OH, IT’S SO DIFFICULT TO GIVE UP THE POWER

OH, IT’S SO DIFFICULT TO GIVE UP THE POWER

Posted by Super Admin in Malaysia Today

Now, it is not fair to suggest that only Myanmar SPDC Junta leaders are very reluctant or find it difficult to let go of power. It’s the same all over. Politicians have not been described as possessing animal-like behaviour for nothing — that’s why we have the term ‘political animal’.

Adapted, edited and Burmanized from Paul Sir’s article in The Borneo Post

IT seems that we are in the season of power transition in the country.

Now, let’s take an honest view about these so-called power transition being bandied about in the country. The first question to ask is — did these political leaders step down voluntarily or were they pressured to do so?

Your guess is as good as mine.

Now, it is not fair to suggest that only Myanmar SPDC Junta leaders are very reluctant or find it difficult to let go of power. It’s the same all over. Politicians have not been described as possessing animal-like behaviour for nothing — that’s why we have the term ‘political animal’.

  • Like the tigress jealously guarding her cubs or the viper protecting its territory and ready to put its life on the line, those with political power behave in the same manner.
  • They are very protective of their own space and will fight with whatever means to prevent others from entering.
  • History has shown how despots had even gone to the extent of committing mass murder and alienating the entire population just to cling on to power.
  • Sadly, we still have such kind of sick political animals in our midst today. Just think Robert Mugabe. 

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Blog standard: Politics on the web. Authoritarian governments can lock up bloggers. It is harder to outwit them

Blog standard: Politics on the web

Malaysia Today Friday, 27 June 2008

Authoritarian governments can lock up bloggers. It is harder to outwit them

From Egypt to Malaysia to Saudi Arabia to Singapore, bloggers have in recent months found themselves behind bars for posting materials that those in power dislike. The most recent Worldwide Press Freedom Index, published by Reporters Without Borders, a lobby group, estimates their number at a minimum of 64.

The Economist

WHAT do Barbra Streisand and the Tunisian president, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, have in common? They both tried to block material they dislike from appearing on the internet. And they were both spectacularly unsuccessful. In 2003 Ms Streisand objected to aerial photographs of her home in Malibu appearing in a collection of publicly available coastline pictures. She sued (unsuccessfully) for $50m—and in doing so ensured that the pictures gained far wider publicity.

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Sorry state of un-Islamic Muslim leaders around the world

Sorry state of

un-Islamic Muslim leaders

around the world

Extracted and changed from the famous MALAYSIAN BLOGGER’S ARTICLE, to reflect most of the world’s selfish, narrow minded and Xenophobic Muslim leaders

“ASEAN’s interests come first”, says the leader,” reported the Newspapers today.

The Newspapers then went on to report the leader as saying, “We should always consider the ASEAN’s interests above all else.”

 Sura Al-Fatiha

is the first chapter of the Muslim holy book, the Qur’an. Its seven verses are a prayer for God’s guidance and stress the lordship and mercy of God. This chapter has a special role in the Muslims’ daily prayers (Salat), being recited at the start of each unit of prayer, or rak’ah.Verse five of this sura says: You alone we worship, and You alone we ask for help.