Myanmar Embassy Fire May Delay Visas for Cyclone Relief Workers

By Michael Heath

A big fire breaks out at Myanmar embassy in Bangkok, capital of Thailand, in the morning of May 26, 2008. Cause of the fire was unknown yet.  

photo:Xinhua

 

May 27 (Bloomberg) — International aid workers seeking permission to enter Myanmar to help survivors of Tropical Cyclone Nargis may be delayed after a fire at Myanmar’s embassy in Bangkok, the United Nations said.

The fire “prompted the closure of the visa section and created a fresh obstacle for the aid community,” the UN’s news service IRIN said in a report from Thailand’s capital. It didn’t give any details of how long visa applications may be delayed. Continue reading

Myanmar Cyclone photo album from Reuters Part 6

Reuters

 

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A woman sits at her destroyed home in a village hit by Cyclone Nargis, outside of Yangon May 20, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

Continue reading

Photo proof of:Irresponsible United Nations is dragging its feet in applying “responsibility to protect” the Burmese people

Photo proof of:

 

Irresponsible United Nations’ dragging its feet

 

in applying “responsibility to protect”

 

the Burmese people

 

 

  Continue reading

Myanmar Cyclone photo album from Reuters Part 5

Myanmar Cyclone photo album from Reuters Part 5

Reuters

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A boy watches as a man builds a shelter in a village hit by Cyclone Nargis, near the Myanmar capital Yangon, May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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People take shelter in a pagoda in an area affected by Cyclone Nargis, near the Myanmar capital Yangon, May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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A marine walks past boxes of packaged potable water on the USS Essex about 80 nautical miles south of Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

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A boy carries water at a village hit by Cyclone Nargis, outside Yangon, May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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The USS Essex is seen from a helicopter about 80 nautical miles south of Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta May 16, 2008. The USS Essex is currently stationed in international waters to the south of the delta pending permission to carry out the delivery of humanitarian relief goods to people hit by Cyclone Nargis.

REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

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Buddhist monks from the Sitagu Missionary Association travel on a boat carrying donated rice for cyclone victims as they move out from Kyaiklat to Bogalay, one of the worst-hit areas by Cyclone Nargis, May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Aung Hla Tun

 

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People take shelter in a pagoda in an area affected by Cyclone Nargis, near the Myanmar capital Yangon, May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

 

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A young monk adjusts his robe next to a pagoda in an area affected by Cyclone Nargis, near the Myanmar capital Yangon, May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

 

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A woman and her children stay in their home at a village hit by Cyclone Nargis, outside Yangon, May 16, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

PHOTOS: Devastating Aftermath of Cyclone Part 1

Devastating Aftermath of Cyclone Part 1

 ABC News

Myanmar

At left, a survivor sits at his home, which was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis, near the town of Kyaiklat, southwest of Yangon, May 7, 2008.
(Strringer/Reuters )

       Myanmar

Cyclone-affected families await relief goods under open skies after losing their homes in Labutta, a town in the Irrawaddy division of southwest Myanmar, in this undated photo.
(AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar

A man, right, passes out water to cyclone victims as they wait for relief goods in Labutta.
(AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar

Cyclone victims wait for relief goods to arrive in Labutta on May 7, 2008, a town in the Irrawaddy division of southwest Myanmar devastated by Cyclone Nargis.
(AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar

Villagers bring an injured women in for treatment at a makeshift medical aid center after fleeing the cyclone-hit Dedaye township, south of Yangon on May 7, 2008. A UN spokesman said about 1,930 square miles of Myanmar’s cyclone-hit regions remain underwater, with more than a million people in need of emergency relief. Disaster medicine experts worry that without immediate assistance, the death toll will climb from the May 2-3 cyclone.
(Khin Maung Win/AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar

Myanmar children look on as they take temporary shelter at a center in Kyauktan Township, in southern Myanmar on Thursday May 8, 2008.
(AP Photo)

Myanmar

Cyclone victims await rice rations on the outskirt of Yangon, Myanmar, Thursday May 8, 2008.
(AP Photo)

Myanmar

Cyclone-affected people try to dry grains of food in the cyclone-hit area of Dedaye township, on May 7, 2008.
(Khin Maung Win/AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar

