood Adam says the government plans to legalise illegal workers in the country to better monitor them.

 

This is the Plan B the government will resort to if Plan A, which is to impose a minimum compound fine on foreigners who overstayed for a short period, to encourage them to go back to theircountry as soon as possible, does not work out.

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Please do not force the refugees in Malaysia to beg for money or to rob

Please do not force the refugees in Malaysia 


to beg for money or to rob

 

The Right to a Basic Standard of Life in ISLAM

Regarding the economic rights, the Holy Quran says:

And in their wealth there is acknowledged right for the needy and destitute. (51:19)

Anyone who needs help, irrespective of the race, religion or citizenship has a right in the property and wealth of the Muslims.

If you are in a position to help and a needy person asks you for help or if you come to know that he is in need, then it is your duty to help him.

Where is the Minister of Justice, Minister in the PM’s office Tan Seri Nazri Aziz, who even seemed to be championing for the Rohingyas, even mocking the Home Ministers that, HM did not know but he and PM’s security dpt had already arranged and approved all.

YAB DSAAB also acknowledged that Myanmar SPDC is hopeless and had even killed their own monks and Japanese photographer. But later even persuaded the other ASEAN leaders not to take action on the generals which was secretly recorded by Singaporeans.

After Tun Dr M introduced ‘San Oo Aung’ at the Perdana foundation function to his dear wife, Tun Dr Siti Hasma Mohd Ali, she commented to me in-front of the VIPs about the alleged kidnapping of a Malaysian by a Rohingya family. She even added her own experience of Rohingya beggars in-front of a shopping mall.

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What if we threw out all the illegal immigrants?

What if we threw out all the illegal immigrants?

go to MSN.comBy Shirley Skeel

Overnight, some industries would become desperate for workers. The biggest beneficiaries would be low-skilled American workers. The big losers might surprise you.

This is one in an occasional series on financial what-ifs.

At least 12 million illegal immigrants live in the U.S. Most pick crops, wash dishes, build houses, cut lawns and do other jobs for between $6 and $15 an hour. They make up about 5% of the total U.S. work force. But ..

What if we threw them all out?

Lettuce and strawberries would rot in the fields. Dirty dishes would pile up in restaurants. Thousands of farmers and builders would go bust. Predator aircraft drones would prowl the Mexican border. And chunks of Los Angeles and Houston would look like ghost towns.

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Treat all migrants equally Mr Home Minister

No quick solution for illegals in Sabah, says Syed Hamid

Comment:

Dear Home Minister. TQ for the talk of equal treatment for all the migrants. But most of us suspect that there is no political will or courage to solve the East Malaysia migrant problem but for all the Malaysian authorities, doing any thing to the Burmese (all races and religious groups) is so easy without any backlash or consequences. We suspect that you just made a sweet talk as an excuse for the inaction on those migrants there. But once you said about the equal treatment, we hope that as a Muslim and the high ranking Government Minister, you would keep you promise. In Burmese the promise of the king (read authority) is a vow or word of honour!

We could let it as by gone be by gone but please kindly treat our migrants exactly like those migrants in east Malaysia.

According to your Deputy Prime Minister, which is reported in the front page of local newspapers, those illegal migrant children would be granted citizenship. Is Malaysian government willing to extend this offer to Burmese Migrants?

The local newspaper front-page reported photograph of a school, one of THREE THOUSAND schools for Indonesian Illegal Migrants. Why Burmese legal and illegal migrants are even not allowed to attend Government schools. They are even willing to pay extra school fees.

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Why practice multiple standards in treating foreign migrants here?

Why practice multiple standards in treating foreign migrants here?

 

Malaysiakini news May 14, 08 6:00pm

 

My comment: It is very easy. To solve that Sabah problem and as a gesture of mercy to the Myanmars in West Malaysia, just transfer all the RELA to Sabah.orang asli court 200905 palace of justice

De facto lawzaid ibrahim and law students minister Zaid Ibrahim is the champion of Burmese Opposition. He should follow up with the unfair treatment on all the Burmese/Myanmars here.

 

Gerakan today urged the government to take concrete steps to address the grievances of Sabahans including the possibility of calling a royal commission on the issue of illegal immigrants in the state.

