Good Governance in Islam 2

 

Good Governance in Islam

[ An order to Maalik al-Ashtar. ]

Maalik al-Ashtar was a famous companion of Imam Ali (a). He was the head of the Bani Nakha’i clan. He was a faithful disciple of Imam Ali (a). He was a brave warrior and had acted as a Commander-in-Chief of the armies of Imam Ali (a). His valour had earned him the title of “Fearless Tiger”. Imam Ali (a) had specially taught him the principles of administration and jurisprudence. 

 

The following instructions in the form of a letter were written to him by Imam Ali (a) who appointed him as the Governor of Egypt in place of Muhammad bin Abi Bakr:

 

This letter is a précis of the principles of administration and justice as dictated by Islam. It deals with the duties and obligations of rulers, their chief responsibilities, the question of priorities of rights and obligations, dispensation of justice, control over secretaries and subordinate staff; distribution of work and duties amongst the various branches of administration, their co-ordination with each other and their co-operation with the centre. In it Imam Ali (a) advises Maalik to combat corruption and oppression amongst the officers, to control markets and imports and exports, to curb evils of profiteering, hoarding, black-marketing. In it he has also explained stages of various classes in a society, the duties of the government towards the lowest class, how they are to be looked after and how their conditions are to be improved, the principle of equitable distribution of wealth and opportunities, orphans and their up-bringing, maintenance of the handicapped, crippled and disabled persons and substitutes in lieu of homes for the aged and the disabled.

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Good Governance in Islam

 

Good Governance in Islam

IN public administration all the key public functionaries ought to be people of high calibre, just and energetic and must possess qualities of head and heart. In the words of fourth rightly guided Caliph Hazrat Ali (RA) they should have the qualities of refinement, experience, alertness, power of comprehending problems, secrecy, freedom from greed and lust. 

A careful analysis of principles of administration and qualities of an administrator from Islamic point of view would show that man’s personal character is the key to good governance. 
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Good governance, in Islam, for toll gates keep who are using Red tapes to get greased handsers

 

Good governance, in Islam, for toll gates keepers

who are using Red tapes  to get greased hands

Good governance, in Islam, has a more refined description than the Western notion of ‘the process of decision-making and the process by which decisions are implemented’.

IT IS to be duly noted that one of the distinctive features of the religious, intellectual and scientific tradition of Islam is the utmost care given to the correct and precise connotation and denotation of terminologies, a feature rendered possible by the root system of the Arabic language.

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Red tape and toll gates managed by ‘Little Napoleons’ everywhere

Red tape and toll gates

managed by ‘Little Napoleons’ everywhere

COMMENT: I had wrote to Tun and YAB DSAAB directly few times about this problems faced by Burmese migrants in Malaysia. (May be my letters never reach those great leaders but stuck at some  toll gates due to Red tapes.)

I complaint about Immigration officers, Home Ministry and National registration departments’ unfair discriminations, red tapes, never ending new rules and regulations, esp. on Myanmar/ Burmese and even on the professsionals but nothing ever changed  nor any improved for us.

It is apparent that the government machineries are being held back by a profusion of rulings and regulations where application of ‘grease’ may be the answer.

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Malaysia should aim for the affordable and effective Universal health care for all

Malaysia should aim for the affordable and effective 

Universal health care for all

Universal health care is health care coverage that is extended to all eligible residents of a governmental region. Universal health care often covers medical, dental, and mental health care. These programs vary in their structure and funding mechanisms. Typically, most costs are met via asingle-payer health care system or compulsoryhealth insurance. Universal health care is provided in all wealthy, industrialized countries, except for the United States.[1][2] It is also provided in many developing countries and is the trend worldwide.

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n-search of affordable and effective health care system for all the people

 

In-search of affordable and effective health care system

for all the people

The study to privatise public heathcare services and hospitals by the government began in the late 1980’s and it came into the open when the Seventh Malaysia plan was unveiled. There were 12 major entities/projects earmarked for privatisation and eight for corporatisation. One of the eight were hospitals.

Apparently the government had studied many healthcare systems in the world but could not find any system that could fit with what the government is looking for until today. This is because there is no where in the world that we can find a system that completely divorces the government from the responsibility to provide healthcare coverage to all its citizens.

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AFP:Myanmar cyclone survivors struggle to rebuild lives

 

KUNGYANGON, Myanmar (AFP) — With tents still serving as homes and schools seven months after Cyclone Nargis lashed Myanmar, survivors say they are struggling to rebuild their lives as international aid trickles in.

Fisherman Htein Lin Aung, a father of three, says a new roof is out of the question as he fixes the engine of his boat beneath the tarpaulin covering of his bamboo tent outside the town of Kungyangon.

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