Myanmar children are shown with a yellow substance painted on their faces. Thanakha, made from ground wood, is worn primarily as a sunblock and for cosmetic purposes, and gives a cooling sensation to the skin. These children, whose homes were destroyed by the cyclone, look on while taking shelter in a monastery in Kaw Hmu village, Thursday, May 8, 2008.
(AP Photo)

Myanmar

A child, center, from a displaced family cries as another feeds from a bottle after their families fled areas near Dedaye township.
(Khin Maung Win/AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar

A Burmese woman sleeps on top of tables as they wait for relief goods in Kyauktan Township, southern Myanmar on Thursday May 8, 2008.
(AP Photo)

Myanmar

With reporting by ABC News’ reporters Nick Schifrin, Kirit Radia, Dan Childs and Toni Bronzo.
(AP Photo)

NASA photos of Myanmar Cyclone Nargis 2

                       NASA’s Landsat Looks at Cyclone Nargis Floods in Burma

May 12, 2008

The city of Yangôn (also called Rangoon) in Burma, is tucked into a “V” between two rivers that empty into the Gulf of Martaban through a large estuary. When Cyclone Nargis passed over the city in the first week of May 2008, the entire coastal plain flooded, surrounding Yangôn with water.

This pair of images from NASA’s Landsat satellite shows the city and surrounding agricultural land before and after the storm. On March 18, 2008, the built up part of the city and its suburbs appear bluish purple, fallow cropland is pinkish-tan, and vegetation is dark green. The wide rivers are a muddy green.

After Nargis inundated the area with heavy rains and storm surge, standing water covered almost the entire area. As of May 5, flooding in the heart of the city appeared to be less than in the surrounding areas. Flooding probably exists, but it may be at a smaller scale than Landsat is able to detect. However, all the land to the west and southwest and most of the area to the east and southeast are still submerged.
Across the river to the southeast of the city, a swath of relatively dry land — perhaps higher in elevation, or protected by a levee — extends toward the lower right corner of the image. Across the rest of the scene, standing water varies in shades from muddy brown, to green, to purplish blue.

Myanmar Cyclone photo album from Reuter Part 4

Myanmar Cyclone photo album from Reuter Part 4

 

 

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Men rebuild a damaged house in Yangon Pauk, Myanmar, May 12, 2008.  

REUTERS/Stringer

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A woman waits with others for aid handouts near Danouk, Myanmar, May 12, 2008.  

REUTERS/Stringer

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A boy smiles as he eats a piece of bread which he received from a doctor with a foreign non-governmental organization medical team visiting the village which was hit by Cyclone Nargis, outside Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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A woman sits outside her dwelling as men work on a shelter behind her in a village affected by Cyclone Nargis located near the Myanmar capital Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/StringerPhoto 

Survivors of Cyclone Nargis stay at a shelter as a foreign nongovernmental organization medical team arrive to treat them, at a village outside Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/StringerPhoto 

A survivor of Cyclone Nargis holds medicine and bread at a shelter as a foreign nongovernmental organization medical team arrived to treat them at a village outside Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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Children survivors of Cyclone Nargis look out a window of their damaged home as a foreign non-governmental organization medical team arrives to treat them in a village outside Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/StringerPhoto 

A child eats in a village affected by Cyclone Nargis located near the Myanmar capital Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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A worker labels a box containing water purification system donated by the Singapore Red Cross bound for Myanmar at a warehouse in Singapore May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Tim Chong

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Survivors of Cyclone Nargis stay at a shelter as a foreign nongovernmental organization medical team arrive to treat them at a village outside Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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Survivors of Cyclone Nargis stay in a shelter as a foreign non-governmental organization medical team arrives to treat them, in a village outside Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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Internally displaced people eat at a relief centre near Dedaye, in the Irrawaddy Delta, in the Irrawaddy Delta May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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Equipment for water preparation into a Iljushin 76 cargo plane at Frankfurt Hahn airport May 13, 2008.

REUTERS/Alex Grimm

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A child rests inside a damaged school house, along with dozens of families, in a village affected by Cyclone Nargis located near the Myanmar capital Yangon May 14, 2008.

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REUTERS/Stringer

A child is carried by a boy in a village affected by Cyclone Nargis located near the Myanmar capital Yangon May 14, 2008.

REUTERS/Stringer

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A nurse tends to a wounded person in Bogalay hospital May 13, 2008.

REUTERS/International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/Handout