“This undesirable situation has led to a lot of discontent amongst the Sabah people who have also raised questions about how some illegal migrants managed to get permanent resident (PR) and even citizenship status,” said acting party leader Dr Koh Tsu Khoon in a statement today.
 

koh tsu koon wawasan university 220906 ponder“Therefore, in order to answer such queries and to take concrete measures to prevent more illegal migrants from entering Sabah, it may be necessary to set up a royal commission of enquiry as requested by some Barisan Nasional component parties.”

 

Koh was referring to the serious allegations that illegal immigrants from neighbouring Philippines and Indonesia have been given identity cards (IC) by the authorities to enable them to vote in elections.

He said the problem of illegal migrants is one of the many long-standing issues which has affected the “livelihood, social fabric, and security of the people of Sabah”.

There has been conflicting accounts from official and unofficial sources on the exact number of illegal immigrants in the state. Most, however, agree that the number is around 750,000.

The total number of foreigners, including illegal immigrants, in Sabah is estimated at 1.75 million.As a result, foreigners outnumbered locals in the state, which has a total population of 3.3 million. Most of the working foreigners are employed in the construction and agricultural sectors.

 

UPDATE:

Sabahan member of parliament Abdul Ghapur Salleh (BN-Kalabakan) said today_

 abdul ghapur sallehAsserting that crime and safety were issues that come under the responsibilities of the federal government, Abdul Ghapur called for a federal-level committee to tackle the issue of undocumented migrants. the issue of illegal immigrants, as they would want to be with the Philippines. What will happen to Sabah?! What will happen to Sabah?!”

Despite having raised these issues many times before, there seemed a lack of seriousness on the part of the administration in Putrajaya to solve the problems raised, he added.

“What goes into the (federal government’s) right ear comes out the left,” he said.

He also said “there are many double-standards in Barisan Nasional” Yes! read this below. For Myanmar citizens, even for the Muslims, we are unfairly discriminated.

There is also widespread discontent in Sabah over the steady influx of illegal immigrants from the Philippines and Indonesia who have somehow managed to obtain identity cards as well as voting rights.

Meanwhile, another component party United Pasok Momogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation (Upko) 

Party vice-president Dr Marcus Mojigoh warned that this could lead to the downfall of the Barisan government.

According to local newspaper Daily Express, Mojigoh said there were claims of “over a million newly-created Malays” from the Philippines and Indonesia in Sabah.

“Imagine (if) you have to address these illegals as ‘tuan’,” he lamented.
 
Mojigoh stressed the authorities must address the problem of illegal immigrants gaining citizenship and acquiring the Malay status through the back door.

 

Rela raids: futile exercises of power

UPDATE:

Sabahan member of parliament Abdul Ghapur Salleh (BN-Kalabakan) said today_

 abdul ghapur sallehAsserting that crime and safety were issues that come under the responsibilities of the federal government, Abdul Ghapur called for a federal-level committee to tackle the issue of undocumented migrants. the issue of illegal immigrants, as they would want to be with the Philippines. What will happen to Sabah?! What will happen to Sabah?!”

Despite having raised these issues many times before, there seemed a lack of seriousness on the part of the administration in Putrajaya to solve the problems raised, he added.

“What goes into the (federal government’s) right ear comes out the left,” he said.

He also said “there are many double-standards in Barisan Nasional” Yes! read this below. For Myanmar citizens, even for the Muslims, we are unfairly discriminated.

There is also widespread discontent in Sabah over the steady influx of illegal immigrants from the Philippines and Indonesia who have somehow managed to obtain identity cards as well as voting rights.

Meanwhile, another component party United Pasok Momogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation (Upko) 

Party vice-president Dr Marcus Mojigoh warned that this could lead to the downfall of the Barisan government.

According to local newspaper Daily Express, Mojigoh said there were claims of “over a million newly-created Malays” from the Philippines and Indonesia in Sabah.

“Imagine (if) you have to address these illegals as ‘tuan’,” he lamented.
 
Mojigoh stressed the authorities must address the problem of illegal immigrants gaining citizenship and acquiring the Malay status through the back door.

 

Rela raids: futile exercises of power

Malaysiakini letter by Alice Nah

May is terrified. A Rela raid is happening around her. They are storming down corridors, shouting at residents to demand entry, threatening to cut the locks. She just got back from the border after months in a detention centre. When she was deported to the Thai border, she had to pay RM1,900 to traffickers to be released and sent back to Malaysia. Otherwise, she might have been sold to a brothel.

