Deaths at construction site highlight plight of migrant workers

Gabrielle Chong

 from:Malaysiakini

irene fernandez interview 251108 08The problems facing migrant workers have been brought to the forefront again following the gruesome death of two Bangladeshi workers at a construction site in Bangsar, Kuala Lumpur, last Sunday.

 

The two Bangladeshi workers were crushed to death by a ton of concrete bricks that fell from the 22nd floor of the almost-completed UOA Bangsar Tower after a crane cable snapped. The site is just a stone’s throw away from Malaysiakini office in Bangsar Utama.

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Contemplating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

By:Alice Nah

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realised.

The truth is that human beings are still suffering from warfare, poverty, torture, and violations of their freedoms and dignity.

We have_

migrant workers whose work permits get cancelled when they complain of unpaid wages — they have no effective means of obtaining redress, because they are considered “illegal” and are subject to arrest, detention and deportation before the courts make decisions on their cases.

We have _

  1. refugees who are whipped for immigration offences,
  2. stateless people who spend years in detention in squalid conditions,
  3. and children who are sentenced to indefinite incarceration.

How do we make sense of these realities in society?

How do we judge if these are morally and legally right? How to do we set limits on the treatment of our fellow men and women, regardless of their background?

This is the purpose of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights — to guide our actions and decisions so that we respect the fundamental human dignity of one another no matter what our differences.

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Early migrants, “Foreigners the bane of neighbours”

THE POT CALLING THE KETTLE BLACK?

 

EARLY MIGRANTS HATE THE NEW COMERS?

Foreigners the bane of neighbours

From ANOTHER WORRIED RESIDENT of Kuala Lumpur: I REFER to Worried Resident’s letter on “Disgusted by behaviour of foreign workers,” (The Star, Nov 9).

….Since then, we have had to put up with workers bathing, brushing teeth and washing their laundry in front of the house every day………..

Then both of you and the STAR editors who think it is fit to bash up poor foreign workers should all go back to INDIA, CHINA OR INDONESIA where your ancestors came. Because according to your logic and anti-foreigner concepts, your ancestors SHOULD ALSO SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED TO COME HERE, because all first generation migrants who are not professional migrants are dirty, doing dangerous and non-dignified low pay jobs that the locals shun.

ACTUALLY ALMOST THE WHOLE POPULATION OF SINGAPORE ARE MIGRANTS BUT THEY ALL ARE ARROGANT ON NEW COMERS. BUT MOST OF THEM ARE COWARDS/EUNUCHS AND DARE NOT EVEN SAY ANYTHING ABOUT THE LEE DYNASTY. BUT THEY WILL BULLY OTHERS EVERYWHERE, IN THE CYBERSPACE OR EVEN IN WIKI. 

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REAL protection of rights in Malaysian law will end abuse of workers

REAL protection of rights in Malaysian law will end abuse of workers

CHARLES HECTOR , Friday, September 05, 2008

There are 2.2 million foreign migrant workers in Malaysia today, and our government again and again talks about reducing the number of migrant workers….but alas, it is just talk.

Every year, we have this large scale crack-downs and deportations – and then we have the employers here and there talking about labour shortages – and the doors are re-opened for more foreign migrant workers to again re-enter the country.

The arrest and deportation exercise, I believe, is to appease the local Malaysian people. So much of our money is wasted.

If only, the employers, and not the poor workers, were targeted – not only would money be saved but also the employment problems may be resolved.

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Chikungunya fever

Chikungunya fever

Chikungunya

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Aedes aegypti mosquito biting human flesh.Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an insect-borne virus, of the genus, Alphavirus, that is transmitted to humans by virus-carrying Aedes mosquitoes.[1] There have been recent outbreaks of CHIKV associated with severe morbidity. CHIKV causes an illness with symptoms similar to dengue fever. CHIKV manifests itself with a prolonged arthralgic disease that affects the joints of the extremities. The acute febrile phase of the illness lasts only two to five days. The pain associated with CHIKV infection of the joints persists for weeks or months.[2][3]

Treatment

There are no specific treatments for Chikungunya. There is no vaccine currently available. A Phase II vaccine trial, sponsored by the US Government and published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in 2000, used a live, attenuated virus, developing viral resistance in 98% of those tested after 28 days and 85% still showed resistance after one year.[10]

A serological test for Chikungunya is available from the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Chloroquine is gaining ground as a possible treatment for the symptoms associated with chikungunya, and as an antiviral agent to combat the Chikungunya virus. A University of Malaya study found that for arthritis-like symptoms that are not relieved by aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), chloroquine phosphate (250 mg/day) has given promising results.[11]

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Day dreaming again? Gov’t to halve foreign workers by 2010

Day dreaming again? 

Or just show-off the antiforeigner policy to please the citizens? 

Gov’t to halve foreign workers by 2010

Malaysiakini news Jun 6, 08

The government plans to almost halve the number of foreigners working in the plantation and manufacturing sectors in two years by reducing its yearly foreign intake by 400,000.

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Care Latte with the Home Minister of Malaysia:

Care Latte with the Home Minister:

Homing in on Home issues

www.wongchunwai.com

 

 

Extracts only. Sunday, 20 April 2008  

Datuk Seri Syed Hamid Albar is responsible for one of the most important, if not powerful, ministries in the Cabinet. Speaking to The Star’s Group Chief Editor, he talked about his tasks from heading law enforcement agencies to deciding on the role of the media, his upcoming plans for the ministry, Umno, and the country’s political outlook.

What are your plans for the Home Ministry?

Syed Hamid: The Home Ministry is the second biggest with a staff of 159,000.

  • Now we are more open to public scrutiny.
  • This is a challenging and interesting ministry and it’s close to the people’s hearts.

If you talk on matters of_

  • immigration, visas, passports,
  • the National Registration Department,
  • permanent residence
  • and citizenship status,

all are in the limelight. Continue reading