May fled from Burma after soldiers raped her. If she is arrested, the nightmare begins again. Only this time, she may not be able to raise the money required to buy her freedom. She is already in deep debt. Kyaw was arrested in 2007. He was kept in different detention centers for two months, and then brought to court. There was no interpreter. He was sentenced to five months imprisonment and two strokes of the cane.

He was extremely afraid of the whipping. He was stretched out on a rack with his buttocks exposed. The pain from the first stroke was so intense that he blacked out. He stayed in jail for another two months, and then got deported. He too, had to pay traffickers to come back to Malaysia. He couldn’t go back to Burma, where he is afraid of the junta military. He will carry these scars on his buttocks for the rest of his life – Malaysia has branded him for his time here.

The Rela raids happen all the time; as I write this, a raid is going on in Ampang, Lembah Jaya, with refugees trapped in their homes, afraid that Rela personnel patrolling outside will bang on their doors. They SMS their fear. In 2007, the (previous) Home Affairs Minister said that Rela conducted between 30 to 40 raids a night. Detention centers have become overcrowded, packed beyond what their facilities are able to provide.

Women, children, and babies, are detained as well. Ex-detainees say that the food is meager; that they get sick often. There are no special provisions for babies and children. The say it is unbearably hot, that it is dirty, and the toilets stink. They sometimes don’t have place to lie down at night, because of the overcrowding. Tensions are high; they are desperate, not knowing how long they will be forced to stay. They fight lice and mosquitoes. I have seen fungus growing on the skin of ex-detainees. They are sometimes beaten badly.

What is the point of arresting refugees and stateless persons? They can’t go back to their homeland, even though most of them desperately want to. Malaysia is obligated under international customary law not to deport them to Burma – doing so would be an act of ‘refoulement’, returning them to where their life and/or liberty are threatened.

Instead, we populate them in our detention centres and prisons (which are already hopelessly overcrowded) and then deport them to the Thai border, where they are handed over to traffickers.

This is futile exercise of power, a waste of taxpayers’ resources. Migrant Care, an Indonesian NGO states that each Rela raid costs us about RM25,000. Add to that the costs of maintaining prisons and detention centers for people who do not belong there, as well as the time and resources of the police and immigration, which are better spent catching real criminals rather than vulnerable people fleeing persecution.

What is the point of arresting refugees and stateless persons, deporting them, and feeding the trafficking industry? Malaysia, like other civilised countries, need to play our part in ensuring that vulnerable populations are protected rather than further traumatised and harassed. We have obligations to protect under the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, to which we are signatories.

Both the committees who oversee the implementation of these conventions in all member countries have strongly urged Malaysia to put into place refugee status determination procedures so that refugees are legally recognised and given protection. However, Malaysia has not been responding to these calls by the international community.

Granted, enacting domestic laws takes time. However, there are immediate actions that can be done to protect refugees and to stop the waste of government expenditure. Firstly, Rela and Immigration officials can recognise identity documents produced by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) which identify which individuals are asylum seekers, refugees and stateless persons.

The Police recognise these documents, but Rela and immigration don’t. Secondly, they can give the UNHCR access to all asylum seekers, refugees and stateless persons in detention centers and prisons, so that they can verify if their claims for asylum and protection are genuine.

Thirdly, the Malaysian Government can formally exempt asylum seekers, refugees, and stateless persons under Section 55 of the Immigration Act, which has been recommended by the

Committee on the Rights of the Child. These are simple steps, in line with international obligations, that have tremendous power to reduce suffering amongst the persecuted.

In a raid last Wednesday in Klang, two days ago, we hear than fifteen children were arrested. They are from the Rohingya community, ethnic minorities from Burma, who are stateless. By accident of birth, and by acts of political power outside their control, they are ‘illegal’ everywhere they go. What will happen to these children?

Will they too, stay detained in detention centers for months, and then get deported to the Thai border? Who will pay traffickers for their release? Will they be sold to brothels or to individuals who will keep them, use them – for sex or as forced laborers – and re-sell them to other ‘private owners’, as has happened to others in the past? It is within our power to help these populations in distress. We are able to, we are obligated to, and we should.

The writer is executive committee member, Persatuan Kebangsaan Hak Asasi Manusia (Hakam) and a co-coordinator of the Migration Working Group.